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Acequia

2006. Silvia Rodriguez

Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. The acequia or irrigation ditch associations of Taos, Río Arriba, Mora, and other northern New Mexico counties offer an alternative.

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All That Glitters

1999. Duane Anderson; Foreword by Lonnie Vigil

All That Glitters, the first comprehensive study of the micaceous pottery tradition in New Mexico, explores the current transition of micaceous pottery from a traditional culinary ware to an exciting contemporary art form. The illustrated catalog of the micaceous pottery collection at SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center and a roster of micaceous potters practicing in northern New Mexico today further details the art form.

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Ambos Nogales

2002. Photographs by Maeve Hickey; Text by Lawrence Taylor

Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales.

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The Anasazi in a Changing Environment

1988. Edited by George J. Gumerman

The book outlines a thousand-year chronicle of environmental and cultural history that provides an experimental baseline for explaining broad patterns of interaction between humans and their environment. It sets a new standard in archaeological research, and at the same time links the ancient past with the modern world around us in thought-provoking fashion.

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The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon

2006. Edited by Stephen H. Lekson

Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. Two decades after the latest and largest program of field research at Chaco (the National Park Service’s Chaco Project from 1971 to 1982) the original researchers and other leading Chaco scholars convened to evaluate what they now know about Chaco in light of new theories and new data.

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The Architecture of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1993. Winifred Creamer

From 1971 to 1974, the School of American Research conducted a major multidisciplinary program of excavation and research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth-century Rio Grande sites. At its peak, Arroyo Hondo contained about one thousand rooms. This seventh volume in the series is focused on the walls, roomblocks, and architecture of public spaces at the site.

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The Arroyo Hondo New Mexico Site Survey

1979. D. Bruce Dickson Jr.

This second volume in the Arroyo Hondo series provides the results of the archaeological survey of this large prehistoric pueblo located just southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds

2003. Gloria J. Emerson; Forward by N. Scott Momaday

These poems, paintings, and personal reflections draw upon an ancient culture while crafting new visual and poetic “legends” to enrich our understanding of the significant places and stories that mark the traditional lands of the Navajo people.

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Chaco & Hohokam

1991. Edited by Patricia L. Crown and W. James Judge

Synthesizing data and current thought about the regional systems of the Chacoans and the Hohokam, eleven archaeologists examine settlement patterns, subsistence economy, social organization, and trade, shedding new light on two of the most sophisticated cultures of the prehistoric Southwest.

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The Chaco Experience

2008. Ruth Van Dyke

The Chacoan landscape, with its formally constructed, carefully situated architectural features, is charged with symbolism. In this volume, Ruth Van Dyke analyzes the meanings and experience of moving through this landscape to illuminate Chacoan beliefs and social relationships.

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The Contemporary Ecology of Arroyo Hondo New Mexico

1983. N. Edmund Kelley

From 1971 to 1974, the School of American Research conducted a major multidisciplinary program of excavation and research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth-century Rio Grande sites. This first volume in the series covers the area’s topography, geology, soil, climate, hydrology, vegetation, and animal life.

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Cowboys & Cave Dwellers

1997. Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson

In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation’s priceless archaeological heritage.

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Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians

2004. Jill D. Sweet

This expanded edition features the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community.

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El Delirio

1998. Gregor Stark and E. Catherine Rayne

Richly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs, El Delirio offers an appealing glimpse into a fascinating period of Santa Fe history. It is also a loving portrait of the remarkable, energetic, and strong-willed Elizabeth White, described by a friend as “one of the great women of the Southwest in a very small body.”

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The Faunal Remains from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1984. Richard W. Lang and Arthur H. Harris

This fifth volume presents the results of faunal analysis from the Arroyo Hondo excavations, covering the topics of prehistoric vegetation and climate; the importance of various animals in the diet; seasonal hunting patterns; methods of butchering, skinning, and cooking; the prehistoric hunting territory; the raising of domesticated dogs and turkeys; and trade in animals and animal products.

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Fixing the Books

2015. Erin Debenport

This ethnographic study of emergent literacy provides a complex picture of secrecy, intellectual property, and the formation of publics through its examination of the relationships between prevailing linguistic ideologies, intertextual connections, and the contexts surrounding the production of indigenous language texts.

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The Great Basin

2008. Edited by Catherine S. Fowler and Don D. Fowler

This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment.

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A History of the Ancient Southwest

2009. Stephen H. Lekson

While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures.

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A History of the Navajos

1999. Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey

While many Native Americans have subordinated their tribal identity to their identity as Indians, unique historical circumstances have allowed the Navajos to maintain their uniqueness. This book examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation.

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The Hohokam Millennium

2008. Edited by Suzanne K. Fish and Paul R. Fish

Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more.

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Indians & Energy

2010. Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner

This book explores the ways people have transformed natural resources in the American Southwest into fuel supplies for human consumption. Not only do Native Americans possess a large percentage of the Southwest’s total acreage, but much of the nation’s coal, oil, and uranium resources reside on tribal lands.

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Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest

2001. Susan Brown McGreevy; Foreword by Kevin Navasie

Exploring the history and the current renaissance of basket making in the Native American Southwest, this lavishly illustrated volume features the work and words of the contemporary basket makers that participated in a Convocation at the School of American Research.

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Indian Painters of the Southwest

2002. Katherine L. Chase; Foreward by Diane Reyna

The book profiles ten outstanding painters representing seven different Pueblo Indian groups and the Navajo Nation who participated in a convocation at the Indian Arts Research Center at the SAR.

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In Search of Chaco

2004. Edited by David Grant Noble

This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers.

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In the Places of the Spirits

2010. David Grant Noble; Foreword by N. Scott Momaday

This book represents the culmination of David Grant Noble’s forty-year career as a fine arts photographer and writer. It features seventy-six duotone plates of the land, people, and deep past of the Southwest, most published here for the first time.

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Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe

2008. Edited, annotated, and introduced by Marit K. Munson

Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider’s portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe.

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Living the Ancient Southwest

2014. Edited by David Grant Noble

In this illustrated anthology, readers will discover chapters written over the past several decades by anthropologist-writers. They speak about the beauty and originality of Mimbres pottery, the rock paintings in Canyon de Chelly, the history of the Wupatki Navajos, O’odham songs describing ancient trails to the Pacific Coast, and other subjects relating to the deep indigenous history and culture of the American Southwest.

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Memory Work

2008. Edited by Barbara J. Mills and William H. Walker

In this book the authors focus on a set of case studies that illustrate how social memories were made through repeated, patterned, and engaged social practices.

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The Mesa Verde World

2006. Edited by David Grant Noble

This book showcases new findings about the region’s prehistory, environment, and archaeological history, from newly discovered reservoir systems on Mesa Verde to astronomical alignments at Yellow Jacket Pueblo.

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Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition

2005. J. J. Brody

In this revised edition, noted Mimbres scholar Dr. J. J. Brody incorporates the extensive fieldwork done since the original publication in 1977, updating his discussion of village life, the larger world in which the Mimbres people lived, and how the art that they practiced illuminates these wider issues.

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Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875

2010. David M. Brugge

Combining archaeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest – the Catholic Church – to shed light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation.

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Orayvi Revisited

1992. Jerrold E. Levy

Challenging the widely held view of the Hopi Indians of Arizona as a sober, peaceful, and cooperative people with an egalitarian social organization, Levy examines the 1906 split in the Third Mesa village of Orayvi.

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The Origins of Language

1999. Edited by Barbara J. King

In this volume ten primatologists and paleoanthropologists conduct a comprehensive examination of the nonhuman primate data, discussing different views of what language is and suggesting how the primatological perspective can be used to fashion more rigorous theories of language origins and evolution.

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A Peculiar Alchemy

2007. Nancy Owen Lewis and Kay Leigh Hagan; Preface by James F. Brooks

This book brings to life the people, debates, conflicts, and creativity that make the School for Advanced Research an exciting and thought-provoking place to study, work, and create. It serves at once as the story of an exceptional institution and a fascinating history of anthropology and anthropology’s diverse cast of characters.

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Painting the Underworld Sky

2006. Mateo Romero, with a foreword by Suzan Shown Harjo

The fifty paintings reproduced here and the artist’s reflections on his own life and that of his father lead the reader to a profound appreciation of the power of Pueblo song and dance to spark those brief flashes of light and hope in this dark fourth world.

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Pueblo Population and Society

1983. Ann M. Palkovich

Excavation at Arroyo Hondo yielded 120 human skeletons, many accompanied by grave goods. Palkovich examines skeletal pathologies in relation to age distribution, offering insights into the demographic impact of malnutrition.

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The People

1993. Text and photographs by Stephen Trimble

In this book, Stephen Trimble provides an introduction to these Native peoples that is unrivaled in its scope and readability. Graced with an absorbing, well-researched text, a wealth of maps and historic photographs, and the author’s penetrating contemporary portraits and landscapes, The People is the indispensable reference for anyone interested in the Indians of the Southwest.

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The Peopling of Bandelier

2005. Edited by Robert P. Powers

In this beautifully illustrated book, archaeologists, historians, ecologists, and Pueblo contributors tell a deep and sweeping story of the region.

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The Pottery from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1993. Judith A. Habicht-Mauche

In this eighth volume of the Arroyo Hondo Archaeological Series, Judith A. Habicht-Mauche builds on an exhaustive study of the mineralogical and chemical attributes of the ceramic assemblage to produce a penetrating evaluation of the stylistic diversity, origins, and changes through time of the pottery types found at Arroyo Hondo.

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The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented

2010. Sarah Bronwen Horton

Through close readings of canonical texts by New Mexican historian Fray Angélico Chávez about La Conquistadora, a fifteenth-century Marian icon to whom legend credits Don Diego De Vargas’s “peaceful” resettlement, and through careful attention to the symbolic action of the event, this book explores the tropes of gender, time, genealogy, and sexuality through which this form of cultural nationalism is imagined.

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Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City

2008. Edited by David Grant Noble

Drawing on recent archaeological discoveries and historical research, this updated edition of a classic history details the town’s founding, its survival through revolt and reconquest, its turbulent politics, its lively trade with Mexico and the United States, and the lives of its most important citizens, from the governors Peralta, Vargas, and Armijo to the madam doña Tules.

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A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

2005. Jason S. Shapiro

Following the premise that built space embodies social organization, Jason Shapiro takes a fresh look at architectural data from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, a fourteenth-century site in the northern Rio Grande Valley of presentday New Mexico. Using the theoretical assumptions and mathematical techniques of space syntax analysis, he explores what changes in architecture reveal about people’s social lives.

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Spanish-American Blanketry

1987. H.P. Mera; with an introduction by Kate Peck Kent

In 1984, while studying textiles in the collections of the School of American Research, Kate Peck Kent discovered a manuscript on Spanish-American weaving by the late H.P. Mera, curator of archaeology at Santa Fe’s Lab of Anthropology. This forgotten manuscript describes the origin and history of the distinctive textiles woven by Spanish-Americans in New Mexico.

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Sustaining Thought

2007. Leslie Shipman with Rosemary Carstens

With this cookbook and a few fresh ingredients, our alumni can relive fond memories of their stay with us, and those who have long wondered what goes on behind our adobe walls can enjoy a taste of SAR’s riches.

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Unkar Delta

1980. Douglas W. Schwartz, Richard C. Chapman, and Jane Kepp

This book is the first volume in SAR’s Archaeology of the Grand Canyon series. It provides information on the archaeological excavation conducted at the site during the late 1960s.

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Villages of Hispanic New Mexico

1987. Text and photographs by Nancy Hunter Warren

Nancy Hunter Warren trained her camera on scenes rarely witnessed by outsiders — a Penitente service, the blessing of a ditch, feast days, religious processions, the interiors of houses and village churches. Her photographs, taken between 1973 and 1985, preserve a valuable record of rapidly vanishing traditions in the remote Hispanic villages of New Mexico.

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Yazz

1983. Sallie R. Wagner, J. J. Brody, and Beatien Yazz

Yazz affords the reader a rare opportunity to know a Native American artist who is at once traditional and inventive, well known and obscure: an enigma in the larger mainstream American art world.

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