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SAR: A Timeline

1907

1907

 

Edgar Lee Hewett at Caroline Bridge in Utah, 1907

Edgar Lee Hewett at Caroline Bridge in Utah, 1907

School of American Archaeology founded by Edgar Lee Hewett, leading to some of the most significant archaeological digs in the Southwest in the twentieth century, including Bandelier, Chaco Canyon, and Mesa Verde, among others.

1908

1908

School’s first published report, eventually leading to creation of SAR Press. To date, SAR Press has published over 700 volumes, which have shaped innovative scholarly thought in anthropology, the social sciences, and Native American art.

1917

1917

Name changed to School of American Research by founder Edgar Lee Hewett to better reflect the School’s expanded focus on “the entire group of subjects that proceed from the study of man.”

1922

1922

The School launches Southwest Indian Fair, precursor to Indian Market, which it sponsored through 1926. Today Santa Fe’s Indian Market is the largest and most prestigious intertribal fine art market in the world.

1959

1959

School separates from the Museum of New Mexico and distinguishes itself as an independent institution, which continues to gather and care for its own impressive collection of Native American art.

1967

1967

Douglas W. Schwartz named president. Schwartz revitalized the institution and broadened its focus to embrace advanced scholarship in anthropology and the humanities worldwide and to promote the study, preservation, and creation of Southwest Indian art.

1968

1968

 

First SAR advanced seminar held. Today’s advanced seminars draw leading scholars from around the world to expand knowledge of humanity’s past and forge pioneering solutions to today’s challenges.

 

1972

1972

 

“El Delirio” campus bequeathed to SAR by Elizabeth White. The historic eight-acre property, which includes some of the original buildings, offers a uniquely inspiring environment that nurtures creative thought for scholars and artists.

1973

1973

Resident scholar program begins. Since then, SAR has funded the work of more than 350 SAR scholars and artists, among whose ranks are six MacArthur Fellows and eighteen Guggenheim Fellows.

1978

1978

IARC building completed, allowing SAR to amass one of the most important collections of Southwest Native American art in the world and provide a venue to engage Native American communities and visiting public in in-depth ways. The IARC has welcomed approximately 30,000 visitors since 1978.

1984

1984

 

Thanks to a bequest from Katrin H. Lamon, Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi) and Greg Cajete (Santa Clara Pueblo) are the first Native American artist fellows at SAR.

 

1994

1994

 

IARC secures separate funding for artist residencies. The School has provided fellowships for seventy-one Native American artists since 1984, many of whom are internationally recognized.

2001

2001

Douglas W. Schwartz retires as president and becomes an SAR senior scholar, continuing to research, write, lecture, and guide field trips at SAR.

2007

2007

Celebration of the School’s centennial. This was a momentous year in which SAR changed its name from the School of American Research to the School for Advanced Research to better reflect the global reach of its support for scholarship in the social sciences and humanities.

2016

2016

 

In partnership with many museums throughout the country, including the National Museum of the American Indian, the IARC launches “Guidelines for Collaboration,” an online resource for tribal communities and museums.

 

2017

2017

 

This year, School for Advanced Research celebrates its 110th year. Since its founding in 1907, SAR has played an important role in promoting the professionalization of anthropology and the recognition of Southwestern Native American arts and artists. It has also fostered discussion of globally important topics like population migration, and lead efforts among the museum community to encourage collaboration with indigenous peoples for the preservation and repatriation of cultural objects.