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Acequia

2006. Silvia Rodriguez

Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. The acequia or irrigation ditch associations of Taos, Río Arriba, Mora, and other northern New Mexico counties offer an alternative.

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Ambos Nogales

2002. Photographs by Maeve Hickey; Text by Lawrence Taylor

Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales.

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The Ancient City

2008. Edited by Joyce Marcus and Jeremy A. Sabloff

The essays in this volume — presented at a Sackler colloquium of the National Academy of Sciences — reveal that archaeologists now know much more about the founding and functions of ancient cities, their diverse trade networks, their heterogeneous plans and layouts, and their various lifespans and trajectories.

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Becoming Indian

2011. Circe Sturm

Becoming Indian explores the social and cultural values that lie behind this phenomenon and delves into the motivations of these Americans—from so many different walks of life—to reinscribe their autobiographies and find deep personal and collective meaning in reclaiming their Indianness.

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The Chaco Experience

2008. Ruth Van Dyke

The Chacoan landscape, with its formally constructed, carefully situated architectural features, is charged with symbolism. In this volume, Ruth Van Dyke analyzes the meanings and experience of moving through this landscape to illuminate Chacoan beliefs and social relationships.

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Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians

2004. Jill D. Sweet

This expanded edition features the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community.

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Fixing the Books

2015. Erin Debenport

This ethnographic study of emergent literacy provides a complex picture of secrecy, intellectual property, and the formation of publics through its examination of the relationships between prevailing linguistic ideologies, intertextual connections, and the contexts surrounding the production of indigenous language texts.

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The Flow of Power

2003. Vernon L. Scarborough

A major contribution to one of the central themes in social theory, this book integrates multiple case studies of the relationship between water control and social organization.

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The Futures of Our Pasts

2012. Edited by Michael A. Adler and Susan Benton Bruning

In the middle of this roiling debate over who has the right to collect and display antiquities, a group of scholars convened to debate differing perspectives on the ethics of antiquities collecting.

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Half-Lives & Half-Truths

2007. Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston

Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments.

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A History of the Navajos

1999. Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey

While many Native Americans have subordinated their tribal identity to their identity as Indians, unique historical circumstances have allowed the Navajos to maintain their uniqueness. This book examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation.

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The Information Continuum

1994. Barbara J. King

This volume creates a synthetic view of the evolution of communication among primates. King contends that the crucial element in the evolution of information acquisition and transfer is the acquired ability to donate information to others.

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Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe

2008. Edited, annotated, and introduced by Marit K. Munson

Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider’s portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe.

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Making Disasters

2015. Craig R. Janes and Oyuntsetseg Chuluundorj

The authors analyze a broad range of phenomena that are fundamentally linked to the adverse social and economic consequences of climate change, including urbanization and urban poverty, access to essential health care and education, changes to gender roles (especially for women), rural economic development and resource extraction, and public health more generally.

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Más Que un Indio (More Than an Indian)

2006. Charles R. Hale

This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects.

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Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition

2005. J. J. Brody

In this revised edition, noted Mimbres scholar Dr. J. J. Brody incorporates the extensive fieldwork done since the original publication in 1977, updating his discussion of village life, the larger world in which the Mimbres people lived, and how the art that they practiced illuminates these wider issues.

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The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems

2007. Edited by Timothy A. Kohler and Sander E. van der Leeuw

This book is about new developments in applying dynamic models for understanding relatively small-scale human systems and the environments they inhabit and alter. Beginning with a complex systems approach, the authors develop a “model-based archaeology” that uses specific, generally quantitative models providing partial descriptions of socionatural systems of interest that are then examined against those systems.

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Orayvi Revisited

1992. Jerrold E. Levy

Challenging the widely held view of the Hopi Indians of Arizona as a sober, peaceful, and cooperative people with an egalitarian social organization, Levy examines the 1906 split in the Third Mesa village of Orayvi.

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Our Lives

2014. Jennifer A. Shannon

It is a narrowly focused account of a particular kind of curatorial practice called “community curating.” It is also an account of many different people struggling to do their best under the weight of a monumental task: to represent all Native peoples of the Americas in the first institution of its kind, a national museum dedicated to the first peoples of the hemisphere.

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A Pueblo Social History

2014. John A. Ware; foreword by Timothy Earle

This volume offers new perspectives on the pithouse to pueblo transition, Chaco phenomenon, evolution of Rio Grande moieties, Western Pueblo lineages and clans, Katsina cult, great kivas, dynamics of village aggregation in the late prehistoric period, and much more.

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The Work of Sovereignty

2010. David Kamper

This volume explores the political, economic, and cultural forces that structure and influence indigenous economic development, giving special attention to the perspectives and priorities of the indigenous working people who build tribal futures with their everyday labor.

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Yanomami Warfare

1995. R. Brian Ferguson

These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present.

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