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Aboriginal Business

2009. Kimberly Christen

From the vantage point of the remote Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek in Australia, this book examines the practical partnerships and awkward alliances that constitute Indigenous modernities. It is an ethnographic snapshot of the Warumungu people as they engage with a range of interlocutors, including transnational railroad companies, national mining groups, international tourists, and regional businesses.

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Afro-Atlantic Dialogues

2006. Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington

This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology.

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Beyond Red Power

2007. Edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler

How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? Within this one story of indigenous persistence are many stories of local, regional, national, and international activism that require a nuanced understanding of what it means to be an activist or to act in politically purposeful ways.

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Cowboys & Cave Dwellers

1997. Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson

In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation’s priceless archaeological heritage.

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El Delirio

1998. Gregor Stark and E. Catherine Rayne

Richly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs, El Delirio offers an appealing glimpse into a fascinating period of Santa Fe history. It is also a loving portrait of the remarkable, energetic, and strong-willed Elizabeth White, described by a friend as “one of the great women of the Southwest in a very small body.”

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History in Person

2001. Edited by Dorothy Holland and Jean Lave

Nine ethnographers address such topics as the politically sexualized transformation of identities of women political prisoners in Northern Ireland; the changing character of political activism across generations in a Guatemala Mayan family; the cultural forms that mediate the struggles of working-class men on shop floors in England; and class and community struggles between the state and grassroots activists in New York.

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A History of the Navajos

1999. Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey

While many Native Americans have subordinated their tribal identity to their identity as Indians, unique historical circumstances have allowed the Navajos to maintain their uniqueness. This book examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation.

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Imperial Formations

2007. Edited by Ann Stoler, Carole McGranahan, and Peter Perdue

Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies.

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Indians & Energy

2010. Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner

This book explores the ways people have transformed natural resources in the American Southwest into fuel supplies for human consumption. Not only do Native Americans possess a large percentage of the Southwest’s total acreage, but much of the nation’s coal, oil, and uranium resources reside on tribal lands.

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Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe

2008. Edited, annotated, and introduced by Marit K. Munson

Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider’s portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe.

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Law & Empire in the Pacific

2004. Edited by Sally Engle Merry and Donald Brenneis

Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty.

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Linking the Histories of Slavery

2015. Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

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Making Alternative Histories

1995. Edited by Peter R. Schmidt and Thomas C. Patterson

In Making Alternative Histories, eleven scholars from Africa, India, Latin America, North America, and Europe debate and discuss how to respond to the erasures of local histories by colonialism, neocolonial influences, and the practice of archaeology and history as we know them today in North America and much of the Western world.

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Memory, History, and Opposition under State Socialism

1994. Edited by Rubie S. Watson

Eight anthropologists, sociologists, and historians probe the oppositional narratives created by Chinese rural intellectuals, èmigrè Croats, and organized dissenters such as the Djilas of Yugoslavia who constructed and maintained oppositional histories in state socialist societies.

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Mimbres Lives and Landscapes

2010. Edited by Margaret C. Nelson and Michelle Hegmon

Beginning with an overview of the abrupt change in lifestyle that launched the distinctive Mimbres culture, the book explores the lives of men and women, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of their dramatic pottery designs.

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Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875

2010. David M. Brugge

Combining archaeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest – the Catholic Church – to shed light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation.

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“Our Indian Princess”

2009. Nancy Marie Mithlo

In this pathbreaking study, anthropologist Nancy Marie Mithlo examines the power of stereotypes, the utility of pan-Indianism, the significance of realist ideologies, and the employment of alterity in Native American arts.

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A Peculiar Alchemy

2007. Nancy Owen Lewis and Kay Leigh Hagan; Preface by James F. Brooks

This book brings to life the people, debates, conflicts, and creativity that make the School for Advanced Research an exciting and thought-provoking place to study, work, and create. It serves at once as the story of an exceptional institution and a fascinating history of anthropology and anthropology’s diverse cast of characters.

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Pluralizing Ethnography

2004. Edited by John M.Watanabe and Edward F. Fischer

This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala.

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The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented

2010. Sarah Bronwen Horton

Through close readings of canonical texts by New Mexican historian Fray Angélico Chávez about La Conquistadora, a fifteenth-century Marian icon to whom legend credits Don Diego De Vargas’s “peaceful” resettlement, and through careful attention to the symbolic action of the event, this book explores the tropes of gender, time, genealogy, and sexuality through which this form of cultural nationalism is imagined.

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Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City

2008. Edited by David Grant Noble

Drawing on recent archaeological discoveries and historical research, this updated edition of a classic history details the town’s founding, its survival through revolt and reconquest, its turbulent politics, its lively trade with Mexico and the United States, and the lives of its most important citizens, from the governors Peralta, Vargas, and Armijo to the madam doña Tules.

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Small Worlds

2008. Edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, & John Walton

Urging the recognition of potential commonalities among archaeology, history, sociology, and anthropology, the authors propose that historical interpretation should move freely across disciplines, historical study should be held up to the present, and individual lives should be understood as the intersection of biography and history.

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The Work of Sovereignty

2010. David Kamper

This volume explores the political, economic, and cultural forces that structure and influence indigenous economic development, giving special attention to the perspectives and priorities of the indigenous working people who build tribal futures with their everyday labor.

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Yanomami Warfare

1995. R. Brian Ferguson

These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present.

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