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Catastrophe & Culture

2002. Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith

Using a variety of natural and technological disasters-including Mexican earthquakes, drought in the Andes and in Africa, the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Oakland firestorm, and the Bhopal gas disaster-the authors of this volume explore the potentials of disaster for ecological, political-economic, and cultural approaches to anthropology along with the perspectives of archaeology and history.

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Community Building in the Twenty-First Century

2005. Edited by Stanley E. Hyland

“Community” has long been a critical concept for social scientists, and never more so amid the growing economic inequity, natural and human disasters, and warfare of the opening years of the twenty-first century. In this volume, leading scholar-activists develop a conceptual framework for both the theory and practice of building communities.

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Confronting Cancer

2009. Edited by Juliet McMullin and Diane Weiner

In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail.

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Dangerous Liaisons

2011. Edited by Laura McNamara and Robert A. Rubinstein

Throughout the first decade of the twenty-first century, anthropologists have watched with both interest and concern as government agencies — particularly those with military and intelligence functions — have sought their professional assistance in understanding terrorists’ motivations, stabilizing nascent wartime governments, and countering insurgencies.

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Development & Dispossession

2009. Edited by Anthony Oliver-Smith

Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions.

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The Evolution of Political Systems

1990. Edited by Steadman Upham

The contributors to this book rely on archaeological and ethnographic case studies to examine the social, economic, and political processes behind the development of these “middle-range” political systems, located on a continuum between communally organized hunter-gatherer bands and stratified, centralized chiefdoms and states.

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Global Health in Times of Violence

2009. Edited by Barbara Rylko-Bauer, Linda Whiteford, and Paul Farmer

By investigating the fields of violence that define our modern world, the authors are able to provide alternative global health paradigms that can be used to develop more effective policies and programs.

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Globalization, Water, & Health

2005. Edited by Linda Whiteford and Scott Whiteford

Drawing on expertise in medical and ecological anthropology, the contributors challenge and deepen our understanding of the management, sale, and conceptualization of water as it affects human health. Designed for use by policymakers as well as researchers and students, the essays present complex realities in clear, accessible terms.

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Gray Areas

2003. Edited by Philip B. Stafford

This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living.

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Half-Lives & Half-Truths

2007. Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston

Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments.

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Indians & Energy

2010. Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner

This book explores the ways people have transformed natural resources in the American Southwest into fuel supplies for human consumption. Not only do Native Americans possess a large percentage of the Southwest’s total acreage, but much of the nation’s coal, oil, and uranium resources reside on tribal lands.

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(Mis)managing Migration

2014. Edited by David Griffith

Managed migration enables nation-states to regulate population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands. Unfortunately, managed migration does not always work on the ground as well as it does on paper.

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Otros Saberes

2014. Edited by Charles R. Hale and Lynn Stephen

The six research projects that form the core of the Otros Saberes initiative bring together a diverse group of Afro-descendant and indigenous collaborations with academics. The focus of each research project is driven by a strategic priority in the life of the community, organization, or social movement concerned.

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Remaking Life & Death

2003. Edited by Sarah Franklin and Margaret Lock

This volume reflects a growing international concern about issues such as organ transplantation, new reproductive and genetic technologies and embryo research, and the necessity of cross-cultural comparison.

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