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Events

Sep
26
Wed
2018
Advanced Seminar Presentation on Death Culture in the 21st Century @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Sep 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

Shannon L. Dawdy, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago, and Tamara E. Kneese. Lecturer, Department of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, University of California – Davis

How is the experience of death and mourning changing under conditions of growing religious plurality and secularization, technological mediation, and globalization? Cultures throughout history have deployed different media and objects to communicate with and remember the dead — from heirlooms, inscription, mementos, music, clothing and architecture to photography, telegraphy, television and the internet. This presentation provides an overview of seminarians’ work to address how the dead continue to shape the world around us through these forms — and, most importantly, how and why that assemblage is changing.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
3
Wed
2018
Resource Extraction and Relational Futures in Diné Bikeyah @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

Melanie Yazzie, Assistant Professor, Department of Native American Studies and the Department of American Studies, University of New Mexico, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR

Melanie Yazzie

Melanie Yazzie courtesy of UC-Riverside

The defenders of Diné land have opposed large-scale resource extraction in the Navajo Nation for over forty years. Throughout their resistance, they argued that development is a violent arm of capitalism that seeks to destroy Diné life; in response, they created a politics of relational life to contest and ultimately reverse the decline of Diné ways of being. In this talk, Melanie Yazzie examines the historical and material conditions that gave rise to this politics of relational life and describes its central role in anti-capitalist decolonization struggles in Diné Bikeyah and beyond.

 

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
10
Wed
2018
“Blessed Amongst Us”: The Politics of Popular Religious Migration @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

William Calvo-Quiros, Assistant Professor, Department of American Culture and Latino Studies, University of Michigan, and Mellon Resident Scholar, SAR

William A. Calvo-Quiros courtesy of himself

William A. Calvo-Quiros, courtesy of himself

Narco saints and skeletons in hats. Mexican martyrs and executed rapists. What type of saints are these, and what do they really represent in the US-Mexico borderlands? William Calvo-Quiros spent ten years tracing the movement and evolution of meaning of popular saints from Mexico to the United States. Using a chronological approach, Calvo-Quiros analyzes five vernacular saint figures (Jesús Malverde, Santa Olguita, Juan Soldado, Toribio Romo, and La Santa Muerte) within broader discourses: the construction of masculinity and the state; the long history of violence against women in the region; the erasure of women from history; the major US demographic and religious shifts generated by the influx of new Catholic Latinx immigrants; the discrimination against nonnormative sexualities; and the United States’ and Mexico’s formal and informal control of religiosity in relation to migration. This presentation unveils not only the politics and struggles behind border popular religiosity, but also its sophisticated role in envisioning a future beyond oppression.

 

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
11
Thu
2018
Creative Thought Forum Lecture: Connecting Science, Technology, and Culture in Education @ James A. Little Theater
Oct 11 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Creative Thought Forum lectures are free for SAR members and $10 for not-yet-members.

Register in advance here.

Leah Buechley

Leah Buechley

Computer scientist and former science director of MIT’s High-Low Tech research group, Leah Buechley, explores gender equity in Makerspaces. From e-textiles to paper circuits, Buechley shows how tech using traditional cultural practices—weaving or papermaking—can invite new questions about authority and accessibility.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to this lecture and other benefits, click here.

SAR SALON: Friday, October 12, 2018 Salons are offered on the morning following each Creative Thought Forum lecture. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker for a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to register for the salon call 505-954-7231.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

Image above: Interactive electronic wallpaper. Photo courtesy of Leah Buechley.

This Lecture Sponsored By:

New Mexico Bank & Trust
Shiprock Santa Fe

Oct
12
Fri
2018
Creative Thought Forum Salon: Connecting Science, Technology, and Culture in Education @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 12 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Creative Thought Forum Salon: Connecting Science, Technology, and Culture in Education @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

The Friday following the lecture, SAR hosts an informal salon discussion with Leah Buechley. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker and provides a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participants will be sent a brief selection of readings prior to the event so that they can familiarize themselves with the speaker’s work.

Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to RSVP for the salon call 505-954-7231 or email archuleta@sarsf.org.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to lectures and other benefits, click here.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

Oct
17
Wed
2018
SuperNatureCulture: Human/Nonhuman Entanglements beyond the Secular @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

Mayanthi Fernando, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California – Santa Cruz, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR

Mayanthi Fernando

Mayanthi Fernando courtesy of UC – Santa Cruz

Why are scholars more open to accepting mosquitos, mollusks, and mountains—rather than angels, djinn, and other spirits—as historical actors with whom humans are always in relation? How does secular knowledge focusing on “the real,” that which is material and visible, make it difficult to think of “the supernatural” as part of nature and culture? And how might we re-entangle the supernatural with the human and the natural? This exploratory talk examines how and why multispecies and post-humanist scholarship expands definitions of being yet restricts other-than-humans to entities that have been understood as part of “the natural.” Reading against the grain and alongside traditions like the Islamic sciences of the unseen, Mayanthi Fernando argues that recent trends in post-humanist scholarship offer epistemological horizons beyond those of secular materialism.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
18
Thu
2018
Advanced Seminar Panel Discussion Marital Rape in Global Context @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

In “Marital Rape in Global Context,” members of a 2018 advanced seminar, funded by the Vera R. Campbell Foundation, will present a panel discussion on their work. This new work, developed during a week of intense collaboration on SAR’s campus, explores groundbreaking practical strategies for enhancing women’s health and well-being.

Collaborative international research on rape within marriage demonstrates that women in widely divergent cultural and social contexts experience forced sex in their marital and cohabiting relationships as a form of social suffering with significant negative emotional and physical consequences that directly undermine their ability to live a good life. Deep knowledge of local cultures, as well as anthropology’s analysis of gender, kinship, consent, violence, and the state, is now beginning to inform gender-based violence work in disciplines such as sociology, legal studies, human rights, and public health.

Panelists will present the evolution of their ongoing research that began with the first scholarly examination of the global pandemic of rape in marriage: Marital Rape: Consent, Marriage and Social Change in Global Context (Oxford, 2016). The panel will be led by seminar chairs M. Gabriela Torres, associate professor of anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Wheaton College, and Kersti A. Yllö, emerita professor of sociology, Department of Sociology, Wheaton College.

A reception with light refreshments will be held following the discussion.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
24
Wed
2018
The Fourth Invasion: Development, Ixil-Maya Resistance, and the Struggle against Megaprojects in Guatemala @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

Giovanni Batz, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Miami University

Giovanni Batz

Giovanni Batz by Monika Banach

Along with the global demand for natural resources and the influence of neoliberalism, foreign companies that produce energy and sponsor extra-activist industries in Latin America continue to grow. State officials, the private sector, and other supporters of megaprojects argue that these initiatives foster development, employment, and living conditions, as well as creating clean and renewable sources of energy. Yet many indigenous communities, human rights organizations, and other opponents claim that these industries do not further development and instead contribute to communal divisions, environmental degradation, human rights violations, and militarization. In Cotzal, Guatemala, the arrival of several megaprojects has been referred to as the “new” or “fourth” invasion—the three previous invasions being Spanish colonization, the creation of plantations at the end of the nineteenth century, and the Guatemalan civil war (1960–1996). In this presentation, Giovanni Batz will provide a historical account of these “four invasions” with an emphasis on the conflict surrounding the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Cotzal.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Oct
31
Wed
2018
Aesthetics and Agency: Mexican Migration and Housing Form and Policy in Suburban Atlanta @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

John Arroyo, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

John Arroyo

John Arroyo by KCET Departures

Where Mexican immigrants live in the United States plays a critical role in how they adapt to their host society—and how their host society reacts to their presence in a physical context. Over the past twenty years, the mobility patterns of surging Mexican populations across Georgia have had a major influence on suburban space. Based on two years of ethnographic research, John Arroyo examines how fear, invisibility, and agency manifest across the residential built environments of newly Mexican areas of greater Atlanta and explores how Mexican-origin people either adapted to or reshaped suburban housing at various scales. Additionally, he shows how the spatial ideals of Latino urbanism foment reactionary land use and zoning policies throughout small suburban municipalities on Atlanta’s periphery. In a twenty-first-century America defined by exponential Latino-community growth, this emergent case study illustrates how Mexican-origin populations navigate the challenges of urbanism when settling in places unprepared for seismic population shifts.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Nov
7
Wed
2018
Do Androids Dream of Electric Speech? Listening Practices in Automated Psychiatric Assessment @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Nov 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

To register for this event, please click here.

Beth Semel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Beth Semel by Elena Sobrino

Beth Semel by Elena Sobrino

What does it mean for machines to listen? What kind of listeners do the people who build artificial intelligence–enabled machines train them to be? After all, Amazon’s Alexa is only “listening” in the same way that she is a “she.” Drawing from extended ethnographic fieldwork with psychiatric and engineering professionals in the United States, Beth Semel argues that the concept of machine listening is both a powerful and strategically vague analogy that articulates taken-for-granted assumptions about human listening and the speaking subject. While listening technologies are central to contemporary debates about ethics and automation, Semel’s examination of the behind-the-screen labor through which a set of such technologies is assembled reveals their entanglement with deeper histories and political economies of engineering, speech science, and care work in the United States.

This event is free and open to the public. The presentation will take place in the Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom on the SAR campus. Advanced registration is encouraged.

To register for this event, please click here.

Jan
24
Thu
2019
Creative Thought Forum Lecture: Chacoan Astronomy, Cosmography, Roads, and Ritual Power: Insights into the Chaco World Using New Technologies @ James A. Little Theater
Jan 24 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Creative Thought Forum lectures are free for SAR members and $10 for not-yet-members.

Register in advance here.

Anna Sofaer

Anna Sofaer

Anna Sofaer and her colleagues, Robert Weiner and Richard Friedman, present their work on the Solstice Project, a nonprofit dedicated to the study of astronomical heritage in Chaco Canyon culture. Using traditional approaches and emerging technologies (LIDAR and 3D modeling), their work reveals new ways of exploring this history.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to this lecture and other benefits, click here.

SAR SALON: Friday, January 25, 2019 Salons are offered on the morning following each Creative Thought Forum lecture. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker for a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to register for the salon call 505-954-7231.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

Image above: Low oblique aerial view of Pueblo Alto, one of the Great House ruins in Chaco Culture National Historical Park. The ruin is in the foreground of this view to the north, with traces of prehistoric roads clearly visible in the middle distance under the raking morning light. Photo by Adriel Heisey, courtesy of Anna Sofaer.

This Lecture Sponsored By:

Dan Merians & Tamara Bates UBS Financial Services
Bank of Albuquerque
Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery
Shiprock Santa Fe

 

Jan
25
Fri
2019
Creative Thought Forum Salon: Chacoan Astronomy, Cosmography, Roads, and Ritual Power @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Jan 25 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Creative Thought Forum Salon: Chacoan Astronomy, Cosmography, Roads, and Ritual Power @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

The Friday following the lecture, SAR hosts an informal salon discussion with Anna Sofaer. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker and provides a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participants will be sent a brief selection of readings prior to the event so that they can familiarize themselves with the speaker’s work.

Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to RSVP for the salon call 505-954-7231 or email archuleta@sarsf.org.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to lectures and other benefits, click here.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

Mar
21
Thu
2019
Creative Thought Forum Lecture: From ‘Garden Warriors’ to ‘Good Seeds;’ Indigenizing the Local Food Movement @ James A. Little Theater
Mar 21 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Creative Thought Forum lectures are free for SAR members and $10 for not-yet-members.

Register in advance here.

Elizabeth Hoover. Photo by Adam Sings In The Timber

Elizabeth Hoover. Photo by Adam Sings In The Timber

Elizabeth Hoover explores traditional food practices in Native American communities and the impact of environmental studies on modern food production. Hoover’s community-engaged research at Brown University examines issues of environmental justice, indigenous farming, and subsistence revival movements.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to this lecture and other benefits, click here.

SAR SALON: Friday, March 22, 2019 Salons are offered on the morning following each Creative Thought Forum lecture. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker for a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to register for the salon call 505-954-7231.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

 


This Lecture Sponsored By:

Walter Burke Catering
KUNM 89.9 FM
Shiprock Santa Fe

 

Mar
22
Fri
2019
Creative Thought Forum Salon: From ‘Garden Warriors’ to ‘Good Seeds;’ Indigenizing the Local Food Movement @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Mar 22 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Creative Thought Forum Salon: From ‘Garden Warriors’ to ‘Good Seeds;’ Indigenizing the Local Food Movement @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

The Friday following the lecture, SAR hosts an informal salon discussion with Elizabeth Hoover. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker and provides a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participants will be sent a brief selection of readings prior to the event so that they can familiarize themselves with the speaker’s work.

Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to RSVP for the salon call 505-954-7231 or email archuleta@sarsf.org.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to lectures and other benefits, click here.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

May
23
Thu
2019
Creative Thought Forum Annual President’s Lecture: Minds in the Net: The Journey from Page to Screen @ James A. Little Theater
May 23 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

The Creative Thought Forum Annual President’s Lecture is $10 for members and $20 for not-yet-members.

Nicholas Carr. Photo by Scott Keneally.

Nicholas Carr. Photo by Scott Keneally.

Register in advance here.

New York Times best-selling author Nicholas Carr explores the development of the internet and the role it has played in shaping how we think, work, and live. Carr’s work often explores the impact of technologies, including smartphones, computers, and tablets, on our cognitive abilities and the potential troubles that arise from the expanded use of the internet. He was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in the category of nonfiction for his recent book, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. Carr’s 2008 book, The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, From Edison to Google, explores the cultural significance and the potential economic consequences of expanding use of internet-based cloud computing.

“We have never been so intimately involved with a media technology as we are with the smartphone. We consult it every few minutes throughout the day and check it one last time before going to bed. What is this technological dependency doing to our minds?”

Nicholas Carr

 

SAR SALON: Friday, January 25, 2019 Salons are offered on the morning following each Creative Thought Forum lecture. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker for a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to register for the salon call 505-954-7231.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.


This Lecture Sponsored By:

Michelle Cook & John Camp
Dan Merians & Tamara Bates, UBS Financial Services