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Events

Oct
5
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: Making Tropical Africa in the Georgia Sea Islands @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 5 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Paulla Ebron, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, and SAR’s 2022 Wenner-Gren fellow.

Paulla Ebron, SAR Wenner-Gren Fellow, 2022-2023

Paulla Ebron
2022 – 2023
Wenner-Gren Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award: Associate Professor Department of Anthropology Stanford University

Making Tropical Africa in the Georgia Sea Islands

Dr. Ebron utilizes extensive ethnographic field work and archival research to explore how the Gullah-Geechee region of the southeastern United States came into being—and continues to shape Black culture. During this process, she considers three kinds of region making: cultural representations, which contribute to a sense of collective “memory”; landscape reformations through the plantation economy; and political mobilizations for literacy and civil rights.

 

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Oct
6
Thu
2022
Creative Thought Forum | Footprints from White Sands: Discovery, Dating, and Significance @ Online
Oct 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

Register here.

LINDA S. CORDELL LECTURE
Footprints from White Sands: Discovery, Dating, and Significance
Matthew Bennett, David Bustos, Vance Holliday

When David Bustos, archaeologist and resource program manager at White Sands National Park, discovered prehistoric human footprints at White Sands in 2009, he did not expect that they would later be dated to the Last Glacial Maximum (26,000–19,000 years ago). At the time, most archaeological data suggested that humans arrived in the Americas 15,000 to 13,000 years ago. This tremendous discovery pushes back the clock almost 10,000 years, challenging long-held views about the earliest human occupation of North America. Join Bustos and two members of the team that documented and researched the footprints, Matthew Bennett and Vance Holliday, in an online presentation followed by a Q&A to learn about their discovery and research methods.

Matthew Bennett, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental and geographical sciences at Bournemouth University, UK, and has been published widely on aspects of glaciology, sedimentology, and geomorphology. Bennett has worked on human footprint projects throughout the world. His paper about the White Sands footprints and human presence in the Americas during the Last Glacial Maximum was published in Science in 2021.

Archaeologist David Bustos is the resource program manager at White Sands National Park and a graduate of New Mexico State University. He is responsible for the management of the park’s cultural and natural resources and has investigated ancient human and megafauna footprints throughout the park for more than a decade.

Vance Holliday, Ph.D., is professor of anthropology and geosciences at the University of Arizona. Holliday directs the Argonaut Archaeological Research Fund (AARF), which is devoted to research on the geoarchaeology of the Paleoindian people of the Southwest. His career is largely devoted to reconstructing and interpreting the landscapes and environments in which the First Americans lived, and how these conditions evolved.

This event is presented by the Linda S. Cordell lecture fund.

Oct
19
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: Indian Muslim Poetry, Ethics, and Politics in an Age of Hindu Nationalism @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 19 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Anand Taneja, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University, and SAR’s 2022 Weatherhead Fellow

Anand Taneja, SAR Weatherhead Fellow, 2022-2023

Anand Taneja
2022 – 2023
Weatherhead Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award: Assistant Professor Department of Religious Studies Vanderbilt University

Indian Muslim Poetry, Ethics, and Politics in an Age of Hindu Nationalism

Based on ethnographic engagement with diverse Muslim interlocutors between 2018 and 2020—and contrary to received wisdom of the causal link between oppression and Muslim violence—Dr. Taneja explores the vibrancy and creativity of Indian Muslim experiments with self-expression, inter-communal relationships, and political activism in Narendra Modi’s India. He examines how Urdu poetry is a unifying and authoritative mode of discourse which expresses political theologies of selfhood.

 

 

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Nov
2
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: Beyond the Trail of Broken Treaties: The International Native American Rights Movement, 1975-1980 @ Hosted online. Register below.
Nov 2 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Jennifer O’Neal, Assistant Professor, Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies, University of Oregon, and SAR’s 2022 Lamon fellow.

Jennifer O’Neal, SAR Katrin H. Lamon Fellow, 2022-2023

Jennifer O’Neal
2022 – 2023
Lamon Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award: Assistant Professor
Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies University of Oregon

Beyond the Trail of Broken Treaties: The International Native American Rights Movement, 1975-1980

Dr. O’Neal’s project examines the transformative shift, beginning in the mid-1970s, of organized Native American and Indigenous groups within the United States and Canada to internationalize Indigenous activism. Utilizing an Indigenous feminist approach, this work argues that Native American activism after the Red Power Movement shifted significantly from a domestic agenda to an international Indigenous initiative seeking increased sovereignty, self-determination, and human rights through global political relationships and partnerships, both within and outside the nation-state. Based on extensive archival research and in-depth activist interviews, the study specifically focuses on the role of Native American activists within organized groups that developed strong networks and exchanges in the Indigenous international arena.

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Nov
16
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: The Erased Homeland: Mexicans’ Long Past, the Southern Great Plains, and America’s Future @ Hosted online. Register below.
Nov 16 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Joel Zapata, Assistant Professor, School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, Oregon State University, and SAR’s 2022 Mellon fellow.

Joel Zapata, SAR Mellon Fellow, 2022-2023

Joel Zapata
2022 – 2023
Mellon Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award:
Assistant Professor
School of History, Philosophy, and Religion Oregon State University

The Erased Homeland: Mexicans’ Long Past, the Southern Great Plains, and America’s Future

The United States’ Mexican population has come to the forefront of public and academic exchanges amidst the past two presidential campaigns and ensuing political debates regarding immigration policy and border security. Yet, these discussions consistently neglect Mexicans’ long-term history in what is now the United States, along with their enduring social influence throughout the nation. Using manuscript materials from over twenty archives spread across the United States, personal papers, hundreds of archived and original oral histories, combined with art, photographs, print media, archeological studies, songs, and folklore, Dr. Zapata follows the physical, economic, cultural, and even emotional connections ethnic Mexicans have long had with the plains. His project reveals how Mexican people have made the Southern Plains into one of their homelands since the late eighteenth century.

 

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Nov
29
Tue
2022
President’s Lecture: Dan Flores, Wild New World: The Epic Story of Animals and People in the America @ Lensic Performing Arts Center
Nov 29 @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm
President's Lecture: Dan Flores, Wild New World: The Epic Story of Animals and People in the America @ Lensic Performing Arts Center | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Wild New World: The Epic Story of Animals and People in America
Presentation by Dan Flores
Conversation to follow with Dan Flores and Sara Dant

In a unique presentation, including selected readings and an on-stage discussion with Sara Dant, writer, historian, and former professor Dan Flores will engage topics such as why America no longer has elephants, how Native people sustained American diversity across 10,000 years, why Euro-Americans were so committed to destroying the continent’s wolves, and how religion and free-market capitalism allowed the United States to engage in the most massive destruction of animal life in modern history. Flores’s presentation and the discussion draw from his new book, an ambitious Big History of how we humans responded to the grand bestiary of American creatures that emerged in the wake of the Chicxulub Impact. Wild New World is a narrative history that begins in deep time and extends into America’s present time.

Dan Flores, Ph.D., is a writer, historian, and former professor who lives near Santa Fe and is A.B. Hammond Professor Emeritus of the History of the American West at the University of Montana-Missoula. Flores is the author of ten books including the New York Times bestseller and finalist for Pen America’s E.O. Wilson Prize in Literary Science Writing, Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History and the Amazon bestseller American Serengeti, winner of the Stubbendieck Distinguished Book Prize.

Sara Dant, Ph.D., is Brady Presidential Distinguished Professor and Chair of History at Weber State University. Her work focuses on environmental politics in the United States with an emphasis on the creation and development of consensus and bipartisanism. Dant’s latest book is Losing Eden: An Environmental History of the American West about the interaction between people and nature. Dant is also an advisor and interviewee for Ken Burns’s The American Buffalo documentary film and the author of several articles on western environmental politics.

Nov
30
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: Grandmothering Midwives: Negotiation, Legislation, and Medical Authority in the New Mexico Birthing Room, 1880–1950 @ Hosted online. Register below.
Nov 30 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Gianna May Sanchez, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Michigan, and SAR’s 2022 Mellon Fellow.

Gianna May Sanchez, SAR Mellon Fellow,, 2022-2023

Gianna May Sanchez
2022 – 2023
Mellon Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award: PhD Candidate Department of History University of Michigan

“Grandmothering Midwives: Negotiation, Legislation, and Medical Authority in the New Mexico Birthing Room, 1880–1950”

May Sanchez’s project, “Grandmothering Midwives: Negotiation, Legislation, and Medical Authority in the New Mexico Birthing Room, 1880 – 1950,” examines curanderismo, midwifery, and medical professionalization in New Mexico. It addresses the state’s reliance upon traditional healers and midwives during the twentieth century, and how these women were vital in meeting the medical needs of women and children in the state, especially for rural, Mexican American communities. It examines the varied responses from the medical community, public health officials, and midwives to reduce the high rates of infant and maternal mortality from 1920s – 1940s, and how this concern over public health sustained the practice of midwifery far into the latter half of the century, contrary to the national historiographical narrative of medical professionalization.

 

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Dec
14
Wed
2022
Scholar Colloquium: “It Shows My Way”: Roads, Religion, and Power in the Chaco World @ Hosted online. Register below.
Dec 14 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Robert Weiner, PhD candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and SAR’s 2022 Paloheimo fellow.

Robert Weiner, SAR Paloheimo Fellow, 2022-2023

Robert Weiner
2022 – 2023
Paloheimo Fellow
Affiliation at time of Award: PhD Candidate
Department of Anthropology University of Colorado Boulder

“It Shows My Way”: Roads, Religion, and Power in the Chaco World

Weiner’s project bridges archaeology, cultural anthropology, cognitive science, and religious studies to investigate the role of monumental roads associated with Chaco Canyon in the U.S. Southwest. His research explores issues of monumentality, power, and religion, asking how roads—and specifically, the practices carried out along them—contributed to Chaco’s unequal, regionally-influential society. Weiner’s field investigations over four years, carried out in collaboration with the Navajo Nation, revealed a distinctive suite of architectural features and artifact deposits along Chacoan roads. Interpreted in light of Diné and Pueblo traditional knowledge and cross-cultural examples of ceremonial roadways, these findings suggest roads were loci of ritual processions, offerings, and races. His research also shows that Chacoan roads demarcated alignments to landforms and astronomical bodies, connected non-contemporaneous sites, and prescribed movement at multiple scales—thereby inscribing enduring traces of Chacoan hierarchy and cosmography on the landscape.

 

This event is part of the 2022 fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

See the full series here

Jan
19
Thu
2023
Creative Thought Forum | Women of the Lost Territory: New Mexico Women of the Past, Present, Future with Flannery Burke and guest @ New Mexico History Museum
Jan 19 @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm

Flannery Burke

Women of the Lost Territory: New Mexico Women of the Past and Present
Flannery Burke and guest

6:00 p.m. Doors open, light reception in lobby
6:30 p.m. Presentation begins in auditorium

Flannery Burke will discuss women in New Mexico history, addressing some of the usual suspects—Georgia O’Keeffe, Maria Martinez, Nina Otero-Warren—and how their stories help us to uncover those of lesser-known women whose life histories have been lost in the triple colonization of New Mexico by Spain, Mexico, and the United States. Burke and a guest speaker, also knowledgeable about women in New Mexico’s history and present, will also examine the landscape of women in New Mexico today.

Flannery Burke, Ph.D., is an associate professor at Saint Louis University in the Department of American Studies. Her books include A Land Apart: The Southwest and the Nation in the Twentieth Century and From Greenwich Village to Taos: Primitivism and Place at Mabel Dodge Luhan’s. Burke is committed to sharing the indigenous and Spanish-speaking cultures of the American Southwest widely and incorporating those cultures and their histories into the regional, national, and global stories that scholars tell. Her current book project is a history of how twentieth-century writers in the American West imagined the American East.

Feb
9
Thu
2023
Creative Thought Forum | Angela Garcia, The War on Both Sides @ New Mexico History Museum
Feb 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm

Angela Garcia

MELLON LECTURE
The War on Both Sides

Angela Garcia

6:00 p.m. Doors open, light reception in lobby
6:30 p.m. Presentation begins in auditorium

This presentation considers the “drug war” from the vantage of two sites—a village in northern New Mexico and a working-class neighborhood in Mexico City. It examines the unorthodox ways families care for addicted relatives and demonstrates how these are inseparable from broader social and political arrangements. In thinking comparatively about these two sites, this talk raises urgent questions about the nature of addiction, violence, care, and commitment.

Angela Garcia, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her work engages historical and institutional processes through which violence and suffering is produced and lived. Her book, The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along the Rio Grande received the 2012 Victor Turner Prize and a 2010 Pen Center USA Award. The Pastoral Clinic explores the relationship between intergenerational heroin use, poverty, and colonial history in Northern New Mexico.

Special thanks to the Mellon Foundation and the Paloheimo Foundation for their support of this program.

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