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Classes: SAR In Depth

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides. Full descriptions and dates for these classes are listed below along with registration information.

Fall 2019

Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico

Course Description:

Shield Figure with Four Pointed Star, Mesa Prieta

Shield figure with four pointed star, Mesa Prieta. Photo by Curt Schaafsma.

Explore the history and evolution of rock art across the Rio Grande Basin with archaeologist, Richard Ford. This four-part course introduces participants to a wide range of rock art including Paleo-Indian, Early/Middle/Late Archaic, historic Pueblo, and the migratory Plains style. Learn how to identify rock art, record the works, and where to find nearby examples. This course is presented in four parts:

October 1: Cupules (their manufacture and meaning) with class demonstration
– Paleo-Indian rock art: what it means and where you find it
– Conventions and protocol for recording rock art

October 8: Archaic Rock Art
– The importance of shamanism and sacred shrines in the Archaic, the meaning of abstract art, and the Rowe Mesa rock art tour
– Early Archaic
– Middle Archaic
– Late Archaic and Transitional rock art

October 15: Ancestral Pueblo imagery: styles, meaning, and history

October 22: Historic Hispanic, Genízaro, and Catholic religious imagery
– Migratory Plains Indian rock art (Ute, Jicarilla Apache, and Comanche glyphs)
– Anglo-American images
– Where to find rock art in the greater Santa Fe area

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.

Course Leader:

Richard I. Ford

Richard Ford, Arthur F. Thurnau Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, completed his BA in anthropology at Oberlin College and then his PhD in anthropology at the University of Michigan, where he rose to the rank of full professor of anthropology and botany. While at Michigan, he had administrative appointments as curator of ethnology and director of the Ethnobotanical Laboratory in the Museum of Anthropology, director of the Museum of Anthropology, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, and associate dean of research and computing in the Literary College.

Professor Ford’s ethnobotanical research took him to Poland, Tunisia, Kenya, Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, China, and several Midwestern and Southwestern states. Based on this travel, he published 135 articles and chapters and nine research monographs.

He received numerous awards from professional organizations including the Amal Amique Award in India, Distinguished Ethnobiologist from the Society of Ethnobiology, the Fryxell Award from the Society of American Archaeology, the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous local honors.

Now residing in Santa Fe, Ford is an active lecturer and archaeology tour guide. He also serves as an expert witness for several pueblos in their land and water cases.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 1, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 8, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 15, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $175 for members; $225 for non-members; $150 for members registered for the September 26, 2019, member field trip.

Register for Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico here.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.


An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization

Course Description:

Yucatan: Maya Ruins and Fabulous Haciendas with Dr. William Saturno

Yucatan: Maya Ruins, Photo courtesy of Dr. William Saturno

How are recent archaeological studies exploring Pre-Columbian Maya civilization shaping our current understanding of the culture and history? Join Dr. Jeremy Sabloff in a 4-part course exploring the evolution of the field of Maya studies. From new discoveries unlocked through Maya hieroglyphic texts to developments in understanding the settlement patterns of urban centers, Maya archaeology has shifted archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at all classes and populations, as well as continuities in cultural development over 2 millennia.

This course is presented in four parts:

November 5: An overview of the history of research on the Pre-Columbian Maya and the changing foci of scholars over the past century;

November 7: An exploration of the development of ancient Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, and the environment, both natural and cultural, within which it grew as well as a concentration on the Preclassic Period (from about 1,000 B.C. to A.D. 250) and the rise of complex societies in the Maya area and its first cities;

November 12: A look at the Classic (A.D. 250-800) and Terminal Classic (A.D. 800-1,000) Periods including the growth of Maya cities such as Tikal and Caracol, the great achievements in art and architecture, the decline of cities in the Southern Lowlands and the florescence in the north;

November 14: And, an exploration of the Postclassic Period (A.D. 1,000 to 1519) including the economic and political developments at cities such as Chichen Itza and Mayapan and the consequences of the 16th century Spanish Conquest.

Course Leader:

Jerry Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry Sabloff received his Ph.D. In anthropology from Harvard University and his B.A. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania and an External Professor Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute. He is an archaeologist with particular interest in the ancient Maya and has written or edited more than 20 books and monographs (including 4 SAR volumes).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, November 5, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday, November 7, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, November 12, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday November 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

Register for An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization here.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Fall 2018

Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

Course Description:

In 1907 the Archaeological Institute of America supported the founding of a new

Jesse Nusbaum and Alfred V. Kidder, Mesa Verde, 1908. Photo courtesy of Faith Kidder Fuller.

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

PAST CLASSES

Spring 2018

After the Fall of Chaco Canyon Society—Four Centuries of Consequences

David E. Stuart

David E. Stuart
Photo by Jason Ordaz.

Course Description:
The 1100s to 1400s were a crucial time in the prehistoric American Southwest. The Chacoan world, a great power in the 1000s AD, unraveled, leaving decimated communities, violence, hunger, and refugees. Most of those refugees fled to the uplands in the 1100s. Then climate changes forced them to again reorganize. This course focuses on climate, well-being, methods of food production and the dynamics of change in communities, whose inhabitants learned that values of community and efficiency were more important than political and economic power. We will see and discuss parallels to current America.

Course Leaders:
David Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are Prehistoric New Mexico, Anasazi America, The Guaymas Chronicles, and the recently released Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau. He earned his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico (UNM) and served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs. Stuart served as acting president of SAR and has been a lecturer there and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City, and the Sorbonne in Paris.

Rory Gauthier retired from the National Park Service after more than thirty years working as an archaeologist, curator, and interpreter, along with ten years in law enforcement. During his park service years, he was assigned to Bandelier National Monument, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, Glen Canyon National Recreational Area, Petrified Forest National Park, and El Morro and El Malpais National Monuments. He has also worked on a number of archaeological projects throughout the southwestern US for the University of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. His archaeological interests have focused on the northern Rio Grande region and the subjects of pueblo agricultural traditions and pueblo migrations and adaptations. He is currently working with Aspen Cultural Resource Management Solutions in Santa Fe.

David Stuart and Rory Gauthier are co-authors of the ground-breaking work Prehistoric New Mexico.

Dates, Times, and Places:
Tuesday, February 27, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Wednesday, February 28, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, March 6, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Wednesday, March 7, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Friday, March 9, field trip to the Pajarito Plateau with Rory Gauthier for class participants. Costs and details for the trip to follow.

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for nonmembers.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

 


 

Pueblo Worlds: An Overview of Pueblo Society and Culture

Course Description:

John Ware

John Ware
© School for Advanced Research

When sixteenth-century Spanish explorers first set foot in what is now the southwestern U.S. they encountered people who lived in multistoried apartment buildings of stone and adobe enclosing communal plazas. The Spanish referred to these people as Pueblos (Spanish for towns), presumably to distinguish them from the residentially-mobile band and tribal groups of the greater Southwest. Despite similarities in architecture and settlement pattern, the people the Spanish called Pueblos speak six mutually unintelligible languages from four different language families, so they are not a monolithic culture but several different peoples who share cultural practices. The Pueblos have also shared more than a century of scrutiny by anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians attempting to sort out their convergent histories. It is likely that no other indigenous cultures in the world have been studied more intensively than the Pueblo people of the Southwest. Pueblo Worlds is a School for Advanced Research mini-course that will explore the many worlds of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Arizona.

Course Leader:
John Ware is an anthropologist and archaeologist whose teaching and research concerns focus on the indigenous cultures of the northern Southwest, where he has worked for almost 50 years. From 2001 until his retirement in 2014, Dr. Ware served as executive director of the Amerind Foundation in southern Arizona. Before that he directed the Laboratory of Anthropology and was founding director of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe. He is the author, most recently, of A Pueblo Social History: Kinship, Sodality, and Community in the Northern Southwest (SAR Press, 2014).

Dates, Times, and Places:
Tuesday, April 24, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, May 8, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, May 15, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday May 22, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non members.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

Fall 2017

Paul Ryer, Director of Scholar Programs

Photo courtesy of Paul Ryer.

Inside The Revolution: An Anthropological Approach to Contemporary Cuba

Course Leader: Paul Ryer, SAR Director of Scholar Programs
This course will investigate the nature of social life in Cuba today, within the historical and ethnographic context of a still-socialist revolutionary state in the Caribbean. After a brief historical overview of Cuban society before 1959, we will consider the formal and informal socialist economy established during the Soviet era; gender relations, racial identities, and migration; arts, material culture, religion, and politics within one of the more distinctive republics in the Americas today.

Combining lectures and discussion of related readings, the class is intended as a brief stand-alone introduction, but also to prepare participants for the subsequent SAR trip to Cuba, November 1-8, 2017. Both the class and the trip will be led by Dr. Paul Ryer, SAR director of scholar programs. Ryer was affiliated with the University of Havana and has conducted long-term research on Cuba and its diasporas.

All sessions meet from 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. in SAR’s Dobkin boardroom, 660 Garcia Street, Santa Fe, NM

Week One: Tuesday, Oct. 3
From Colony to Revolution

Week Two: Tuesday, Oct. 10
State Socialism

Week Three: Tuesday, Oct. 17
Daily Life in the Post-Soviet Era

Week Four: Tuesday, Oct. 24
Arts, Material Culture, Religion, and Politics Today

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

Spring 2017

David E. Stuart

Photo by Jason Ordaz.

From Casual Farmers to Chaco Canyon: Archaeology and the Dynamics of Prehistoric Four Corners Society

Course Leader: David Stuart
How did a few scattered families of part-time horticulturalists in about 1500 B.C. make modest decisions that would transform their descendants into the full-time farmers of the 900s A.D. who supported and shaped the rise of Chacoan Great House Society in the late 1000s A.D.? The answers involve ecology, climate, reproductive and social behaviors, massive amounts of labor, a penchant for problem-solving, and lots of innovation.

David Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are Prehistoric New Mexico, Anasazi America, The Guaymas Chronicles, and the recently released Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau. He earned his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs. Dr. Stuart served as acting president of SAR and has been a lecturer at SAR and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City, and at the Sorbonne in Paris.

Dates & Times
Tuesday, April 25, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 2, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 9, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 16, 3-5 p.m.

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