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Classes: SAR In Depth

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides. Full descriptions and dates for these classes are listed below along with registration information.

Fall 2018

Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

Course Description:

In 1907 the Archaeological Institute of America supported the founding of a new

Jesse Nusbaum and Alfred V. Kidder, Mesa Verde, 1908. Photo courtesy of Faith Kidder Fuller.

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.


Beadwork Adorns the World

Course Description:

Boy’s vest and pants, c. 1890, Lakota nation, North or South Dakota, USA Bob and Lora Sandroni Collection. Photograph by L.A. High Noon, Inc.

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants. Where they start out is seldom where they end up. Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of peoples far distant. No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

In most parts of the world, beads are used at peak moments in life. With their luster and sparkle, used as an adornment, a surface additive, or an entire composition, they help to heighten the impact and meaning of these peak moments. These special times in the life of the community tend to revolve around life stages and passages, such as birth, becoming an adult, marriage, and death; power, position, or status in the community; or communication with the spirits.

This course begins with an in-depth view of the beadwork traditions of the Lakota people, or Western Sioux, of the central Plains. The remaining sessions will be spent working with collections and exhibits. Dr. Marsha Bol will lead a comprehensive tour of the Beadwork Adorns the World exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art. Participants will enjoy an in-depth look at the Indian Arts Research Center’s collection of Native American beadwork and an inside-look at the Native American beadwork in the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Course Leader:

Dr. Marsha Bol

Dr. Marsha Bol is the former director of the Museum of International Folk Art, the largest international folk art museum in the world, holding 135,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Before that, she served as the director of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe for seven years. Dr. Bol started her museum career at the University of New Mexico’s Maxwell Museum of Anthropology as the curator of education, while she was completing her PhD in Native American art history. While curator of anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in the 1990s, she planned the new Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians. She then joined the faculty of the University of Texas at San Antonio as an associate professor.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Wednesday, September 5, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, September 11, 3-5 p.m., Museum of International Folk Art
Tuesday, September 18, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday, September 25, 3-5 p.m., Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 

Museum of New Mexico Foundation members and Museum of International Folk Art docents receive a 10% discount on the non-member registration cost.

 

Register for Beadwork Adorns the World

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

 

PAST CLASSES

Spring 2018

After the Fall of Chaco Canyon Society—Four Centuries of Consequences

David E. Stuart

David E. Stuart
Photo by Jason Ordaz.

Course Description:
The 1100s to 1400s were a crucial time in the prehistoric American Southwest. The Chacoan world, a great power in the 1000s AD, unraveled, leaving decimated communities, violence, hunger, and refugees. Most of those refugees fled to the uplands in the 1100s. Then climate changes forced them to again reorganize. This course focuses on climate, well-being, methods of food production and the dynamics of change in communities, whose inhabitants learned that values of community and efficiency were more important than political and economic power. We will see and discuss parallels to current America.

Course Leaders:
David Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are Prehistoric New Mexico, Anasazi America, The Guaymas Chronicles, and the recently released Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau. He earned his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico (UNM) and served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs. Stuart served as acting president of SAR and has been a lecturer there and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City, and the Sorbonne in Paris.

Rory Gauthier retired from the National Park Service after more than thirty years working as an archaeologist, curator, and interpreter, along with ten years in law enforcement. During his park service years, he was assigned to Bandelier National Monument, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, Glen Canyon National Recreational Area, Petrified Forest National Park, and El Morro and El Malpais National Monuments. He has also worked on a number of archaeological projects throughout the southwestern US for the University of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. His archaeological interests have focused on the northern Rio Grande region and the subjects of pueblo agricultural traditions and pueblo migrations and adaptations. He is currently working with Aspen Cultural Resource Management Solutions in Santa Fe.

David Stuart and Rory Gauthier are co-authors of the ground-breaking work Prehistoric New Mexico.

Dates, Times, and Places:
Tuesday, February 27, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Wednesday, February 28, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, March 6, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Wednesday, March 7, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Friday, March 9, field trip to the Pajarito Plateau with Rory Gauthier for class participants. Costs and details for the trip to follow.

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for nonmembers.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

 


 

Pueblo Worlds: An Overview of Pueblo Society and Culture

Course Description:

John Ware

John Ware
© School for Advanced Research

When sixteenth-century Spanish explorers first set foot in what is now the southwestern U.S. they encountered people who lived in multistoried apartment buildings of stone and adobe enclosing communal plazas. The Spanish referred to these people as Pueblos (Spanish for towns), presumably to distinguish them from the residentially-mobile band and tribal groups of the greater Southwest. Despite similarities in architecture and settlement pattern, the people the Spanish called Pueblos speak six mutually unintelligible languages from four different language families, so they are not a monolithic culture but several different peoples who share cultural practices. The Pueblos have also shared more than a century of scrutiny by anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians attempting to sort out their convergent histories. It is likely that no other indigenous cultures in the world have been studied more intensively than the Pueblo people of the Southwest. Pueblo Worlds is a School for Advanced Research mini-course that will explore the many worlds of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Arizona.

Course Leader:
John Ware is an anthropologist and archaeologist whose teaching and research concerns focus on the indigenous cultures of the northern Southwest, where he has worked for almost 50 years. From 2001 until his retirement in 2014, Dr. Ware served as executive director of the Amerind Foundation in southern Arizona. Before that he directed the Laboratory of Anthropology and was founding director of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe. He is the author, most recently, of A Pueblo Social History: Kinship, Sodality, and Community in the Northern Southwest (SAR Press, 2014).

Dates, Times, and Places:
Tuesday, April 24, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, May 8, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, May 15, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday May 22, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non members.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

Fall 2017

Paul Ryer, Director of Scholar Programs

Photo courtesy of Paul Ryer.

Inside The Revolution: An Anthropological Approach to Contemporary Cuba

Course Leader: Paul Ryer, SAR Director of Scholar Programs
This course will investigate the nature of social life in Cuba today, within the historical and ethnographic context of a still-socialist revolutionary state in the Caribbean. After a brief historical overview of Cuban society before 1959, we will consider the formal and informal socialist economy established during the Soviet era; gender relations, racial identities, and migration; arts, material culture, religion, and politics within one of the more distinctive republics in the Americas today.

Combining lectures and discussion of related readings, the class is intended as a brief stand-alone introduction, but also to prepare participants for the subsequent SAR trip to Cuba, November 1-8, 2017. Both the class and the trip will be led by Dr. Paul Ryer, SAR director of scholar programs. Ryer was affiliated with the University of Havana and has conducted long-term research on Cuba and its diasporas.

All sessions meet from 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. in SAR’s Dobkin boardroom, 660 Garcia Street, Santa Fe, NM

Week One: Tuesday, Oct. 3
From Colony to Revolution

Week Two: Tuesday, Oct. 10
State Socialism

Week Three: Tuesday, Oct. 17
Daily Life in the Post-Soviet Era

Week Four: Tuesday, Oct. 24
Arts, Material Culture, Religion, and Politics Today

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

Spring 2017

David E. Stuart

Photo by Jason Ordaz.

From Casual Farmers to Chaco Canyon: Archaeology and the Dynamics of Prehistoric Four Corners Society

Course Leader: David Stuart
How did a few scattered families of part-time horticulturalists in about 1500 B.C. make modest decisions that would transform their descendants into the full-time farmers of the 900s A.D. who supported and shaped the rise of Chacoan Great House Society in the late 1000s A.D.? The answers involve ecology, climate, reproductive and social behaviors, massive amounts of labor, a penchant for problem-solving, and lots of innovation.

David Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are Prehistoric New Mexico, Anasazi America, The Guaymas Chronicles, and the recently released Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau. He earned his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs. Dr. Stuart served as acting president of SAR and has been a lecturer at SAR and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City, and at the Sorbonne in Paris.

Dates & Times
Tuesday, April 25, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 2, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 9, 3-5 p.m.
Tuesday, May 16, 3-5 p.m.