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The Anasazi in a Changing Environment

1988. Edited by George J. Gumerman

The book outlines a thousand-year chronicle of environmental and cultural history that provides an experimental baseline for explaining broad patterns of interaction between humans and their environment. It sets a new standard in archaeological research, and at the same time links the ancient past with the modern world around us in thought-provoking fashion.

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The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon

2006. Edited by Stephen H. Lekson

Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. Two decades after the latest and largest program of field research at Chaco (the National Park Service’s Chaco Project from 1971 to 1982) the original researchers and other leading Chaco scholars convened to evaluate what they now know about Chaco in light of new theories and new data.

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An Archaeology of Doings

2013. Severin M. Fowles

In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos — prior to missionization — did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as “doings.”

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The Archaeology of Lower Central America

1984. Edited by Fredrick W. Lange and Doris Z. Stone

This book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development.

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The Architecture of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1993. Winifred Creamer

From 1971 to 1974, the School of American Research conducted a major multidisciplinary program of excavation and research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth-century Rio Grande sites. At its peak, Arroyo Hondo contained about one thousand rooms. This seventh volume in the series is focused on the walls, roomblocks, and architecture of public spaces at the site.

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The Arroyo Hondo New Mexico Site Survey

1979. D. Bruce Dickson Jr.

This second volume in the Arroyo Hondo series provides the results of the archaeological survey of this large prehistoric pueblo located just southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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The Bright Angel Site

1979. Douglas W. Schwartz, Michael P. Marshall, and Jane Kepp

Timeless Classics includes revived titles long out-of-print and brought to you via a print-on-demand publishing program. These titles have not been modified from the original and are now presented in paperback.

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Chaco & Hohokam

1991. Edited by Patricia L. Crown and W. James Judge

Synthesizing data and current thought about the regional systems of the Chacoans and the Hohokam, eleven archaeologists examine settlement patterns, subsistence economy, social organization, and trade, shedding new light on two of the most sophisticated cultures of the prehistoric Southwest.

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The Chaco Experience

2008. Ruth Van Dyke

The Chacoan landscape, with its formally constructed, carefully situated architectural features, is charged with symbolism. In this volume, Ruth Van Dyke analyzes the meanings and experience of moving through this landscape to illuminate Chacoan beliefs and social relationships.

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Chan Chan

1982. Edited by Michael E. Moseley and Kent C. Day

The fourteen essays in this book focus on the Chan Chan-Moche Valley Project and analyze its five-year archaeological study. It includes chapters on irrigation, excavation results, and sociopolitical organization during the Early Intermediate Period in Peru.

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The Classic Maya Collapse

1973. Edited by T. Patrick Culbert

In this book, thirteen leading scholars use new data to revise the image of ancient Maya civilization and create a new model of its collapse—a general model of sociopolitical collapse not limited to the cultural history of the Maya alone.

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Copán

2005. Edited by E. Wyllys Andrews and William L. Fash

This volume collects leading scholarship on one of the most important archaeological complexes in the ancient Maya world.

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Cowboys & Cave Dwellers

1997. Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson

In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation’s priceless archaeological heritage.

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Enduring Conquests

2011. Edited by Matthew Liebmann and Melissa S. Murphy

The contributors to this volume reject the grand narrative that views this era as a clash of civilizations—a narrative produced centuries after the fact—to construct more comprehensive and complex social histories of Native American life after 1492 by employing the perspective of archaeology and focusing explicitly on the native side of the colonial equation.

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The Faunal Remains from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1984. Richard W. Lang and Arthur H. Harris

This fifth volume presents the results of faunal analysis from the Arroyo Hondo excavations, covering the topics of prehistoric vegetation and climate; the importance of various animals in the diet; seasonal hunting patterns; methods of butchering, skinning, and cooking; the prehistoric hunting territory; the raising of domesticated dogs and turkeys; and trade in animals and animal products.

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The Great Basin

2008. Edited by Catherine S. Fowler and Don D. Fowler

This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment.

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Great Excavations

1995. Melinda Elliott

In Great Excavations, journalist and researcher Melinda Elliott uncovers the crucial and exciting role played by the great archaeologists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in unearthing the Southwest’s prehistoric past.

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Hisat’sinom

2012. Edited by Christian E. Downum

In this book, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.

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A History of the Ancient Southwest

2009. Stephen H. Lekson

While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures.

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The Hohokam Millennium

2008. Edited by Suzanne K. Fish and Paul R. Fish

Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more.

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Ideology and Pre-Columbian Civilizations

1992. Edited by Arthur A. Demarest and Geoffrey W. Conrad

Employing data from central Mexico, the Maya area, coastal Peru, and highland Peru and Bolivia, directors of several major archaeological field projects interpret evidence of prehistoric ideology and address the question, has ideology any relevance in the reconstruction of prehistory?

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In Search of Chaco

2004. Edited by David Grant Noble

This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers.

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Late Lowland Maya Civilization

1986. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and E. Wyllys Andrews V

In light of new and expanding research, the contributors to this volume premise that the relationship of Classic to Postclassic in the Northern and Southern Maya Lowlands is much more complex than was traditionally thought. The essays offer a useful introduction to current thought regarding the development of Lowland Maya civilization after the collapse of the Classic Period in the South.

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Linking the Histories of Slavery

2015. Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

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Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns

1981. Edited by Wendy Ashmore

This book is a series of essays that offers a framework for the study of lowland Maya settlement patterns, surveying the range of interpretive ideas about ancient Maya remains. Suggesting hypotheses to guide future research, the articles discuss historical, geographical, chronological, and theoretical matters.

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Medieval Mississippians

2015. Edited by Timothy R. Pauketat and Susan M. Alt

The eighth volume in the award-winning Popular Archaeology Series, introduces a key historical period in pre-Columbian eastern North America — the “Mississippian” era — via a series of colorful chapters on places, practices, and peoples written from Native American and non-Native perspectives on the past.

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The Mesa Verde World

2006. Edited by David Grant Noble

This book showcases new findings about the region’s prehistory, environment, and archaeological history, from newly discovered reservoir systems on Mesa Verde to astronomical alignments at Yellow Jacket Pueblo.

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Mimbres Lives and Landscapes

2010. Edited by Margaret C. Nelson and Michelle Hegmon

Beginning with an overview of the abrupt change in lifestyle that launched the distinctive Mimbres culture, the book explores the lives of men and women, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of their dramatic pottery designs.

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Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition

2005. J. J. Brody

In this revised edition, noted Mimbres scholar Dr. J. J. Brody incorporates the extensive fieldwork done since the original publication in 1977, updating his discussion of village life, the larger world in which the Mimbres people lived, and how the art that they practiced illuminates these wider issues.

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Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875

2010. David M. Brugge

Combining archaeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest – the Catholic Church – to shed light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation.

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On the Edge of Splendor

1989. Douglas W. Schwartz

Written for a general audience, this book alternates between insightful accounts of Schwartz’s personal experiences in the canyon and explorations of the lives and cultures of its early and late inhabitants.

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The Origins of Maya Civilization

1977. Edited by Richard E. W. Adams

The contributors to this book scrutinize the data, survey external influences on the early Maya, and consider economics, ecology, demography, and warfare – as well as social and ideological factors – in explaining the transformation of Maya culture from a village-oriented society to one centered on elite classes living in large civic centers with monumental architecture.

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Pueblo Population and Society

1983. Ann M. Palkovich

Excavation at Arroyo Hondo yielded 120 human skeletons, many accompanied by grave goods. Palkovich examines skeletal pathologies in relation to age distribution, offering insights into the demographic impact of malnutrition.

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The Peopling of Bandelier

2005. Edited by Robert P. Powers

In this beautifully illustrated book, archaeologists, historians, ecologists, and Pueblo contributors tell a deep and sweeping story of the region.

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The Pottery from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

1993. Judith A. Habicht-Mauche

In this eighth volume of the Arroyo Hondo Archaeological Series, Judith A. Habicht-Mauche builds on an exhaustive study of the mineralogical and chemical attributes of the ceramic assemblage to produce a penetrating evaluation of the stylistic diversity, origins, and changes through time of the pottery types found at Arroyo Hondo.

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Regional Perspectives on the Olmec

1989. Edited by Robert J. Sharer and David C. Grove

This volume brings together ten archaeologists working on the period offering new interpretations and regional syntheses and re-evaluating the role of the Olmec in the crucial developments of the Formative.

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A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico

2005. Jason S. Shapiro

Following the premise that built space embodies social organization, Jason Shapiro takes a fresh look at architectural data from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, a fourteenth-century site in the northern Rio Grande Valley of presentday New Mexico. Using the theoretical assumptions and mathematical techniques of space syntax analysis, he explores what changes in architecture reveal about people’s social lives.

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Themes in Southwest Prehistory

1994. Edited by George J. Gumerman

Two dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population.

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Things in Motion

2015. Edited by Rosemary A. Joyce and Susan D. Gillespie

Complementing the concept of object biography, the contributors to this volume use the complex construct of “itineraries” to trace the places in which objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate, and the means by which they are moved.

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Tikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, & Affairs of State

2003. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff

New insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal’s rulers.

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Unkar Delta

1980. Douglas W. Schwartz, Richard C. Chapman, and Jane Kepp

This book is the first volume in SAR’s Archaeology of the Grand Canyon series. It provides information on the archaeological excavation conducted at the site during the late 1960s.

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The Valley of Mexico

1976. Edited by Eric R. Wolf

The chapters in this volume present an important contemporary interpretation of the cultural and archaeological legacy of the Valley of Mexico, a rich and ancient place where the presence of the past is all around.

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The Walhalla Plateau

1979. Douglas W. Schwartz, Jane Kepp, and Richard C. Chapman

This book presents data from the School of American Research’s survey and excavation on the Walhalla Plateau, discussing the dynamics of settlement expansion and decline and the economic adaptation to this marginal, high-altitude environment.

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Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest

2001. Edited by Patricia L. Crown

This volume takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige. The authors’ probe the time period during which Southwestern populations shifted from migratory gatherer-hunters to sedentary agriculturalists and from living in small bands to settling in large aggregated communities.

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