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Voices from SAR: A Blog

Handmade Almost Perfectly: IARC Native Artist Fellow Jordan Craig

How does a self-proclaimed perfectionist navigate the often messy process of making art? Northern Cheyenne printmaker and painter Jordan Craig tells us that even when the creative journey is difficult, a work’s flaws may become integral to the artist’s achievements. Explore her artistic perspective and learn about the work she produced as SAR’s 2018 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.

SAR Adventures in Archaeology: An International Journey to Brazil

Guest contributor and SAR board member Diane Stanley Vennema shares her reflections on a recent SAR international field trip to Brazil led by archaeologist Anna Roosevelt and SAR president Michael F. Brown. As Brown notes, “When SAR organizes field trips, we recruit experts who can lead our members beneath the surface and deep into the places we visit to reach a more profound understanding of local history and culture. Many of these experts are SAR alumni, former scholars whose work has benefited from their time on our campus. Anna Curtenius Roosevelt is one such scholar.”

SAR Curated. The Swimming Pool of 1926

SAR Curated is a series on the SAR blog exploring the collections, archives, campus, and institutional history. In this edition, the SAR Press acquisitions editor describes Santa Fe’s first swimming pool, which was part of SAR’s historic campus.

SAR Curated. The Martha White Sculpture of 1903

SAR Curated is a series on the SAR blog exploring the collections, archives, campus, and institutional history. In this edition, the SAR Press acquisitions editor highlights the bust of Martha White that can be seen on SAR’s historic campus.

Death Came Knocking on the Seminar House Door and SAR Answered

Exploring the world of death and mourning has always been part of anthropological work, but the opportunity to examine these topics in an interdisciplinary setting is rare in academia. This fall, SAR hosted an Advanced Seminar that enabled a cross-disciplinary dialogue among ten scholars who are currently studying death practices and their cultural relevance.

Brian Vallo and Gaylord Torrence Tour Art of Native America

Nearly two months after the much anticipated opening of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Art of Native America, the Charles and Valerie Diker Collection, the exhibit continues to welcome new visitors and receive national and international media attention. The first exhibit of Native American works in the museum’s American Wing is pushing the dialog around collecting institutions and cultural heritage into new areas of inquiry. IARC director Brian Vallo and curator Gaylord Torrence share reflections on several works in the exhibit in this video tour.

SAR at AAA: Hundreds of SAR Alumni Among 6,000 Anthropologists

Earlier this month, the American Anthropological Association hosted the 117th annual meeting in San Jose, California. For many, the gathering is a five-day whirlwind of presentations, panels, committee meetings, awards, and social gatherings. Among the 6,000 anthropologists and related professionals in attendance, there were hundreds of SAR alumni.

The Preciousness Is the Making: IARC Native Artist Fellow Maile Andrade

With both Native Hawaiian and Chinese ancestry, Maile Andrade comes from a family of people who used their hands: her mother was a painter and a composer, her father a boat builder. “I think being an artist is something that is a gift,” she says. Explore her artistic perspective and hear about the work she produced as SAR’s 2012 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.

Gwinnett County, Georgia: a Microcosm of a National Conversation. SAR Resident Scholar on Immigration, Urban Planning, and Politics

For SAR’s 2018-2019 Mellon Fellow John Arroyo, the hotly contested gubernatorial race in Georgia is more than just a news story passing through his feed. Since July 2016, Arroyo, the MIT-trained urban planner, has been visiting Gwinnett County, Georgia, and researching Mexican immigrant experiences in the region. Arroyo’s timely ethnographic research illustrates the importance of new perspectives based on interdisciplinary research that bridges urban planning with migration studies, Latinx studies, and urban sociology.

SAR Curated. The Gustave Baumann Map of 1927

SAR Curated is a series on the SAR blog exploring the collections, archives, campus, and institutional history. In this edition, the SAR Press acquisition editor highlights a map of the historic campus created by artist Gustave Baumann in the 1920s for the original owners, Elizabeth and Martha White. The map now hangs in SAR’s administration building and visitors can see the piece on campus tours. Schedule a tour by calling 505.954.7200.

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