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Art in Our Lives

2010. Edited by Cynthia Chavez Lamar and Sherry Farrell Racette with Lara Evans

Art in Our Lives grew out of the conversations of a group of Native women artists who spoke frankly about the roles, responsibilities, and commitments in their lives while balancing this existence with their art practice.

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At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds

2003. Gloria J. Emerson; Forward by N. Scott Momaday

These poems, paintings, and personal reflections draw upon an ancient culture while crafting new visual and poetic “legends” to enrich our understanding of the significant places and stories that mark the traditional lands of the Navajo people.

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Becoming Indian

2011. Circe Sturm

Becoming Indian explores the social and cultural values that lie behind this phenomenon and delves into the motivations of these Americans—from so many different walks of life—to reinscribe their autobiographies and find deep personal and collective meaning in reclaiming their Indianness.

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Beyond Red Power

2007. Edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler

How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? Within this one story of indigenous persistence are many stories of local, regional, national, and international activism that require a nuanced understanding of what it means to be an activist or to act in politically purposeful ways.

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Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians

2004. Jill D. Sweet

This expanded edition features the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community.

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Fixing the Books

2015. Erin Debenport

This ethnographic study of emergent literacy provides a complex picture of secrecy, intellectual property, and the formation of publics through its examination of the relationships between prevailing linguistic ideologies, intertextual connections, and the contexts surrounding the production of indigenous language texts.

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For Indigenous Eyes Only

2005. Edited by Waziyatawin Angela Wilson and Michael Yellow Bird

This handbook covers a wide range of topics, including Indigenous governance, education, language, oral tradition, repatriation, images and stereotypes, and truth-telling. It aims to facilitate critical thinking while offering recommendations for fostering community discussions and plans for meaningful community action.

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For Indigenous Minds Only

2012. Edited by Waziyatawin and Michael Yellow Bird

Included in this book are discussions of global collapse, what to consider in returning to a land-based existence, demilitarization for imperial purposes and re-militarization for Indigenous purposes, survival strategies for tribal prisoners, moving beyond the nation-state model, a land-based educational model, personal decolonization, decolonization strategies for youth in custody, and decolonizing gender roles.

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A History of the Navajos

1999. Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey

While many Native Americans have subordinated their tribal identity to their identity as Indians, unique historical circumstances have allowed the Navajos to maintain their uniqueness. This book examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation.

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Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage

2011. Joyce M. Szabo

Joyce Szabo’s examination of the two drawing books by Zotom and Howling Wolf encompasses their origins and the issues surrounding their commission as well as what the images say about their creators and their collector. Szabo augments the complete reproduction of each page with detail photographs of the drawings.

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Indians & Energy

2010. Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner

This book explores the ways people have transformed natural resources in the American Southwest into fuel supplies for human consumption. Not only do Native Americans possess a large percentage of the Southwest’s total acreage, but much of the nation’s coal, oil, and uranium resources reside on tribal lands.

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Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest

2001. Susan Brown McGreevy; Foreword by Kevin Navasie

Exploring the history and the current renaissance of basket making in the Native American Southwest, this lavishly illustrated volume features the work and words of the contemporary basket makers that participated in a Convocation at the School of American Research.

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Indian Painters of the Southwest

2002. Katherine L. Chase; Foreward by Diane Reyna

The book profiles ten outstanding painters representing seven different Pueblo Indian groups and the Navajo Nation who participated in a convocation at the Indian Arts Research Center at the SAR.

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Indian Policies in the Americas

2014. William Y. Adams

In this volume, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies.

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Indian Subjects

2014. William Y. Adams

While histories of the devastating impact of boarding schools — and Native responses to those schools — have dominated academic and community views of indigenous educational history, the valuable lessons from these boarding school histories in the United States and Canada nonetheless provide a fairly narrow view of indigenous educational experiences. Indian Subjects pushes beyond that history.

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Keystone Nations

2012. Edited by Benedict J. Colombi and James F. Brooks

The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book.

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Linking the Histories of Slavery

2015. Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

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Más Que un Indio (More Than an Indian)

2006. Charles R. Hale

This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects.

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Maya Nationalisms and Postcolonial Challenges in Guatemala

2009. Emilio del Valle Escalante

This book focuses on the emergence and political-cultural implications of Guatemala’s Maya movement. It explores how, since the 1970s, indigenous peoples have been challenging established, hegemonic narratives of modernity, history, nation, and cultural identity as these relate to the indigenous world.

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Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition

2005. J. J. Brody

In this revised edition, noted Mimbres scholar Dr. J. J. Brody incorporates the extensive fieldwork done since the original publication in 1977, updating his discussion of village life, the larger world in which the Mimbres people lived, and how the art that they practiced illuminates these wider issues.

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No Deal!

2012. Edited by Tressa Berman

This book encompasses a diverse group of artists, curators, art historians, and anthropologists from Australia and North America in order to investigate social relations of possession through the artifacts and motifs of Indigenous expressive culture.

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“Our Indian Princess”

2009. Nancy Marie Mithlo

In this pathbreaking study, anthropologist Nancy Marie Mithlo examines the power of stereotypes, the utility of pan-Indianism, the significance of realist ideologies, and the employment of alterity in Native American arts.

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One State, Many Nations

2010. Maximilian Viatori

This volume traces the Zápara nationality’s process of self-organization and emergence within Ecuador’s Indigenous movement from 1998 to 2008, to explore the complex role that multiculturalism has played in local Indigenous politics. The paradoxical treatment of Indigenous identity is the subject of this book.

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Otros Saberes

2014. Edited by Charles R. Hale and Lynn Stephen

The six research projects that form the core of the Otros Saberes initiative bring together a diverse group of Afro-descendant and indigenous collaborations with academics. The focus of each research project is driven by a strategic priority in the life of the community, organization, or social movement concerned.

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Our Lives

2014. Jennifer A. Shannon

It is a narrowly focused account of a particular kind of curatorial practice called “community curating.” It is also an account of many different people struggling to do their best under the weight of a monumental task: to represent all Native peoples of the Americas in the first institution of its kind, a national museum dedicated to the first peoples of the hemisphere.

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A Pueblo Social History

2014. John A. Ware; foreword by Timothy Earle

This volume offers new perspectives on the pithouse to pueblo transition, Chaco phenomenon, evolution of Rio Grande moieties, Western Pueblo lineages and clans, Katsina cult, great kivas, dynamics of village aggregation in the late prehistoric period, and much more.

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Painting the Underworld Sky

2006. Mateo Romero, with a foreword by Suzan Shown Harjo

The fifty paintings reproduced here and the artist’s reflections on his own life and that of his father lead the reader to a profound appreciation of the power of Pueblo song and dance to spark those brief flashes of light and hope in this dark fourth world.

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Pueblo Indian Painting

1997. J. J. Brody

This book places this important but under-appreciated fine art tradition squarely within the contexts of Pueblo culture and Euro-American modernism, bringing long-overdue recognition to the tradition and its preeminent practitioners as a vital part of American art history.

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The People

1993. Text and photographs by Stephen Trimble

In this book, Stephen Trimble provides an introduction to these Native peoples that is unrivaled in its scope and readability. Graced with an absorbing, well-researched text, a wealth of maps and historic photographs, and the author’s penetrating contemporary portraits and landscapes, The People is the indispensable reference for anyone interested in the Indians of the Southwest.

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Roosters at Midnight

2010. Robert Albro

Set in the largely urban provincial capital of Quillacollo, this book is an ethnographic examination of municipal politics in the context of renewed elections of local-level officials beginning in 1987 after a hiatus of almost forty years.

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Talking with the Clay, 20th Anniversary Revised Edition

2007. Stephen Trimble

Stephen Trimble’s photographs capture the spirit of Pueblo pottery in its stunning variety, from the glittering micaceous jars of Taos Pueblo to the famous black ware of San Ildefonso Pueblo, from the bold black-on-white designs of Acoma Pueblo to the rich red and gold polychromes of the Hopi villages.

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The Work of Sovereignty

2010. David Kamper

This volume explores the political, economic, and cultural forces that structure and influence indigenous economic development, giving special attention to the perspectives and priorities of the indigenous working people who build tribal futures with their everyday labor.

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