Select Page

Anthropology of Race

2013. Edited by John Hartigan

Anthropology of Race confronts the challenge of formulating an effective rejoinder to new arguments and new data about race, and attempts to address the intense desire to understand race and why it matters.

read more

Biology, Brains, & Behavior

2000. Edited by Sue Taylor Parker, Jonas Langer, and Michael L. McKinney

An exciting new cross-disciplinary field of biocultural research is emerging at the start of the twenty-first century: developmental evolutionary biology. Looking at the behavioral ontogeny of primates, the authors-leading scholars of biological anthropology, evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, and cognitive neuroscience-pose questions that probe our fundamental understanding of the human species.

read more

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death

2012. Edited by Aubrey Baadsgaard, Alexis T. Boutin, and Jane E. Buikstra

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains. These new trajectories challenge old stereotypes, redefine the way research of human remains should be accomplished, and erase the divide that once separated osteologists from archaeologists.

read more

Childhood

2016. Edited by Courtney L. Meehan and Alyssa N. Crittenden

This collection is the first to specifically address our current understanding of the evolution of human childhood, which in turn significantly affects our interpretations of the evolution of family formation, social organization, cultural transmission, cognition, ontogeny, and the physical and socioemotional needs of children.

read more

Costly and Cute

2016. Edited by Wenda R. Trevathan and Karen R. Rosenberg
The authors take a broad look at how human infants are similar to and different from the infants of other species, at how our babies have constrained our evolution over the past six million years, and at how they continue to shape the ways we live today.

read more

The Evolution of Human Life History

2006. Edited by Kristen Hawkes and Richard R. Paine

This volume brings together specialists in hunter-gatherer behavioral ecology and demography, human growth, development, and nutrition, paleodemography, human paleontology, primatology, and the genomics of aging. The contributors identify and explain the peculiar features of human life histories, such as the rate and timing of processes that directly influence survival and reproduction.

read more

The Information Continuum

1994. Barbara J. King

This volume creates a synthetic view of the evolution of communication among primates. King contends that the crucial element in the evolution of information acquisition and transfer is the acquired ability to donate information to others.

read more

Methods and Theories of Anthropological Genetics

1973. Edited by M. H. Crawford and P. L. Workman

This book deals with the methods and theories used to study variation within and among human populations, specifically looking at genetics research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. It presents empirical support for many modern theories in population genetics and demography.

read more

Why Forage?

2016. Edited by Brian F. Codding and Karen L. Kramer

Through a series of detailed case studies, the contributors to this volume examine the decisions made by modern-day foragers to sustain a predominantly hunting and gathering way of life.

read more