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The Ancient City

2008. Edited by Joyce Marcus and Jeremy A. Sabloff

The essays in this volume — presented at a Sackler colloquium of the National Academy of Sciences — reveal that archaeologists now know much more about the founding and functions of ancient cities, their diverse trade networks, their heterogeneous plans and layouts, and their various lifespans and trajectories.

Ancient Civilization and Trade

1975. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography. They examine such topics as central-place theory, information flow, early state modules, long-distance trade, classes of trade, and modes of exchange.

Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management

2010. Edited by Lynne Sebastian and William D. Lipe

By most estimates, as much as 90 percent of the archaeology done in the United States today is carried out in the field of cultural resource management (CRM). The contributors hope that this book will serve as an impetus in American archaeology for dialogue and debate on how to make CRM projects and programs yield both better archaeology and better public policy.

The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon

2006. Edited by Stephen H. Lekson

Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. Two decades after the latest and largest program of field research at Chaco (the National Park Service’s Chaco Project from 1971 to 1982) the original researchers and other leading Chaco scholars convened to evaluate what they now know about Chaco in light of new theories and new data.

The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters

2005. Edited by Gil J. Stein

In this volume, ten archaeologists analyze the assumptions that have constrained previous studies of colonialism and demonstrate that colonization was common in early Old and New World state societies—an important strategy by which people gained access to critical resources.

An Archaeology of Doings

2013. Severin M. Fowles

In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos — prior to missionization — did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as “doings.”

The Archaeology of Lower Central America

1984. Edited by Fredrick W. Lange and Doris Z. Stone

This book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development.

Archaic State Interaction

2010. Edited by William A. Parkinson and Michael L. Galaty

In current archaeological research the failure to find common ground between world-systems theory believers and their counterparts has resulted in a stagnation of theoretical development in regards to modeling how early state societies interacted with their neighbors. This book is an attempt to redress these issues.

Archaic States

1998. Edited by Gary M. Feinman and Joyce Marcus

One of the most challenging problems facing contemporary archaeology concerns the operation and diversity of ancient states. This volume addresses how ancient states were structured and how they operated, an understanding of which is key to our ability to interpret a state’s rise or fall.

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