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Afro-Atlantic Dialogues

2006. Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington

This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology.

American Arrivals

2003. Edited by Nancy Foner

Addressing issues of health care, education, and cultural values and practices among Mexicans, Haitians, Somalis, Afghans, and other newcomers to the United States, the authors illuminate the complex ways that immigrants adapt to life in a new land and raise serious questions about the meaning and political uses of ideas about cultural difference.

Ancient Civilization and Trade

1975. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography. They examine such topics as central-place theory, information flow, early state modules, long-distance trade, classes of trade, and modes of exchange.

Anthropology in the Margins of the State

2004. Edited by Veena Das and Deborah Poole

Drawing on fieldwork in Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Peru, Guatemala, India, Chad, Colombia, and South Africa, the contributors examine official documentary practices and their forms and falsifications; the problems that highly mobile mercenaries, currency, goods, arms, and diamonds pose to the state; emerging non-state regulatory authorities; and the role language plays as cultures struggle to articulate their situation.

Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management

2010. Edited by Lynne Sebastian and William D. Lipe

By most estimates, as much as 90 percent of the archaeology done in the United States today is carried out in the field of cultural resource management (CRM). The contributors hope that this book will serve as an impetus in American archaeology for dialogue and debate on how to make CRM projects and programs yield both better archaeology and better public policy.

The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon

2006. Edited by Stephen H. Lekson

Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. Two decades after the latest and largest program of field research at Chaco (the National Park Service’s Chaco Project from 1971 to 1982) the original researchers and other leading Chaco scholars convened to evaluate what they now know about Chaco in light of new theories and new data.

The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters

2005. Edited by Gil J. Stein

In this volume, ten archaeologists analyze the assumptions that have constrained previous studies of colonialism and demonstrate that colonization was common in early Old and New World state societies—an important strategy by which people gained access to critical resources.

The Archaeology of Lower Central America

1984. Edited by Fredrick W. Lange and Doris Z. Stone

This book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development.

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