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Afro-Atlantic Dialogues

2006. Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington

This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology.

Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan

2018. Edited by Paul F. Reed and Gary M. Brown

Often overshadowed by the Ancestral Pueblo centers at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, the Middle San Juan is one of the most dynamic territories in the pre-Hispanic Southwest, interacting with Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde as well as the surrounding regions.

Chiefdoms

1991. Edited by Timothy Earle

The study of chiefdoms has moved from preoccupation with their formal characteristics to a concern with their dynamics as political institutions. The contributors to this volume are interested in how ruling elites retain power through control over production and exchange, and then legitimize that control through an elaborate ideology.

Childhood

2016. Edited by Courtney L. Meehan and Alyssa N. Crittenden

This collection is the first to specifically address our current understanding of the evolution of human childhood, which in turn significantly affects our interpretations of the evolution of family formation, social organization, cultural transmission, cognition, ontogeny, and the physical and socioemotional needs of children.

Classic Maya Political History

1991. Edited by T. Patrick Culbert

This volume is the first to present in detail the results of decipherment and to consider the implications of a Classic Maya written history. Contributors examine the way in which the Maya elite created the kinship, alliance, warfare, and ceremonial networks on which the civilization was founded.

Critical Anthropology Now

1999. Edited by George E. Marcus

Building on the legacy of Writing Culture, Critical Anthropology Now vividly represents the changing nature of anthropological research practice, demonstrating how new and more complicated locations of research – from the boardrooms of multinational corporations to the chat rooms of the Internet – are giving rise to shifts in the character of fieldwork and fieldworker.

Disturbing Bodies

2015. Edited by Zoë Crossland and Rosemary A. Joyce
As bodies are revealed, so are hidden and often incommensurate understandings of the body after death. The theme of “disturbing bodies” has a double valence, evoking both the work that anthropologists do and also the ways in which the dead can, in turn, disturb the living through their material qualities, through dreams and other forms of presence, and through the political claims often articulated around them.

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