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Aboriginal Business

2009. Kimberly Christen

From the vantage point of the remote Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek in Australia, this book examines the practical partnerships and awkward alliances that constitute Indigenous modernities. It is an ethnographic snapshot of the Warumungu people as they engage with a range of interlocutors, including transnational railroad companies, national mining groups, international tourists, and regional businesses.

Acequia

2006. Silvia Rodriguez

Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. The acequia or irrigation ditch associations of Taos, Río Arriba, Mora, and other northern New Mexico counties offer an alternative.

Afro-Atlantic Dialogues

2006. Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington

This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology.

All That Glitters

1999. Duane Anderson; Foreword by Lonnie Vigil

All That Glitters, the first comprehensive study of the micaceous pottery tradition in New Mexico, explores the current transition of micaceous pottery from a traditional culinary ware to an exciting contemporary art form. The illustrated catalog of the micaceous pottery collection at SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center and a roster of micaceous potters practicing in northern New Mexico today further details the art form.

Ambos Nogales

2002. Photographs by Maeve Hickey; Text by Lawrence Taylor

Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales.

American Arrivals

2003. Edited by Nancy Foner

Addressing issues of health care, education, and cultural values and practices among Mexicans, Haitians, Somalis, Afghans, and other newcomers to the United States, the authors illuminate the complex ways that immigrants adapt to life in a new land and raise serious questions about the meaning and political uses of ideas about cultural difference.

The Anasazi in a Changing Environment

1988. Edited by George J. Gumerman

The book outlines a thousand-year chronicle of environmental and cultural history that provides an experimental baseline for explaining broad patterns of interaction between humans and their environment. It sets a new standard in archaeological research, and at the same time links the ancient past with the modern world around us in thought-provoking fashion.

The Ancient City

2008. Edited by Joyce Marcus and Jeremy A. Sabloff

The essays in this volume — presented at a Sackler colloquium of the National Academy of Sciences — reveal that archaeologists now know much more about the founding and functions of ancient cities, their diverse trade networks, their heterogeneous plans and layouts, and their various lifespans and trajectories.

Ancient Civilization and Trade

1975. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography. They examine such topics as central-place theory, information flow, early state modules, long-distance trade, classes of trade, and modes of exchange.

Anthropology in the Margins of the State

2004. Edited by Veena Das and Deborah Poole

Drawing on fieldwork in Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Peru, Guatemala, India, Chad, Colombia, and South Africa, the contributors examine official documentary practices and their forms and falsifications; the problems that highly mobile mercenaries, currency, goods, arms, and diamonds pose to the state; emerging non-state regulatory authorities; and the role language plays as cultures struggle to articulate their situation.

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