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How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to John Arroyo

How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to John Arroyo

SAR Press is starting a new blog series comprised of interviews with diverse scholars who have recently published or are in the midst of publishing their first book and who can offer guidance and encouragement to colleagues who are just starting to think about publishing. We hope that these interviews make a small contribution to supporting junior scholars as they begin the publishing process.

SAR Press Top Reads: Indigenous Identity

SAR Press Top Reads: Indigenous Identity

The books in this list address Indigenous identity from different perspectives and in different ways: Native artists discuss the tensions between art and life; Native anthropologists and historians describe changing forms of identity via stereotyping, genetic science, ecology, and decolonization; and Native writers in various genres tell the stories of their people surviving and thriving, past and present.

The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo Collection Finds a New Home

The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo Collection Finds a New Home

In 1970 former SAR president Douglas Schwartz began test excavations at the fourteenth-century Pueblo site of Arroyo Hondo, located approximately five miles south of Santa Fe. Earlier this year, SAR made the decision to transfer its only archaeological collection to the Center for New Mexico Archaeology, the state repository for such collections, where it will be able to receive more specialized care.

The Equitable Transformation of Communities: A Conversation with John Arroyo

The Equitable Transformation of Communities: A Conversation with John Arroyo

John Arroyo, SAR’s 2018–2019 Mellon fellow, grew up in a largely Mexican and Mexican American community in East LA. Even as a kid, he was thinking about urban issues and the diversity and future of communities like his. He is now a planner who incorporates a humanistic perspective into his work, which allows him to make connections between urban issues, art, and the social sciences.

Summer Scholar Colloquium: Nicholas Barron Brings the History of Anthropology into the Present

Summer Scholar Colloquium: Nicholas Barron Brings the History of Anthropology into the Present

In November 1981, anthropologists and tribal representatives gathered on the Pascua Pueblo Yaqui Reservation in southern Arizona for the 89th International Symposium, hosted by the Wenner-Gren Foundation. Although this obscure conference may have been relegated to a footnote in the history of anthropology and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Nicholas Barron, SAR’s 2020 William Y. and Nettie K. Adams summer scholar, argues that its story helps us to better understand consequential, ongoing political processes and Indigenous histories.

Venancio Aragon: Weaving the Colors of the World

Venancio Aragon: Weaving the Colors of the World

Venancio Aragon is the SAR 2020 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native artist fellow. If you ever meet Venancio, you will notice his friendly demeanor and willingness to chat. He is a citizen of the Navajo Nation and what I would consider an award-winning master weaver, although he describes himself as “a humble practitioner of an ancient art.” Along with being an artist, he is also an intellectual, knowledge holder, and student.

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