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White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

“Aging in place” is a common phrase meaning that older people prefer to age (most frequently through the end of their lives) in their homes, in spaces that represent their lives, and ideally close to family and friends. This white paper is the result of a salon held at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) that took place on June 6, 2019, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which was generously sponsored by the Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation.

Elysia Poon named Indian Arts Research Center Director

Elysia Poon named Indian Arts Research Center Director

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to announce the appointment of Elysia Poon as the new director of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC). With over a decade of experience within the organization as the IARC curator of education and nearly twenty years of museum experience, Poon has demonstrated a commitment to collaborative programming and a dedication to community-based collections care. Under her leadership, the IARC will continue to advance national conversations around how collecting institutions and Native American communities can work together to foster cultural heritage and promote contemporary art practices.

Understanding the U.S. Immigration Detention System – An Anthropologist’s Perspective

Understanding the U.S. Immigration Detention System – An Anthropologist’s Perspective

After Deborah Boehm finished her book Returned: Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation, which she partially wrote as an SAR Research Associate in 2013, she knew she needed to do more. During her research, she had formed deep relationships with immigrant families impacted by deportation. “Many of those I had interviewed had been also been detained, and their stories were so harrowing,” she says. “Their lives had been unraveled by state action.”

Pueblo Activists and Allies against the Bursum Bill of 1921

Pueblo Activists and Allies against the Bursum Bill of 1921

In 1921 New Mexico senator Holm Bursum introduced a bill into Congress that would have allowed non-Native people to claim Pueblo Indian lands if they could prove ten years of residency. The Indigenous governors of the nineteen pueblos worked with John Collier, Indian rights advocate and FDR’s commissioner of Indian affairs, to send representatives to Congress who would voice their opposition to the Bursum Bill of 1921.

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

The School for Advanced Research is pleased to announce the third annual Creative Thought Forum series. Across lectures and conversation-style salons, SAR and community partners invite our members and the public to explore our understanding of where humanity is going in a new age of technological and cultural shifts under the thematic umbrella of “The Future of Work.”

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