facebookpixel
Select Page
Living Nations, Living Words, SAR Welcomes Joy Harjo

Living Nations, Living Words, SAR Welcomes Joy Harjo

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to present a virtual program welcoming U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. Reflecting on the upcoming program with SAR, Harjo shares, “The StoryMap project was a way to widen the doorway that my poet laureateship created when I became the first Native U.S. Poet Laureate. It was important to show that there are many Native poets writing poetry alongside each other, and that we speak from a sense of place in which there are no political boundaries imposed by non-Native cultures and political entities.” 

Looking Forward, Looking Back

Looking Forward, Looking Back

With the nation’s social and political turmoil as well as an ongoing pandemic, 2020 revealed how now more than ever the perspectives of social science scholars and Native American artists matter. In today’s post, we reflect on the last year and invite you to join us for online programs in the new year.

Chaco Landscapes: Sensory and Political Engagements with Place

Chaco Landscapes: Sensory and Political Engagements with Place

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to announce the next event in our third annual Creative Thought Forum Series. Archaeologist Ruth Van Dyke presents Chaco Landscapes: Sensory and Political Engagements with Place. In her talk she shares insights into past and present social, political, and sensorial relationships across the greater Chaco landscape. She explores how archaeologists can work together with Native peoples to influence the public understanding of contemporary economic/extractive projects, including those in northwest New Mexico.

White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

“Aging in place” is a common phrase meaning that older people prefer to age (most frequently through the end of their lives) in their homes, in spaces that represent their lives, and ideally close to family and friends. This white paper is the result of a salon held at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) that took place on June 6, 2019, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which was generously sponsored by the Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation.

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

The School for Advanced Research is pleased to announce the third annual Creative Thought Forum series. Across lectures and conversation-style salons, SAR and community partners invite our members and the public to explore our understanding of where humanity is going in a new age of technological and cultural shifts under the thematic umbrella of “The Future of Work.”

Minds in the Net: The Journey from Page to Screen with Nicholas Carr

Minds in the Net: The Journey from Page to Screen with Nicholas Carr

New York Times best-selling author Nicholas Carr presents “Minds in the Net: The Journey from Page to Screen” as this year’s Creative Thought Forum annual president’s lecture. Carr addresses how digital media shapes our thoughts and perceptions, as well as the ways we communicate. To put this into context, he draws a contrast with the media technology that the computer screen has supplanted: the printed page.

From “Garden Warriors” to “Good Seeds” – Indigenizing the Local Food Movement with anthropologist Elizabeth Hoover

From “Garden Warriors” to “Good Seeds” – Indigenizing the Local Food Movement with anthropologist Elizabeth Hoover

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to host anthropologist Elizabeth Hoover for an exploration of seed sovereignty and how issues like global climate change are influencing farming and food practices in Native American communities. Drawing on extensive visits to thirty-nine Native American food and farming heritage projects—including several in New Mexico—and formal and informal interviews with chefs, farm owners, growers, and community members, Hoover’s current work will serve as one of the first comprehensive multi-site ethnographies of the Native American food sovereignty movement.

Pin It on Pinterest