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SAR Scholar Alberto Wilson Interweaves the Industrial Political Economy and the Fighting Spirit of the Working Class in Ciudad Juárez/El Paso

SAR Scholar Alberto Wilson Interweaves the Industrial Political Economy and the Fighting Spirit of the Working Class in Ciudad Juárez/El Paso

Smack in the middle of the Chihuahuan Desert an urban landscape emerges. The Rio Grande, or Río Bravo to those in Mexico, trickles through, designating their two countries: to the north El Paso, Texas, and to the south, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. They have separate names; however, it is impossible to consider one without the other.

The Year the Stars Fell

The Year the Stars Fell

Philip Deloria, 2023–2024 Katrin H. Lamon Fellow, is writing a new book that looks at American epistemology through shared experiences of the extraordinary Leonid meteor storm of November 1833—which may have generated as many as thirty meteors per second. “This is a perfect moment in America to imagine a continental history of shared experience among many peoples.”  

Tiya Miles and Ned Blackhawk Remember Residencies and Impact on Each Other

Tiya Miles and Ned Blackhawk Remember Residencies and Impact on Each Other

So far, two SAR Resident Scholar Fellows have won the National Book Award: Tiya Miles in 2021 for her book All that She Carried: the Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake and Ned Blackhawk in 2023 for The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History. Recently, they took a moment from their very busy schedules to share a little about their residency experiences at SAR, how they impacted their lives, and also a few words about how they influenced each other.

Weaving Worlds with Words – the Collaborative Life of Dennis and Barbara Tedlock

Weaving Worlds with Words – the Collaborative Life of Dennis and Barbara Tedlock

There’s one couple who essentially “book-end” the scholars in that group from 1973 and to the 2000s: Barbara and Dennis Tedlock. They were poet scholars. Both taught poetry in addition to anthropology. Both wrote their own poetry and participated in literary readings. Their mission was to “expand and alter the ways in which anthropologists conduct and communicate their work,” expressed in just that way in the preface to the first issue of the American Anthropologist, which they edited as a husband and wife team from 1994-1998.

Scholar, Mentor, Trailblazer: Linda Cordell’s Influence on Contemporary Archaeology

Scholar, Mentor, Trailblazer: Linda Cordell’s Influence on Contemporary Archaeology

Women in archaeology have come a long way. They now comprise half of all archaeologists in North America and have surpassed men in the number of archaeology PhDs awarded. They work as the heads of university departments, leaders of field schools, and senior scholars in research institutions. Yet when Linda Cordell (1943–2013) emerged into the field, the landscape was very different.