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SAR Scholar Alumni in the National Press

SAR Scholar Alumni in the National Press

Our scholars use their fellowship year to hone writing skills while finishing their diverse research projects. It is no surprise, then, that after leaving SAR many of our alumni manage to publish books and articles that move past the boundaries of academic writing to catch the attention of a national readership.

Bolo Tie Highlights: An IARC Collection Reflection

Bolo Tie Highlights: An IARC Collection Reflection

Over the course of her Anne Ray internship, Emily Santhanam dove deep into the collections, approaching the objects through registration, collections management, education, and curation work. Each project taught her to navigate Native American arts stewardship in a new way. Yet what she most enjoyed was creating an online exhibition about the bolo ties cared for by the IARC.

Kapa-Making as a Way of Being: A Conversation with Lehuauakea

Kapa-Making as a Way of Being: A Conversation with Lehuauakea

SAR’s 2021 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow, Lehuauakea is a Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) interdisciplinary artist. Originally from Pāpa’ikou on Moku O Keawe, Hawai’i, Lehuauakea creates traditional kapa (wauke bark cloth), which is painted or hand-stamped with patterns made from natural earth pigments and plant dyes.

How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to Robert Caldwell

How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to Robert Caldwell

SAR Press has started a new blog series comprised of interviews with diverse scholars who have recently published or are in the midst of publishing their first book and who can offer guidance and encouragement to colleagues who are just starting to think about publishing. We hope that these interviews make a small contribution to supporting junior scholars as they begin the publishing process.

Archaeology and Place at Chaco Canyon

Archaeology and Place at Chaco Canyon

Archaeologists have been paying attention to place for many years. As they have studied vernacular architecture, among other important markers of the past, they have recognized the importance and meaning given to specific places by peoples around the world. Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico has been one such place for hundreds of years.

SAR Press Top Reads: Place, Environment, and Change

SAR Press Top Reads: Place, Environment, and Change

As we think about our relationships with environment, landscape, and place in the context of drought and urbanization, we must also think about change. The books in this list describe how environmental change affects people with deep roots in New Mexico, Guatemala, Mongolia, and elsewhere around the world.

Rethinking National Parks

Rethinking National Parks

Anthropologist, novelist, and SAR’s Katrin H. Lamon resident scholar of 2015–16, David Treuer (Ojibwe), is garnering national attention for his cover story in the May 2021 issue of the Atlantic Monthly, “Return the National Park to the Tribes.” SAR president, Michael F. Brown, reflects on the article and more.

Spider Woman’s Knowledge and the Survival of Diné Textile Arts

Spider Woman’s Knowledge and the Survival of Diné Textile Arts

In each session of his course on Navajo weaving, artist Venancio Aragon takes his students on a journey that exposes the impact of non-Indigenous institutions on Diné peoples and their making, as well as the sovereignty that Indigenous peoples, including artists, have continued to exercise through each moment.

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