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Redefining Ancient Maya Culture Through the Study of the 99 Percent

Redefining Ancient Maya Culture Through the Study of the 99 Percent

SAR board member and eminent archaeologist, Jerry Sabloff has devoted considerable effort to the study of settlement patterns in Mexico and Central America—the when, where and how non-elite Maya people lived and worked. Sabloff discusses his discoveries in a Q&A interview in the 2019 issue of Knowable Magazine and presents on the topic in this fall’s SAR In-Depth course.

Touring “Down Under” to Talk Hobbits, Einstein, and the Evolution of Language

Touring “Down Under” to Talk Hobbits, Einstein, and the Evolution of Language

At the heart of her research, SAR senior scholar Dean Falk asks, “What can fossils, babies, and Einstein tell us about the way our brains have evolved?” ​Falk addressed this question and more during a tour of lectures and interviews across western Australia this summer, where, on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) Radio program “Late Night Live”, she touches upon evolution and language, the uniqueness of Einstein’s brain, and “hobbits”, or the newly discovered (and short) human species, Homo floresiensis.

A Part of the Flow: IARC Native Artist Fellow Mateo Romero

A Part of the Flow: IARC Native Artist Fellow Mateo Romero

Mateo Romero is interested in motion—bodies and ideas moving through space, history, ceremony, art. Romero describes his work as juxtaposing “timeless, archaic elements of Pueblo culture” with “contemporary abstract expressionist palette knife and brush work.” In 2002 he came to SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) as the Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow.

Sharing Knowledge and Collaborative Curation: Native Women Artists Featured in New MIA Exhibit

Sharing Knowledge and Collaborative Curation: Native Women Artists Featured in New MIA Exhibit

“It may ruffle feathers, but diversity means there’s a different way of doing things. If you want buy-in from the Native communities, you have to listen to them.” —Teri Greeves, SAR’s 2003 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native artist fellow, quoted in a recent New York Times article exploring the current Minneapolis Institute of Art exhibit, Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists.

Unlocking Clues to Life in the Middle San Juan Pueblos

Unlocking Clues to Life in the Middle San Juan Pueblos

Ruined great houses, corn kernels and bones—these are just some of the archeological fragments that have offered researchers new insights into how Middle San Juan Puebloan peoples lived in the 12th and 13th centuries. Featured earlier this year in the Santa Fe New Mexican’s Pasatiempo, the book Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan covers these topics and more as eleven contributing writers examine new evidence that helps shed light on the settlements.

Handmade Almost Perfectly: IARC Native Artist Fellow Jordan Craig

Handmade Almost Perfectly: IARC Native Artist Fellow Jordan Craig

How does a self-proclaimed perfectionist navigate the often messy process of making art? Northern Cheyenne printmaker and painter Jordan Craig tells us that even when the creative journey is difficult, a work’s flaws may become integral to the artist’s achievements. Explore her artistic perspective and learn about the work she produced as SAR’s 2018 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.

Best-Selling Book by SAR Alumnus Challenges Traditional Narratives of Native America and Underscores the Achievements of Indians in Contemporary Culture.

Best-Selling Book by SAR Alumnus Challenges Traditional Narratives of Native America and Underscores the Achievements of Indians in Contemporary Culture.

A new, widely acclaimed book by SAR scholar alumnus David Treuer is challenging long-held views of the state of Native America. The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, argues that Dee Brown’s famous history of Native American dispossession and genocide, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, perpetuates a mistaken impression of the situation of American Indians today.

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