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Handmade Almost Perfectly: IARC Native Artist Fellow Jordan Craig

Handmade Almost Perfectly: IARC Native Artist Fellow Jordan Craig

How does a self-proclaimed perfectionist navigate the often messy process of making art? Northern Cheyenne printmaker and painter Jordan Craig tells us that even when the creative journey is difficult, a work’s flaws may become integral to the artist’s achievements. Explore her artistic perspective and learn about the work she produced as SAR’s 2018 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.

Best-Selling Book by SAR Alumnus Challenges Traditional Narratives of Native America and Underscores the Achievements of Indians in Contemporary Culture.

Best-Selling Book by SAR Alumnus Challenges Traditional Narratives of Native America and Underscores the Achievements of Indians in Contemporary Culture.

A new, widely acclaimed book by SAR scholar alumnus David Treuer is challenging long-held views of the state of Native America. The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, argues that Dee Brown’s famous history of Native American dispossession and genocide, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, perpetuates a mistaken impression of the situation of American Indians today.

Writer Gordon Lee Johnson Blends Modern Life with Cultural Tradition

Writer Gordon Lee Johnson Blends Modern Life with Cultural Tradition

Gordon Lee Johnson writes primarily to tell the stories of today’s California Indian, but he is also interested in addressing the universal human condition. Johnson was SAR’s 2017 Indigenous Writer-in-Residence and was recently featured in a Los Angeles Times article on California Native American artists and the struggle to preserve their culture in the modern world.

SAR at AAA: Hundreds of SAR Alumni Among 6,000 Anthropologists

SAR at AAA: Hundreds of SAR Alumni Among 6,000 Anthropologists

Earlier this month, the American Anthropological Association hosted the 117th annual meeting in San Jose, California. For many, the gathering is a five-day whirlwind of presentations, panels, committee meetings, awards, and social gatherings. Among the 6,000 anthropologists and related professionals in attendance, there were hundreds of SAR alumni.

The Preciousness Is the Making: IARC Native Artist Fellow Maile Andrade

The Preciousness Is the Making: IARC Native Artist Fellow Maile Andrade

With both Native Hawaiian and Chinese ancestry, Maile Andrade comes from a family of people who used their hands: her mother was a painter and a composer, her father a boat builder. “I think being an artist is something that is a gift,” she says. Explore her artistic perspective and hear about the work she produced as SAR’s 2012 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.

Ayahuasca Tourism In Perú: A Tale of Violence and Indigenous Resistance

Ayahuasca Tourism In Perú: A Tale of Violence and Indigenous Resistance

Abou Farman (Anthropology, The New School) was recently at SAR as a participant in the advanced seminar “Death Culture in the 21st Century,” co-chaired by Shannon Lee Dawdy (University of Chicago) and Tamara E. Kneese (U. San Francisco). Knowing about my interest in Amazonia, Abou passed along information on a recent tragedy in Amazonian Peru that took place not far from the major city of Pucallpa.

A Continued Practice: Pueblo Textile Traditions Highlighted in IARC Tour

A Continued Practice: Pueblo Textile Traditions Highlighted in IARC Tour

On a recent Sunday afternoon at the Indian Arts Research Center, Pueblo weavers Aric Chopito (Zuni Pueblo) and Louie Garcia (Prio Manso Tiwa tribe of Guadalupe Pueblo) and embroiderer Isabel Gonzales (Jemez Pueblo) came together with director Brian Vallo for a guided tour of the collections. The tour followed a panel discussion with the participants for SAR members and the public about the history and revitalization of the Pueblo weaving tradition, as well as the physical, financial, and cultural struggles that these artists continue to face.

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