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Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship

One nine-month residential fellowship is available for a Native scholar working in the humanities or the social sciences. Scholars with doctorates who plan to write their books and PhD candidates who plan to write their dissertations are eligible. Fellows receive a stipend ($40,000 for doctoral level scholars and $30,000 for PhD candidates) in addition to housing and office space on the SAR campus. This fellowship is made possible through the generous support of the Katrin H. Lamon Endowment for Native American Art and Education.

Please Note: SAR allows fellows to bring their companion animals to campus but our accommodations are limited to two SMALL animals.  We allow only cats and dogs on the premises.

 


 Lamon Fellows

2019-2020 Dorothy Grant
Project: “A Memoir of Her Life as a World-Renowned Haida Artist”

2018-2019 Melanie Yazzie
Project: “K’e is LIfe: Biopolitical Struggle and Relational Possibility”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Assistant Professor, Depts. of Native American Studies and American Studies, University of New Mexico

2017-2018 Thomas Michael Swensen
Project: “The Great Land: The Environment and Belonging in Native Alaska”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Assistant Professor, Division of Ethnic Studies, University of Utah

2016-2017 Gregorio Gonzales
Project: “Si Eres Genizaro: Race, Indigeneity, and Belonging in Northern New Mexico”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: PhD Candidate, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin

2015-2016 David Treuer
Project: “The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Professor, Dept. of English, University of Southern California

2014-2015 Joseph “Woody” Aguilar
Project: “The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt at Tanyo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: PhD Candidate, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

2013-2014 Kent Blansett
Project: “A Journey to Freedom: The Life of Richard Oakes, 1942 – 1972”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Assistant Professor, Dept. of History and Native American Studies, University of Nebraska – Omaha

2012-2013 Danika Medak-Saltzman
Project: “Specters of Colonialism: Native Peoples, Visual Culture, and Colonial Projects in the U.S. and Japan (1860 – 1904)”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Assistant Professor, Dept. of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado – Boulder

2011-2012 Margaret M. Bruchac
Project: “Consorting with Savages: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Connecticut

2010-2011 Doug Kiel
Project: “The Oneida Resurgence: Modern Indian Renewal in the Heart of America”
Affiliation at time of fellowship: PhD Candidate, Dept. of History, University of Wisconsin – Madison

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