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Ian Kuali’i on Ephemeral Site-Specific Installations and Hand-Cut Paper Works

Ian Kuali’i on Ephemeral Site-Specific Installations and Hand-Cut Paper Works

2019 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow, Ian Kuali’i takes the stage on August 8, 2019, in SAR’s Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom to share about his fellowship experience. Through  hand-cut paper works and ephemeral Land Art/Earth Works installations, Kuali’i bridges contemporary and traditional techniques and designs while addressing themes related to his own history and identity, as well as what he expresses as “intertwined system of bio-cultural landscape and modernization”

A Part of the Flow: IARC Native Artist Fellow Mateo Romero

A Part of the Flow: IARC Native Artist Fellow Mateo Romero

Mateo Romero is interested in motion—bodies and ideas moving through space, history, ceremony, art. Romero describes his work as juxtaposing “timeless, archaic elements of Pueblo culture” with “contemporary abstract expressionist palette knife and brush work.” In 2002 he came to SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) as the Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow.

Guidelines in Action: Chicago’s Field Museum Improves Community Visits

Guidelines in Action: Chicago’s Field Museum Improves Community Visits

See how the internationally-recognized Field Museum is implementing the Guidelines for Collaboration in their work. Guest post by Jamie Kelly, Head of Anthropology Collections & Collections Manager at the Field Museum’s Gantz Family Collections Center and Jamie Lewis, Anthropology Collections Manager at the Field Museum’s Gantz Family Collections Center.

SAR Curated. The Florentine Codex

SAR Curated. The Florentine Codex

To search the archives for information about SAR’s groundbreaking English translation of Bernardino de Sahagún’s Florentine Codex, co-published with University of Utah Press beginning in the 1950s, is to experience time in the form of paper.

Sharing Knowledge and Collaborative Curation: Native Women Artists Featured in New MIA Exhibit

Sharing Knowledge and Collaborative Curation: Native Women Artists Featured in New MIA Exhibit

“It may ruffle feathers, but diversity means there’s a different way of doing things. If you want buy-in from the Native communities, you have to listen to them.” —Teri Greeves, SAR’s 2003 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native artist fellow, quoted in a recent New York Times article exploring the current Minneapolis Institute of Art exhibit, Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists.

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