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Craig R. Janes

Craig R. Janes

Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar

While at SAR, Dr. Janes will be working on a book examining the impact of Mongolia’s socioeconomic and political transition within the context of increasing environmental hazards linked to climate change. Dr. Janes’s book will be grounded in more than a decade of ethnographic research and will employ a narrative structure that moves from local to state levels and from rural to urban locales. The book will also be broadly historical in scope, moving across the 20th and early 21st centuries to describe and analyze patterns of socialist and then post-socialist change.

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Julie M. Weise

Julie M. Weise

Weatherhead Resident Scholar

While at SAR, Dr. Weise will complete work on a book manuscript the goal of which is to enhance our understanding of the human experience on four levels. Empirically, the book employs previously unexamined archives to show that, contrary to scholarly assumptions, Mexican immigration to the U.S. South is not exclusively a late-twentieth century phenomenon. Rather, Mexican immigrant communities have challenged the region’s social, political, and economic structures since the early twentieth century.

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Margaret M. Bruchac

Margaret M. Bruchac

Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar

Bruchac, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Connecticut, poses the question: “What happened when the thought-worlds of collectors and collected intersected?” She has been delving into multiple archives of unpublished correspondence to reconstruct the anthropologists’ discourse with Indigenous gatekeepers—including George Hunt (Tlingit), Gladys Tantaquidgeon (Mohegan), and Jesse Cornplanter (Seneca), among others—who “assisted, resisted, and otherwise complicated processes of ethnographic exchange.”

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Nancy Marie Mithlo

Nancy Marie Mithlo

Anne Ray Resident Scholar

Dr. Mithlo’s research places the photographic legacy of Horace Poolaw within the larger context of American Indian visual representations, particularly in the transitional period (1920–1950) of Indian citizenship, urbanization, and engagement in emerging photographic technologies. Self-representation—including theatrical performances and parades; tribal, pan-tribal, and family occasions such as graduations, weddings, funerals, and vacations; and artistic portraits—serve as the focal point for Dr. Mithlo’s analysis.

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Teresa L. McCarty

Teresa L. McCarty

National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar

Teresa McCarty was surprised by the young people she interviewed toward the end of a multi-year project studying the impact of language shift and retention on Native American students’ school achievement. “Language shift” refers to the process by which intergenerational transmission of a community language breaks down. In this case, most Native youth were learning English, rather than the Indigenous language, as a first language—a shift that is widespread throughout North America.

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Wossen Argaw Tegegn

Wossen Argaw Tegegn

Campbell Resident Scholar

Tegegn is the second recipient of the Vera Campbell Fellowship, a six-month residency available for a female postdoctoral social scientist from a developing nation whose work addresses women’s economic and social empowerment in that nation. One pivotal chapter of her dissertation is a case study of how one university responded to the sexual assault of a woman student by two university workers, revealing the complex interplay of inadequate institutional policies, bureaucratic barriers, cultural taboos, and male domination.

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