Calendar

Lectures, symposiums, artist open houses, colloquiums, field trips, and many other events are regularly sponsored by the School for Advanced Research (SAR). These are available to SAR members, and many also are open to the general public. All upcoming events are listed below.

September 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Living at the Base of an Active Volcano: Search for Serenity Doug Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research A volcano on an isolated island north of Sicily named Stromboli erupts every fifteen minutes or so sending hot ash and flames several feet into the air. About every ten years, it erupts violently with deadly force. How do people cope with living with this danger?
Llama packing to Rainbow Bridge Field Trip
Monday, September 29–Saturday, October 4, 2014, Trip limited to 10 participants Extraordinary Adventure: Navajo Mountain to Rainbow Bridge Trip leader: Kimberly Spurr On the northern edge of the Navajo Nation, Navajo Mountain rises to 10,388 feet. Geologically unique as an isolated laccolithic dome, the mountain towers above 1,500-foot deep canyons and breathtaking contours of Navajo sandstone. This spectacular and remote country on the Utah and Arizona border provides a unique opportunity to explore a rarely visited part of the Colorado Plateau, which contains a wealth of archaeological prehistory and contemporary Navajo cultural history.
October 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 1, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Race, Identity, and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Kelly Fayard, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bowdoin College, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The Poarch Band of Creek Indians, first noted in published records in the 1940s by anthropologist Frank Speck, is located in Alabama, a place where many incorrectly assume that no Native people remain.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Comanche New Mexico: Indigenous Archives Severin Fowles, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR We are accustomed to describing eighteenth century New Mexico as a Spanish colony and reading its history from this perspective.
Make Haste to Live movie poster Sparks
Tuesday, October 14, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Filmed in New Mexico Jeff Berg Since Thomas Edison’s film crew stopped at Isleta Pueblo in 1897 and filmed a one-minute loop segment, movie-making in New Mexico has been a constant. The state’s film history includes nearly 700 feature films, television episodes, and made for cable/TV movies.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Militancy and Creativity in the Peruvian Amazon: A Forty-Year Perspective on the Awajún Struggle for Cultural Survival Michael Brown, President of the School for Advanced Research The Awajún (Aguaruna) people of Peru’s Upper Amazon have emerged as one of South America’s most influential indigenous societies, known for an ironclad commitment to self-determination and an ability to mobilize other indigenous peoples in common cause.
Governor Bent Field Trip
Friday, October 17, 2014, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Rebellion in Taos: the Uprising of 1847 Trip Leader: Robert J. Tórrez The years 1846 and 1847 were volatile times in New Mexico, particularly in Taos and Taos Pueblo. On January 19, 1847, Governor Bent, his brother-in-law, and four US-appointed local officials were murdered in Taos. The revolt against the newly instituted US authorities quickly spread to Mora and other communities in northern New Mexico.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt and Spanish Reconquest at Tunyo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico Joseph Aguilar, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR The first systematic investigations at the mesa-top refuge community of Tunyo at San Ildefonso Pueblo offer new insights into the pivotal post-revolt period of pueblo history, where in 1694 nine Tewa villages led a successful defense against the reconquest efforts of Don Diego de Vargas.
Nicole Taylor, Director of Scholar Programs, holding the 2012 J. I. Staley Prize Winning Book Lecture
Thursday, October 23, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Evolution and Women’s Lives Wenda Trevathan Biological anthropologist Wenda Trevathan discusses why our experiences with adolescence, pregnancy, birth, nursing, sexuality, and menopause have little in common with what is believed to have been the experience of our ancestors.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 29, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Changing Roles of Ethnicity and Education as Determinants of Fertility: The Case of Kinshasa David Shapiro, Professor of Economics, Demography and Women's Studies, Pennsylvania State University In the mid-1950s, a large-scale survey carried out in the Belgian Congo found substantial differences in fertility of different ethnic groups, with groups from the north of the country in particular showing comparatively low fertility and a high incidence of sterility.
Guaje Ruin Kiva in 2005 Field Trip
Friday, October 31, 2014, 8:00 am–4:00 pm Guaje Canyon: Archaeology and Fire on the Pajarito Plateau Trip Leaders: Rory Gauthier and Dr. Craig Allen One extensive group of ruins that we will visit lies on the high, narrow mesa north of Guaje Canyon. Here, at least seven ruins are spread along the crest of the mesa, including five kivas that are carved into the tufa bedrock. A string of fifty cavate rooms are found along the base of the canyon, which were accessible to the mesa village by hand- and toe-holds and carved stairs.
November 2014
Mexican Inquisition Sparks
Tuesday, November 11, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The Mexican Inquisition in Early Eighteenth-Century New Mexico Linda Tigges & Richard Salazar Early eighteenth-century documents in the Spanish Archives of New Mexico and Mexico City describe the inquisition investigations by the Franciscans into witchcraft, dress, marriage and bigamy, and other aspects of moral behavior of the New Mexico residents.
Colloquium
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free From Gypsy Work to EU Recycling: Waste, Race, and Environment in Bulgaria Elana Resnick, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Understanding how waste is produced, collected, stored, circulated, transformed, destroyed, and defined can tell us much about the organization of social life. This becomes clear when observing the Roma (Gypsy) minority in Bulgaria, who comprise about 10 percent of the total population.
December 2014
Olive Rush Sparks
Tuesday, December 9, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Olive Rush: Santa Fe's First Lady of the Arts Bettina Raphael Olive Rush, a painter from Quaker roots in Indiana in 1920, played a significant role in Santa Fe’s community as an artist, teacher, activist, and neighbor.
February 2015
Grandmother carrying child in Borana, Ethiopia Lecture
Thursday, February 19, 2015, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Grandmothers and Human Evolution Kristen Hawkes Anthropologist Kristen Hawkes considers the Grandmother Hypothesis that increased longevity is a key to the evolution of human life history and other features that distinguish us from the great apes.
March 2015
Human Diet Lecture
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Evolution of the Human Diet Leslie Aiello Anthropologist Leslie Aiello follows the evolution of human nutrition from our earliest ancestors to the modern day, drawing attention to the diversity in the human diet over time and its consequences.
May 2015
Jogging Couple Lecture
Thursday, May 7, 2015, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Why Exercise Really is the Best Medicine Daniel Lieberman Evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman investigates evidence that indicates the evolution of human hunting and gathering was made possible by a suite of adaptations that transformed our ancestors into superlative endurance athletes.

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