Calendar

Lectures, symposiums, artist open houses, colloquiums, field trips, and many other events are regularly sponsored by the School for Advanced Research (SAR). These are available to SAR members, and many also are open to the general public. All upcoming events are listed below.

September 2017
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo Colloquium
Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reconceptualizing Immigration as a Home-making Process: The Latinos in South Los Angeles Research Projects Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Southern California, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR In this lecture, Dr. Hondagneu-Sotelo presents empirical findings from a study of Latinos in South Los Angeles to help build a new framework of immigration as a home-making process. The presentation focuses attention on the significance of race, anti-Black racism, and generational differences among Latina/o immigrants in the immigrant-homemaking process, and suggests several concepts that highlight the significance of place and race in setting down roots in a historically African American mega-neighborhood. Please register in advance here.
Baskets made by Andrew Harvier Field Trip
Friday, September 29, 2017, 10:00 am–5:00 pm, $250 per person (price includes a $50 tax-deductible donation to SAR) Exploring Santa Clara/Rio Grande Pueblo Basketry and Touring Puye Cliffs On this trip, we will join Andrew and Judith Harvier in their home to explore the Rio Grande Pueblo basket making history and art form. The couple will also join us on our tour of Puye Cliffs where some 740 rooms are carved out of a 200-foot-high cliff ridge.
October 2017
Thomas Michael Swensen Colloquium
Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Great Land: The Environment and Belonging in Native Alaska Thomas Swensen, Assistant Professor, Division of Ethnic Studies, University of Utah, and Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR In this project the term “The Great Land” ties indigenous experience to the environment by focusing on compulsory Native belonging to Russia and later the United States amid ecological tragedies and land rights efforts that were paramount in shaping Alaska as a state in the union. From a Russian colony to a U.S. territory, Alaska saw the continued tension between harvesting natural resources and a Native labor force that fought for citizenship as well as for the recognition of their sovereignty. Please register in advance here.
Deanna Dartt Colloquium
Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mapping the Camino Indigenous: Reclaiming the Road on Our Terms Deana Dartt, Lecturer, Department of Museum Studies, University of Oregon, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The California Missions Foundation, a group of historians and Mission supporters seek UNESCO World Heritage designation for the “Royal Road,” which connected the Baja and Alta California Missions. Supplanting the emphasis on Spain, Tribal leaders along the greater California coast are currently exploring possible interventions to either counter the UNESCO designation or co-opt it. This lecture explores some of these efforts. Please register in advance here.
El Morro Bluff Field Trip
Friday, October 20–Saturday, October 21, 2017, (includes $50 tax-deductible donation to SAR) $575 person, double occupancy; $635 per person, single occupancy El Morro and Zuni Pueblo Ancestral Puebloans lived on top of the massive bluff known as El Morro, where they carved petroglyphs into the soft walls. Guided by Dr. Timothy Maxwell, we will visit the inscriptions and, if possible, the pueblo ruins. The trip also includes visits with Zuni artists, a guided trip to the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, a tour of Middle Village, and an exploration of Hawikkuh, one of the fabled Cities of Gold.
Milena Melo Colloquium
Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Life and Death in Everyday Life: Emergency Dialysis for Undocumented Immigrants Milena A. Melo, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, Mississippi State University, and Mellon Resident Scholar, SAR At this politically charged moment in time where the fate of immigrants in the U.S. is unknown, this presentation utilizes ethnography to highlight the drastic health implications and costs for undocumented immigrants who have been intentionally excluded from the healthcare system. This becomes especially critical in cases of life and death, such as emergency dialysis for undocumented immigrants suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Please register in advance here.
Robert L. Kelly Lecture
Thursday, October 26, 2017, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for Not-Yet-Members The Fifth Beginning: What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us about the Future Robert L. Kelly Robert Kelly identifies four pivot points in the history of human development, then looks ahead, giving us evidence for what he calls a fifth beginning during which he foresees the end of war, capitalism, and nation-states.
Robert L. Kelly Special Event
Friday, October 27, 2017, 10:00 am–12:00 pm, Free. Priority will be given to SAR members at the Chaco level and higher. Limited to 25 people. SAR Salon – The Fifth Beginning: What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us about the Future, Robert L. Kelly The Friday following the lecture, SAR will sponsor an informal salon discussion with Robert L. Kelly. This informal conversation will give a small number of participants an opportunity to engage directly with experts on topics of broad public interest.
November 2017
Héctor Beltrán Colloquium
Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Hacking Imaginaries: Codeworlds and Code Work Across the U.S./México Borderlands Héctor Beltrán, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California – Berkeley, and Mellon/ACLS Resident Scholar, SAR Drawing on extended ethnographic fieldwork between 2014 and 2016, this talk explores circulating forms of hacking and entrepreneurial development between the U.S. and México. How do young people who participate in these communities learn to fill overarching neoliberal agendas with substance, meaning, and materiality? Beltrán proposes that the emergence of the hacker indexes new ways of organizing and working in contemporary society. Please register in advance here.
 Faro Castillo del Morro lighthouse in Havana Field Trip
Wednesday, November 1–Wednesday, November 8, 2017, $5,095 double occupancy w/o airfare, includes $500 donation to SAR. $6,495 single occupancy w/o airfare, includes $500 donation to SAR Travel to Cuba: Havana, Cienfuegos, Trinidad, Matanzas Limited to 20 travelers. SAR invites you to join us on a very unique journey to Cuba with our own, SAR Director of Scholar Programs, Dr. Paul Ryer, a specialist in contemporary Cuban society who has lived in Cuba and studied its history and culture at the University of Havana. His personal knowledge and expertise in daily life in post-Soviet Cuba promises to provide an in depth exposure to a country of vast historical, cultural and political importance as we visit Havana, Cienfuegos, Trinidad, and Matanzas. To register for this trip, click here.
Brian Smithson Colloquium
Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Piety in Production: Video Film, Religious Improvisation, and Cosmopolitan Ethics in Bénin Brian Smithson, Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University, and Weatherhead/Charlotte Newcombe Resident Scholar, SAR Drawing upon two years of fieldwork in Southeastern Benin as a researcher, apprentice filmmaker, and amateur actor, Mr. Smithson argues that movie production allows followers of Yorùbá divinities to celebrate indigenous religion and thus speak back from the margins of the two wealthier film industries that surround them: Nigeria’s Nollywood, and the Beninese state’s publicly funded cinema. These productions bring Christians and Muslims together with Yorùbá movie crews creating a forum to negotiate norms of religious interaction, and to assert cultural importance on a global stage. Please register in advance here.
January 2018
Gabriella (Biella) Coleman Lecture
Thursday, January 25, 2018, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for Not-Yet-Members How Anonymous Dodged the Cyberterrorism Frame: Masking, Timing, and the Guy Fawkes Icon Gabriella (Biella) Coleman Biella Coleman will explore five reasons—stretching from the accidental adoption of the Guy Fawkes mask to the timing and nature of its many global interventions—to explain why Anonymous was able to narrowly evade this designation.
Gabriella (Biella) Coleman Special Event
Friday, January 26, 2018, 10:00 am–12:00 pm, Free. Priority will be given to SAR members at the Chaco level and higher. Limited to 25 people. SAR Salon – How Anonymous Dodged the Cyberterrorism Frame: Masking, Timing, and the Guy Fawkes Icon, Gabriella (Biella) Coleman The Friday following the lecture, SAR will sponsor an informal salon discussion with Gabriella (Biella) Coleman. This informal conversation will give a small number of participants an opportunity to engage directly with experts on topics of broad public interest.
March 2018
Natasha Dow Schüll Lecture
Thursday, March 22, 2018, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for Not-Yet-Members Data for Life: Wearable Technology and the Design of Self-Care Natasha Dow Schüll Natasha Dow Schüll will explore the vision of technologically assisted self-regulation that drives the design of wearable tracking devices. She will discuss how such products exemplify and short-circuit cultural ideals for individual responsibility and self-regulation.
Natasha Dow Schüll Special Event
Friday, March 23, 2018, 10:00–12:00 pm, Free. Priority will be given to SAR members at the Chaco level and higher. Limited to 25 people. SAR Salon – Data for Life: Wearable Technology and the Design of Self-Care, Natasha Dow Schüll The Friday following the lecture, SAR will sponsor an informal salon discussion with Natasha Dow Schüll. This informal conversation will give a small number of participants an opportunity to engage directly with experts on topics of broad public interest.
June 2018
Elizabeth Kolbert Lecture
Friday, June 1, 2018, 6:30–7:30 pm, Special Pricing; to be announced. The Fate of the Earth Elizabeth Kolbert Journalist Elizabeth Kolbert, staff writer at The New Yorker is best known for her Pulitzer Prize-winning book The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History (Holt, 2014), in which she presents evidence for her belief that humans may be bringing about a sixth mass extinction. She asks: Can we arrest this process? What does the future look like on a biologically impoverished planet?

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