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Gregorio Gonzales

Gregorio Gonzales

Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar

Using a rigorous research agenda, Gonzales’ analytical and methodological movements focus on particular histories and experiences of Genízaro social life within both valley communities. His study interrogates the structuration of intelligible, distinctly Indigenous existence vis-à-vis settler state and Indigenous power structures.

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Alison Heller

Alison Heller

Campbell Resident Scholar

Based on eighteen months of ethnographic research at four fistula repair centers in Niger, Dr. Heller complicates this narrative by demonstrating that most women with fistula exhibit significant personal resilience, receive continued social and familial support, and, unexpectedly, experience ambiguous surgical outcomes.

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Miriam Kolar

Miriam Kolar

Weatherhead Resident Scholar

Drawing on nearly a decade of fieldwork, experimental, experiential, and computational research, Dr. Kolar proposes to produce a manuscript suitable for both print and digital platforms that will pose and compare frameworks and methodologies for the study of sound in prehistory. Taking a broad view of sound-related evidence from ancient life, the project demonstrates how acoustical, psychoacoustical, and musical methodologies can be usefully interrelated in archaeological contexts, transcending normative disciplinary boundaries that separate the materiality and reception of sound from its abstract and cultural description.

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Nathaniel Millett

Nathaniel Millett

Weatherhead Resident Scholar

Afro-Indian Relations in the Anglo-Atlantic World: c. 1550-1842 is a major inter-disciplinary project which blends history, anthropology, and archaeology. The project is the first systematic analysis of black and Indian interactions over an expansive geographic and chronological setting that is based on primary research. Afro-Indian Relations begins with the earliest English forays into the Atlantic world, continues with the founding of English colonies and growing involvement with the slave trade and slavery, examines the maturation of Anglo-colonial societies, and concludes in the middle of the nineteenth century.

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David Romo

David Romo

Mellon Resident Scholar

Dr. Romo’s project explores the role of Allied and Axis propaganda and intelligence in shaping the U.S.-Mexico border between 1933 and 1945. Although much of the contemporary literature characterizes the so-called globalization of the U.S.-Mexico border as a relatively recent development linked to current immigration issues, drug smuggling and militarization, Romo argues that World War II marked an important turning point in these developments.

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Luis Urrieta

Luis Urrieta

Anne Ray Resident Scholar

This study centers on a mothers’ movement for better educational opportunities for their children in rural Mexico. The mothers protested historical neglect in education for rural and indigenous communities. The protest led to brutalization of the participants, but did not deter them from seeking an educational alternative. By re/claiming an indigenous identity in a de-indianized pueblo, they received a new school, Nueva Creación, which became a symbol of reclaimed indigeneity and opportunity. The mothers’ movement contributes insight into, 1) renewed indigeneities, 2) understanding agency, and 3) sobrevivencia in rural neoliberal agricultural communities. Dr. Urrieta examines these insights in Resurgent Indigeneity.

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