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Message from the President

May 2021

Because of the continuing risk of community transmission of the COVID-19 virus, SAR’s campus remains closed until public health authorities deem it safe for us to resume in-person events.

In 2020 we transitioned from live events to a robust schedule of online offerings that include behind-the-scenes access to our scholars, artists, and collections.

Our online events have given us new ways to share innovative content that illuminates topics of broad public concern.  Online platforms allow us to serve our longstanding members as well as a growing global audience. With challenge comes opportunity.

We expect to resume some in-person events by mid-summer 2021.  Until then, I invite you to join us as we pursue SAR’s important mission by electronic means.


 

Explore recordings of our most recent programs and subscribe to our YouTube channel: 

Michael Brown, President of SAR

Michael F. Brown
President

A book talk with Theresa Pasqual, Paul F. Reed, and Gary M. Brown, of Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan (SAR Press, 2018). This conversation shares more on the history and ongoing importance of several Chaco Canyon outlier sites across the Southwest’s Middle San Juan region.

About the publication: Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan is a winner of the 2019 New Mexico–Arizona Book Award.

Often overshadowed by the Ancestral Pueblo centers at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, the Middle San Juan is one of the most dynamic territories in the pre-Hispanic Southwest, interacting with Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, as well as the surrounding regions. This ancient Puebloan heartland was instrumental in tying together Chaco and Mesa Verde cultures to create a distinctive blend of old and new, local and nonlocal. The contributors to this book attribute the development of Salmon and Aztec to migration and colonization by people from Chaco Canyon. Rather than fighting for control over the territory, Chaco migrants and local leaders worked together to build the great houses of Aztec and Salmon while maintaining their identities and connections with their individual homelands. As a result of this collaboration, the Middle San Juan can be seen as one of the ancient Puebloan heartlands that made important contributions to contemporary Puebloan society.

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvncedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

A book talk with Theresa Pasqual, Paul F. Reed, and Gary M. Brown, of Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan (SAR Press, 2018). This conversation shares more on the history and ongoing importance of several Chaco Canyon outlier sites across the Southwest’s Middle San Juan region.

About the publication: Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan is a winner of the 2019 New Mexico–Arizona Book Award.

Often overshadowed by the Ancestral Pueblo centers at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, the Middle San Juan is one of the most dynamic territories in the pre-Hispanic Southwest, interacting with Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, as well as the surrounding regions. This ancient Puebloan heartland was instrumental in tying together Chaco and Mesa Verde cultures to create a distinctive blend of old and new, local and nonlocal. The contributors to this book attribute the development of Salmon and Aztec to migration and colonization by people from Chaco Canyon. Rather than fighting for control over the territory, Chaco migrants and local leaders worked together to build the great houses of Aztec and Salmon while maintaining their identities and connections with their individual homelands. As a result of this collaboration, the Middle San Juan can be seen as one of the ancient Puebloan heartlands that made important contributions to contemporary Puebloan society.

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvncedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

8 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLnNmb2JTOHRJQWN3

SAR Press Book Talk: Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan

SAR School for Advanced Research 486 views April 24, 2021 8:34 am

Continuing the 2020-2021 Creative Thought Forum series at the School for Advanced Research, Giorgio Patrini, the cofounder and CEO of Sensity -- http://www.sensity.ai/ -- an Amsterdam-based cybersecurity company, presents an exploration of deepfake videos.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/

Join SAR with our new virtual membership: https://sarweb.org/membership/join-virtual/
 
AI-generated audiovisual media has gathered significant attention in the news, on social media platforms, and from security experts and governments alike. Since 2017, these realistic-seeming videos and audio have been referred to as “deepfakes.” The significance of deepfakes is explained by three elements. First, we overview capabilities and accessibility of the technology, and its trend towards commodification. Second, we discuss real-world cases of weaponization and other near-term consequences. Third and finally, we consider the technological countermeasures currently being researchers and the industry.

About the speaker: Dr. Giorgio Patrini, is Cofounder and CEO at Sensity, an Amsterdam-based cybersecurity company that protects individuals and organizations from visual threats online, such as “deepfakes.” He holds an MEng in Computer Engineering at Milan Polytechnic in 2011, and PhD on Machine Learning from the Australian National University in 2016 with a thesis on the robustness of deep neural networks to noise. He held postdoctoral research positions within the Australian Federal Governments working on privacy-preserving machine learning and at the University of Amsterdam with research on deep generative models. In 2012 he cofounded Waynaut, a startup acquired by lastminute.com

The 2021 Creative Thought Forum is supported by: 

Ambassador
Paloheimo Foundation

Leader
Adobo Catering
Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery
Thornburg Investment Management
Flora Crichton Lecture Fund
Luke J. and Betty M. Vortman Endowment Fund
Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation
SAR Founders’ Society Members

Underwriters
Dan Merians, UBS Financial Services
First National Bank 1870

Supporters
New Mexico Bank & Trust
Darlene Streit, Santa Fe Real Estate Property
Walter Burke Catering

Media Sponsors
American Anthropological Association
KUNM 89.9 FM and KSFR 101.1 FM
Mark Sublette ~ Art Dealer Diaries
Native American Art Magazine
Southwest Contemporary

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

Continuing the 2020-2021 Creative Thought Forum series at the School for Advanced Research, Giorgio Patrini, the cofounder and CEO of Sensity, an Amsterdam-based cybersecurity company, presents an exploration of deepfake videos.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/

Join SAR with our new virtual membership: https://sarweb.org/membership/join-virtual/

AI-generated audiovisual media has gathered significant attention in the news, on social media platforms, and from security experts and governments alike. Since 2017, these realistic-seeming videos and audio have been referred to as “deepfakes.” The significance of deepfakes is explained by three elements. First, we overview capabilities and accessibility of the technology, and its trend towards commodification. Second, we discuss real-world cases of weaponization and other near-term consequences. Third and finally, we consider the technological countermeasures currently being researchers and the industry.

About the speaker: Dr. Giorgio Patrini, is Cofounder and CEO at Sensity, an Amsterdam-based cybersecurity company that protects individuals and organizations from visual threats online, such as “deepfakes.” He holds an MEng in Computer Engineering at Milan Polytechnic in 2011, and PhD on Machine Learning from the Australian National University in 2016 with a thesis on the robustness of deep neural networks to noise. He held postdoctoral research positions within the Australian Federal Governments working on privacy-preserving machine learning and at the University of Amsterdam with research on deep generative models. In 2012 he cofounded Waynaut, a startup acquired by lastminute.com

The 2021 Creative Thought Forum is supported by:

Ambassador
Paloheimo Foundation

Leader
Adobo Catering
Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery
Thornburg Investment Management
Flora Crichton Lecture Fund
Luke J. and Betty M. Vortman Endowment Fund
Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation
SAR Founders’ Society Members

Underwriters
Dan Merians, UBS Financial Services
First National Bank 1870

Supporters
New Mexico Bank & Trust
Darlene Streit, Santa Fe Real Estate Property
Walter Burke Catering

Media Sponsors
American Anthropological Association
KUNM 89.9 FM and KSFR 101.1 FM
Mark Sublette ~ Art Dealer Diaries
Native American Art Magazine
Southwest Contemporary

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

6 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLmk2dldpWlNiWkZ3

Deepfakes: Commodification, Consequences and Countermeasures

SAR School for Advanced Research 215 views April 8, 2021 9:16 pm

Affirming Indigenous Representation: The Future of Native Art and Collections at The Metropolitan Museum of Art with keynote speaker Dr. Patricia Norby (Purépecha)

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/

In recent years, The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) has committed to expanding its vision for Native American art. That commitment was further affirmed in September 2020 when The Met hired Dr. Patricia Norby as the museum’s first Indigenous curator and first full-time curator of Native American Art in its 150-year history. Dr. Norby previously served as Senior Executive and Assistant Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian-New York, and as Director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at The Newberry, in Chicago. Join keynote speaker, Dr. Norby, as she speaks about Indigenous representation at The Met and shares her vision for the future of the museum’s Native art and collections.

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

Affirming Indigenous Representation: The Future of Native Art and Collections at The Metropolitan Museum of Art with keynote speaker Dr. Patricia Norby (Purépecha)

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/

In recent years, The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) has committed to expanding its vision for Native American art. That commitment was further affirmed in September 2020 when The Met hired Dr. Patricia Norby as the museum’s first Indigenous curator and first full-time curator of Native American Art in its 150-year history. Dr. Norby previously served as Senior Executive and Assistant Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian-New York, and as Director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at The Newberry, in Chicago. Join keynote speaker, Dr. Norby, as she speaks about Indigenous representation at The Met and shares her vision for the future of the museum’s Native art and collections.

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

7 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLkRHSW8xdlByN3V3

Affirming Indigenous Representation, Native Art & Collections at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

SAR School for Advanced Research 194 views April 1, 2021 3:15 pm

As part of the fourth annual Creative Thought Forum at the School for Advanced Research, journalist and author Anna Merlan presents an online presentation and live Q&A. 

Consider making a donation to SAR so that our programs can remain free of charge and accessible to a broad and diverse audience. Donate today: https://sarweb.org/donate/

Conspiracy theories have always been a factor in the public discourse of the United States and many other countries. But the past four years have shown the new power that lies and disinformation have, especially electoral and medical conspiracy theories. As we move forward, what role should we expect those types of disinformation and lies to play in our discourse? And how — if at all — can we fight them?

About the speaker:

Anna Merlan is a journalist specializing in conspiracy theories, subcultures, new religious movements, crime, politics and women’s lives. Merlan is a reporter at the Features Desk at Vice News. She was previously a senior reporter with the Special Projects Desk, the investigative division of Gizmodo Media Group, and a staff writer at Jezebel, the Village Voice and the Dallas Observer. Learn more about her 2019 book, Republic of Lies: American Conspiracy Theorists and Their Surprising Rise to Power.

The 2021 Creative Thought Forum is supported by: 

Ambassador
Paloheimo Foundation

Leader
Adobo Catering
Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery
Thornburg Investment Management
Flora Crichton Lecture Fund
Luke J. and Betty M. Vortman Endowment Fund
Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation
SAR Founders’ Society Members

Underwriters
Dan Merians, UBS Financial Services
First National Bank 1870

Supporters
New Mexico Bank & Trust
Darlene Streit, Santa Fe Real Estate Property
Walter Burke Catering

Media Sponsors
American Anthropological Association
KUNM 89.9 FM and KSFR 101.1 FM
Mark Sublette ~ Art Dealer Diaries
Native American Art Magazine
Southwest Contemporary

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

As part of the fourth annual Creative Thought Forum at the School for Advanced Research, journalist and author Anna Merlan presents an online presentation and live Q&A.

Consider making a donation to SAR so that our programs can remain free of charge and accessible to a broad and diverse audience. Donate today: https://sarweb.org/donate/

Conspiracy theories have always been a factor in the public discourse of the United States and many other countries. But the past four years have shown the new power that lies and disinformation have, especially electoral and medical conspiracy theories. As we move forward, what role should we expect those types of disinformation and lies to play in our discourse? And how — if at all — can we fight them?

About the speaker:

Anna Merlan is a journalist specializing in conspiracy theories, subcultures, new religious movements, crime, politics and women’s lives. Merlan is a reporter at the Features Desk at Vice News. She was previously a senior reporter with the Special Projects Desk, the investigative division of Gizmodo Media Group, and a staff writer at Jezebel, the Village Voice and the Dallas Observer. Learn more about her 2019 book, Republic of Lies: American Conspiracy Theorists and Their Surprising Rise to Power.

The 2021 Creative Thought Forum is supported by:

Ambassador
Paloheimo Foundation

Leader
Adobo Catering
Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery
Thornburg Investment Management
Flora Crichton Lecture Fund
Luke J. and Betty M. Vortman Endowment Fund
Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation
SAR Founders’ Society Members

Underwriters
Dan Merians, UBS Financial Services
First National Bank 1870

Supporters
New Mexico Bank & Trust
Darlene Streit, Santa Fe Real Estate Property
Walter Burke Catering

Media Sponsors
American Anthropological Association
KUNM 89.9 FM and KSFR 101.1 FM
Mark Sublette ~ Art Dealer Diaries
Native American Art Magazine
Southwest Contemporary

____

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

21 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLms2VEVEUGRlZTI4

Republic of Lies: How Conspiracy Theories Took Over American Public Life

SAR School for Advanced Research 767 views March 19, 2021 6:08 am

A New Era for Indigenous Art in Museums with Ian Kuali’i (Kanaka Maoli and Mescalero Apache), Marie Watt (Seneca Nation), and Erin Joyce.

In September 2020, Larger than Memory, a groundbreaking exhibition of contemporary Indigenous art opened at the Heard Museum in the midst of the global pandemic. Join curator, Erin Joyce in conversation with featured artists Ian Kuali’i (2019 Dubin fellow) and Marie Watt, as they explore the potential roles of artists in exhibition development and how this type of collaboration can challenge the way that museums function. Speakers will also be asked to consider the impact of the pandemic on the exhibition, and whether their practices will shift to be more virtual moving forward.

This event was presented as part of the School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center's 2021 speaker series: Museums Pivot: Shifting Paradigms for Collaboration. 

The School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center presents a series of conversations exploring efforts to foster collaboration between museums and communities. Over the years, documents like SAR’s Guidelines for Collaboration have focused on person-to-person collaboration after realizing the critical importance of community input and partnerships within the museum field. This series highlights the history that led to this moment and current innovative partnerships, but also explores the potential of virtual and remote collaboration in the midst or wake of a global pandemic. This series celebrates the successes the field has witnessed as museum professionals, community members, and artists have had to pivot and adapt. In this series, we will hear from presenters who can speak to their experiences of the past year to share what they have learned as well as how they envision future community collaboration and participation in an increasingly digitized field.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/​ 

Join SAR today: https://sarweb.org/membership/join/​

------

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

A New Era for Indigenous Art in Museums with Ian Kuali’i (Kanaka Maoli and Mescalero Apache), Marie Watt (Seneca Nation), and Erin Joyce.

In September 2020, Larger than Memory, a groundbreaking exhibition of contemporary Indigenous art opened at the Heard Museum in the midst of the global pandemic. Join curator, Erin Joyce in conversation with featured artists Ian Kuali’i (2019 Dubin fellow) and Marie Watt, as they explore the potential roles of artists in exhibition development and how this type of collaboration can challenge the way that museums function. Speakers will also be asked to consider the impact of the pandemic on the exhibition, and whether their practices will shift to be more virtual moving forward.

This event was presented as part of the School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center's 2021 speaker series: Museums Pivot: Shifting Paradigms for Collaboration.

The School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center presents a series of conversations exploring efforts to foster collaboration between museums and communities. Over the years, documents like SAR’s Guidelines for Collaboration have focused on person-to-person collaboration after realizing the critical importance of community input and partnerships within the museum field. This series highlights the history that led to this moment and current innovative partnerships, but also explores the potential of virtual and remote collaboration in the midst or wake of a global pandemic. This series celebrates the successes the field has witnessed as museum professionals, community members, and artists have had to pivot and adapt. In this series, we will hear from presenters who can speak to their experiences of the past year to share what they have learned as well as how they envision future community collaboration and participation in an increasingly digitized field.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/​

Join SAR today: https://sarweb.org/membership/join/​

------

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch​, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

6 1

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLjdkTHR5MXFuSWxJ

A New Era for Indigenous Art in Museums

SAR School for Advanced Research 261 views March 18, 2021 9:59 am

Making Medicine: Apsáalooke Conversations on Land, Water, Culture and Art
With Nina Sanders (Apsáalooke), Ben Pease (Apsáalooke), and Joree La France (Apsáalooke)

Three Apsáalooke intellectuals present a conversation about the land, water, culture, and art. 

As a new generation of Indigenous thinkers, scholars, leaders, and artists enter a novel era of worldviews and creation they are faced with the increasing pressure to protect the culture, the community, and most importantly the land. 

Listen as each speaker shares about their work and what it means to give-back, protect, make medicine, and how these values translate to their work with museums and other cultural institutions.

This event was presented as part of the School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center's 2021 speaker series: Museums Pivot: Shifting Paradigms for Collaboration. 

The School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center presents a series of conversations exploring efforts to foster collaboration between museums and communities. Over the years, documents like SAR’s Guidelines for Collaboration have focused on person-to-person collaboration after realizing the critical importance of community input and partnerships within the museum field. This series highlights the history that led to this moment and current innovative partnerships, but also explores the potential of virtual and remote collaboration in the midst or wake of a global pandemic. This series celebrates the successes the field has witnessed as museum professionals, community members, and artists have had to pivot and adapt. In this series, we will hear from presenters who can speak to their experiences of the past year to share what they have learned as well as how they envision future community collaboration and participation in an increasingly digitized field.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/ 

Join SAR today: https://sarweb.org/membership/join/

------

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

Making Medicine: Apsáalooke Conversations on Land, Water, Culture and Art
With Nina Sanders (Apsáalooke), Ben Pease (Apsáalooke), and Joree La France (Apsáalooke)

Three Apsáalooke intellectuals present a conversation about the land, water, culture, and art.

As a new generation of Indigenous thinkers, scholars, leaders, and artists enter a novel era of worldviews and creation they are faced with the increasing pressure to protect the culture, the community, and most importantly the land.

Listen as each speaker shares about their work and what it means to give-back, protect, make medicine, and how these values translate to their work with museums and other cultural institutions.

This event was presented as part of the School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center's 2020 speaker series: Museums Pivot: Shifting Paradigms for Collaboration.

The School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center presents a series of conversations exploring efforts to foster collaboration between museums and communities. Over the years, documents like SAR’s Guidelines for Collaboration have focused on person-to-person collaboration after realizing the critical importance of community input and partnerships within the museum field. This series highlights the history that led to this moment and current innovative partnerships, but also explores the potential of virtual and remote collaboration in the midst or wake of a global pandemic. This series celebrates the successes the field has witnessed as museum professionals, community members, and artists have had to pivot and adapt. In this series, we will hear from presenters who can speak to their experiences of the past year to share what they have learned as well as how they envision future community collaboration and participation in an increasingly digitized field.

Support SAR: https://sarweb.org/donate/

Join SAR today: https://sarweb.org/membership/join/

------

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/​, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

6 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLmZjRTJzS0V2LU0w

Making Medicine: Apsáalooke Conversations on Land, Water, Culture and Art

SAR School for Advanced Research 142 views March 10, 2021 11:25 pm

UPCOMING PROGRAMS
During this time of “social distancing,” SAR has shifted access to all our events and programs to online formats. We will continue our commitment to providing engaging and thought-provoking perspectives from leading scholars and artists. Please continue your participation as an important member of our community by registering and joining us at the events below.

STAY CONNECTED

For details on all upcoming public programs, sign up for our email list to receive weekly updates:

Online Colloquium: 2020-2021 Anne Ray Interns @ Hosted online. Register below.
May 20 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Online Colloquium: 2020-2021 Anne Ray Interns @ Hosted online. Register below.
2:00 pm
REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE   SAR’s 2020-2021 Anne Ray interns share an online presentation on their research and reflect on their time at SAR.   Shándíín Brown “Evolution in Indian Country: The Impact of[...]
Artist Talk with Neebinnaukzhik Southall @ Hosted online. Register below.
May 27 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Artist Talk with Neebinnaukzhik Southall @ Hosted online. Register below.
4:30 pm
REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE Neebinnaukzhik Southall (Chippewas of Rama First Nation) is a Santa Fe based graphic designer and illustrator. While at SAR, Southall has been researching the IARC’s collection and working on developing[...]
Virtual Happy Hour presented by SAR and the Santa Fe Symphony: “Tate Meets Mozart” @ Hosted online
5:00 pm
Virtual Happy Hour presented by SAR and the Santa Fe Symphony “Tate Meets Mozart” with Jerod Impichchaachaaha’ Tate and Daniel Crupi   As members of SAR’s President’s Circle, Founders’ Society, and Legacy Circle, along with[...]
ENGAGE
Members Matter: Russ and Diane Kyncl

Members Matter: Russ and Diane Kyncl

SAR members Russ and Diane Kyncl share the fifty-year story of how they became friends with the Edaakie family of Zuni Pueblo, how the late potter Timothy Edaakie helped them to connect with SAR, and why they decided to include SAR in their legacy plan.

read more
Spider Woman’s Knowledge and the Survival of Diné Textile Arts

Spider Woman’s Knowledge and the Survival of Diné Textile Arts

In each session of his course on Navajo weaving, artist Venancio Aragon takes his students on a journey that exposes the impact of non-Indigenous institutions on Diné peoples and their making, as well as the sovereignty that Indigenous peoples, including artists, have continued to exercise through each moment.

read more
How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to Alina Méndez

How to Publish Your First Book: SAR Press Talks to Alina Méndez

SAR Press is starting a new blog series comprised of interviews with diverse scholars who have recently published or are in the midst of publishing their first book and who can offer guidance and encouragement to colleagues who are just starting to think about publishing. We hope that these interviews make a small contribution to supporting junior scholars as they begin the publishing process.

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