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Message from the President

July-August 2022

I’m pleased to announce that SAR has restarted public tours and events. Campus tours have resumed, as have tours of the Indian Arts Research Center—in the latter case, on a more limited basis in July as the IARC carefully moves more than a hundred Pueblo pots to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture for the opening of Grounded in Clay on July 31. Updated information on tour availability can be accessed here.  We continue to request that visitors wear masks when inside SAR’s buildings.

Meanwhile, our robust schedule of online offerings will continue indefinitely.

Our online events have given us new ways to share innovative content that illuminates topics of broad public interest. Online platforms allow us to serve our longstanding members as well as a growing global audience. I invite you to join us as we pursue SAR’s important mission by electronic means if you cannot participate in person.  The list of upcoming events on this homepage is the best way to follow our in-person and online offerings.


Explore recordings of our most recent programs and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Michael Brown, President of SAR

Michael F. Brown
President

Artist Talk with Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty

SAR School for Advanced Research 128 views June 23, 2022 12:54 pm

Adriana Linares-Palma, PhD candidate, Department of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, and SAR’s 2021 Paloheimo fellow.

In this talk, Linares-Palma will focus on the politics of archaeological knowledge production in Guatemala. Analyzing the current state of archaeology and its national agenda in relation to the research of the past, Linares-Palma explores what has been accomplished in efforts to decolonize the field; how community-based research at San Juan Cotzal positions archaeology against social inequality; and what principal challenges remain. Her research examines the relationship between Indigenous communities and their spirituality, memory, and archaeological sites, and she stresses the right of Indigenous peoples to prior consultation in archaeological research.

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LEARN MORE ABOUT SAR
https://sarweb.org/ 

ABOUT THE SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH
Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

Adriana Linares-Palma, PhD candidate, Department of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, and SAR’s 2021 Paloheimo fellow.

In this talk, Linares-Palma will focus on the politics of archaeological knowledge production in Guatemala. Analyzing the current state of archaeology and its national agenda in relation to the research of the past, Linares-Palma explores what has been accomplished in efforts to decolonize the field; how community-based research at San Juan Cotzal positions archaeology against social inequality; and what principal challenges remain. Her research examines the relationship between Indigenous communities and their spirituality, memory, and archaeological sites, and she stresses the right of Indigenous peoples to prior consultation in archaeological research.

------------------------------------------

LEARN MORE ABOUT SAR
https://sarweb.org/

ABOUT THE SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH
Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

8 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLkUzVUdHbHlaQ3Rv

Mapping the Constellation of Memory: Engaged Archaeological Research in San Juan Cotzal

SAR School for Advanced Research 129 views June 17, 2022 2:20 pm

At the Altar, On the Table: Interpreting Religion and Everyday Life  in a Seventeenth-Century New Mexico Mission

Klinton Burgio-Ericson, postdoctoral fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, and SAR’s 2021 Mellon fellow.

Contrary to popular belief, early colonial missions in New Mexico were not cloistered retreats for the Spanish missionaries who hoped to convert Pueblo Indians to Christianity. Rather, missions were living and working places made up of mixed households of mendicant friars and coerced Indigenous laborers, through whom traces of Pueblo cosmology, belief, cuisine, and practices became entangled with Spanish culture. In the architectural forms and practices of their missions, friars invoked millenarian and monastic ideals, while Pueblo peoples persevered in conceiving of their towns as sacred centers in an animate world. Drawing upon primary sources, oral histories, archaeological evidence, and comparative analysis, Burgio-Ericson considers the intersections of ritual and everyday life in seventeenth-century New Mexico by focusing on a Franciscan mission at the ancestral Zuni town of Hawikku Pueblo. His research illuminates an understudied yet foundational chapter of American history, emphasizing the crucial role of Native and Latinx people in shaping the contested nature of today’s society.

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This event was part of the 2021 School for Advanced Research fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Learn more about SAR: https://sarweb.org/ 

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

At the Altar, On the Table: Interpreting Religion and Everyday Life  in a Seventeenth-Century New Mexico Mission

Klinton Burgio-Ericson, postdoctoral fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, and SAR’s 2021 Mellon fellow.

Contrary to popular belief, early colonial missions in New Mexico were not cloistered retreats for the Spanish missionaries who hoped to convert Pueblo Indians to Christianity. Rather, missions were living and working places made up of mixed households of mendicant friars and coerced Indigenous laborers, through whom traces of Pueblo cosmology, belief, cuisine, and practices became entangled with Spanish culture. In the architectural forms and practices of their missions, friars invoked millenarian and monastic ideals, while Pueblo peoples persevered in conceiving of their towns as sacred centers in an animate world. Drawing upon primary sources, oral histories, archaeological evidence, and comparative analysis, Burgio-Ericson considers the intersections of ritual and everyday life in seventeenth-century New Mexico by focusing on a Franciscan mission at the ancestral Zuni town of Hawikku Pueblo. His research illuminates an understudied yet foundational chapter of American history, emphasizing the crucial role of Native and Latinx people in shaping the contested nature of today’s society.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

This event was part of the 2021 School for Advanced Research fall scholar colloquia series. Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Learn more about SAR: https://sarweb.org/

About the School for Advanced Research (SAR): Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

5 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLlhYWmVOa0JLTzA4

At the Altar, On the Table: Interpreting Religion and Life  in a Seventeenth-Century NM Mission

SAR School for Advanced Research 165 views June 17, 2022 2:20 pm

Dmitri Brown, PhD candidate, Department of History, University of California, Davis, and SAR’s 2021 Katrin H. Lamon fellow.

In late 1942, Manhattan Project officials evaluated potential locations for their scientific headquarters. They found a site that met their needs on the Pajarito Plateau in the western hills of the Tewa Pueblo world. Employing traditional patterns and dynamics, Tewa communities had long drawn strength from accommodating potentially shattering modern incursions like the railroad, pottery markets, and archaeology. They used these same traditions and experiences to meet the coming of the atomic age. Viewing the Manhattan Project in the context of the Tewa world, Brown’s talk offers an opportunity to understand the connections between physics, history, and Tewa philosophy.

------------------------------------------

LEARN MORE ABOUT SAR
https://sarweb.org/ 

ABOUT THE SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH
Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

Dmitri Brown, PhD candidate, Department of History, University of California, Davis, and SAR’s 2021 Katrin H. Lamon fellow.

In late 1942, Manhattan Project officials evaluated potential locations for their scientific headquarters. They found a site that met their needs on the Pajarito Plateau in the western hills of the Tewa Pueblo world. Employing traditional patterns and dynamics, Tewa communities had long drawn strength from accommodating potentially shattering modern incursions like the railroad, pottery markets, and archaeology. They used these same traditions and experiences to meet the coming of the atomic age. Viewing the Manhattan Project in the context of the Tewa world, Brown’s talk offers an opportunity to understand the connections between physics, history, and Tewa philosophy.

------------------------------------------

LEARN MORE ABOUT SAR
https://sarweb.org/

ABOUT THE SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH
Founded in 1907, the School for Advanced Research (SAR) is one of North America’s preeminent independent institutes for the study of anthropology, related social sciences and humanities. SAR is home to the Indian Arts Research Center, one of the nation’s most important Southwest Native American art research collections. Through prestigious scholar residency and artist fellowship programs, public programs and SAR Press, SAR advances intellectual inquiry in order to better understand humankind in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Additional information on the work of our resident scholars and Native American artists is available on the SAR website: https://sarweb.org/ , on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schoolforadvancedresearch, and on Twitter: @schadvresearch.

7 0

YouTube Video VVVIRmxyU0M4WElMeEdIaXdVVzh1ZXdRLlI3Y1VWXy1wVFVB

Tewa Pueblos at the Dawn of Atomic Modernity

SAR School for Advanced Research 190 views June 17, 2022 2:20 pm

UPCOMING PROGRAMS
During this time of “social distancing,” SAR has shifted access to all our events and programs to online formats. We will continue our commitment to providing engaging and thought-provoking perspectives from leading scholars and artists. Please continue your participation as an important member of our community by registering and joining us at the events below.

STAY CONNECTED

For details on all upcoming public programs, sign up for our email list to receive weekly updates:

Walking History Tour of the SAR Campus @ School for Advanced Research
Aug 19 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Walking History Tour of the SAR Campus @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States
10:00 am
Map of El Delirio (1927), now SAR’s campus Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens—including the famous pet cemetery—of the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White. The secluded[...]
Aug 23 @ 8:00 am – Aug 25 @ 6:00 pm
Member Trip to Chaco Canyon with Four Corners Archaeologist Steve Lekson @ Chaco Canyon
8:00 am
Journey to Chaco Country with Four Corners Archaeologist Steve Lekson DATES: August 23-25, 2022 Cost per person: Double Occupancy: $1,395 (Includes a $100 non-refundable tax-deductible donation to SAR) Single Occupancy: $1,520 (Includes a $100 non-refundable[...]
Aug 25 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Rose Simpson @ SAR's Instagram page | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States
6:00 pm
JOIN INSTAGRAM HERE Tune into SAR Artists Live on Thursday, August 25 at 6:00 p.m. MDT!   SAR Artists Live is a broadcast that takes place on Instagram Live. Missed our virtual event? Past recordings[...]
ENGAGE

‘Who Were You When You Stepped to This Pot?’ :

‘Who Were You When You Stepped to This Pot?’1: A Lesson in Community Curation from Grounded in Clay Guest post by Emily SanthanamConsider when and where you’ve seen Pueblo pottery in a museum. How was it displayed? Who wrote the label? What did it tell you about the...

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Many thanks for your continued support of SAR during this challenging time. Your contribution makes it possible for us to deliver quality content virtually that furthers our mission to explore humanity and better understand the world we live in. Never has there been a more important time to do this work. As we navigate the current environment, we welcome your input, questions, and suggestions. You can reach us at development@sarsf.org.

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