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Sep
23
Sun
2018
“Pueblo Textiles and Embroideries.” @ St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art
Sep 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Embroidered Acoma Pueblo cape or manta, unknown maker, c. 1850-1860, catalog number IAF.T468, photo by Addison Doty, 2015

Embroidered Acoma Pueblo cape or manta, unknown maker, c. 1850-1860, catalog number IAF.T468, photo by Addison Doty, 2015

Cost per person: $10 (for members and non-members)

Brian Vallo, Director of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center, and a panel of former SAR Native American Artist Fellows explore the history and evolution of textile arts in Pueblo communities. Panel includes: Louie Garcia from the Prio Manso Tiwa tribe of Guadalupe Pueblo in Las Cruces, known for revitalizing historic pueblo weaving techniques; Ramona Sakiestewa, a contemporary Hopi artist who lives and works in Santa Fe and is known for tapestries and architectural public art installations; and, Isabel Gonzales of Jemez Pueblo credited for reintroducing historic pueblo embroidery on both traditional and non-traditional textiles. The panel will discuss how the collection, the SAR fellowship, and access to the IARC collections advanced their careers as artists and keepers of traditional knowledge associated with the textile tradition.

Presentations and panel discussions will take place at St. Francis Auditorium at 107 West Palace Ave. at the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

To register for this event please click here.

Special tours of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center’s collections of nearly 12,000 items of Southwestern Native American art, including pottery, textiles, basketry, jewelry, carvings and more, will be available for the first 30 registrants. To register for these special tours, click here. Fee for non-members is $15; free to members. To join SAR, click here. For more information on these special tours and other tours, please call or email Daniel Kurnit at 505-954-7272 or at kurnit@sarsf.org

New Mexico Museum of Art Logo

This program is presented in partnership with the New Mexico Museum of Art in honor of their centennial celebration, SAR’s 110th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) at SAR.


New Mexico Humanities Council

Funding for this program is provided in part by a grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council.