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Oct
1
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 1 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.


Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

Explore the history and evolution of rock art across the Rio Grande Basin with archaeologist, Richard Ford. This four-part course introduces participants to a wide range of rock art including Paleo-Indian, Early/Middle/Late Archaic, historic Pueblo, and the migratory Plains style. Learn how to identify rock art, record the works, and where to find nearby examples. This course is presented in four parts:

October 1: Cupules (their manufacture and meaning) with class demonstration
– Paleo-Indian rock art: what it means and where you find it
– Conventions and protocol for recording rock art

October 8: Archaic Rock Art
– The importance of shamanism and sacred shrines in the Archaic, the meaning of abstract art, and the Rowe Mesa rock art tour
– Early Archaic
– Middle Archaic
– Late Archaic and Transitional rock art

October 15: Ancestral Pueblo imagery: styles, meaning, and history

October 22: Historic Hispanic, Genízaro, and Catholic religious imagery
– Migratory Plains Indian rock art (Ute, Jicarilla Apache, and Comanche glyphs)
– Anglo-American images
– Where to find rock art in the greater Santa Fe area

Course Leader:

Richard I. Ford

Richard Ford, Arthur F. Thurnau Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, completed his BA in anthropology at Oberlin College and then his PhD in anthropology at the University of Michigan, where he rose to the rank of full professor of anthropology and botany. While at Michigan, he had administrative appointments as curator of ethnology and director of the Ethnobotanical Laboratory in the Museum of Anthropology, director of the Museum of Anthropology, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, and associate dean of research and computing in the Literary College.

Professor Ford’s ethnobotanical research took him to Poland, Tunisia, Kenya, Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, China, and several Midwestern and Southwestern states. Based on this travel, he published 135 articles and chapters and nine research monographs.

He received numerous awards from professional organizations including the Amal Amique Award in India, Distinguished Ethnobiologist from the Society of Ethnobiology, the Fryxell Award from the Society of American Archaeology, the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous local honors.

Now residing in Santa Fe, Ford is an active lecturer and archaeology tour guide. He also serves as an expert witness for several pueblos in their land and water cases.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 1, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 8, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 15, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $175 for members; $225 for non-members; $150 for members registered for the September 26, 2019, member field trip.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Photo:Shield figure with four pointed star, Mesa Prieta. Photo by Curt Schaafsma

Oct
8
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 8 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.


Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

Explore the history and evolution of rock art across the Rio Grande Basin with archaeologist, Richard Ford. This four-part course introduces participants to a wide range of rock art including Paleo-Indian, Early/Middle/Late Archaic, historic Pueblo, and the migratory Plains style. Learn how to identify rock art, record the works, and where to find nearby examples. This course is presented in four parts:

October 1: Cupules (their manufacture and meaning) with class demonstration
– Paleo-Indian rock art: what it means and where you find it
– Conventions and protocol for recording rock art

October 8: Archaic Rock Art
– The importance of shamanism and sacred shrines in the Archaic, the meaning of abstract art, and the Rowe Mesa rock art tour
– Early Archaic
– Middle Archaic
– Late Archaic and Transitional rock art

October 15: Ancestral Pueblo imagery: styles, meaning, and history

October 22: Historic Hispanic, Genízaro, and Catholic religious imagery
– Migratory Plains Indian rock art (Ute, Jicarilla Apache, and Comanche glyphs)
– Anglo-American images
– Where to find rock art in the greater Santa Fe area

Course Leader:

Richard I. Ford

Richard Ford, Arthur F. Thurnau Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, completed his BA in anthropology at Oberlin College and then his PhD in anthropology at the University of Michigan, where he rose to the rank of full professor of anthropology and botany. While at Michigan, he had administrative appointments as curator of ethnology and director of the Ethnobotanical Laboratory in the Museum of Anthropology, director of the Museum of Anthropology, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, and associate dean of research and computing in the Literary College.

Professor Ford’s ethnobotanical research took him to Poland, Tunisia, Kenya, Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, China, and several Midwestern and Southwestern states. Based on this travel, he published 135 articles and chapters and nine research monographs.

He received numerous awards from professional organizations including the Amal Amique Award in India, Distinguished Ethnobiologist from the Society of Ethnobiology, the Fryxell Award from the Society of American Archaeology, the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous local honors.

Now residing in Santa Fe, Ford is an active lecturer and archaeology tour guide. He also serves as an expert witness for several pueblos in their land and water cases.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 1, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 8, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 15, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $175 for members; $225 for non-members; $150 for members registered for the September 26, 2019, member field trip.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Photo:Shield figure with four pointed star, Mesa Prieta. Photo by Curt Schaafsma

Oct
15
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 15 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.


Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

Explore the history and evolution of rock art across the Rio Grande Basin with archaeologist, Richard Ford. This four-part course introduces participants to a wide range of rock art including Paleo-Indian, Early/Middle/Late Archaic, historic Pueblo, and the migratory Plains style. Learn how to identify rock art, record the works, and where to find nearby examples. This course is presented in four parts:

October 1: Cupules (their manufacture and meaning) with class demonstration
– Paleo-Indian rock art: what it means and where you find it
– Conventions and protocol for recording rock art

October 8: Archaic Rock Art
– The importance of shamanism and sacred shrines in the Archaic, the meaning of abstract art, and the Rowe Mesa rock art tour
– Early Archaic
– Middle Archaic
– Late Archaic and Transitional rock art

October 15: Ancestral Pueblo imagery: styles, meaning, and history

October 22: Historic Hispanic, Genízaro, and Catholic religious imagery
– Migratory Plains Indian rock art (Ute, Jicarilla Apache, and Comanche glyphs)
– Anglo-American images
– Where to find rock art in the greater Santa Fe area

Course Leader:

Richard I. Ford

Richard Ford, Arthur F. Thurnau Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, completed his BA in anthropology at Oberlin College and then his PhD in anthropology at the University of Michigan, where he rose to the rank of full professor of anthropology and botany. While at Michigan, he had administrative appointments as curator of ethnology and director of the Ethnobotanical Laboratory in the Museum of Anthropology, director of the Museum of Anthropology, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, and associate dean of research and computing in the Literary College.

Professor Ford’s ethnobotanical research took him to Poland, Tunisia, Kenya, Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, China, and several Midwestern and Southwestern states. Based on this travel, he published 135 articles and chapters and nine research monographs.

He received numerous awards from professional organizations including the Amal Amique Award in India, Distinguished Ethnobiologist from the Society of Ethnobiology, the Fryxell Award from the Society of American Archaeology, the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous local honors.

Now residing in Santa Fe, Ford is an active lecturer and archaeology tour guide. He also serves as an expert witness for several pueblos in their land and water cases.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 1, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 8, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 15, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $175 for members; $225 for non-members; $150 for members registered for the September 26, 2019, member field trip.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Photo:Shield figure with four pointed star, Mesa Prieta. Photo by Curt Schaafsma

Oct
22
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 22 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.


Rock Art of the Rio Grande Basin in Northern New Mexico

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

Explore the history and evolution of rock art across the Rio Grande Basin with archaeologist, Richard Ford. This four-part course introduces participants to a wide range of rock art including Paleo-Indian, Early/Middle/Late Archaic, historic Pueblo, and the migratory Plains style. Learn how to identify rock art, record the works, and where to find nearby examples. This course is presented in four parts:

October 1: Cupules (their manufacture and meaning) with class demonstration
– Paleo-Indian rock art: what it means and where you find it
– Conventions and protocol for recording rock art

October 8: Archaic Rock Art
– The importance of shamanism and sacred shrines in the Archaic, the meaning of abstract art, and the Rowe Mesa rock art tour
– Early Archaic
– Middle Archaic
– Late Archaic and Transitional rock art

October 15: Ancestral Pueblo imagery: styles, meaning, and history

October 22: Historic Hispanic, Genízaro, and Catholic religious imagery
– Migratory Plains Indian rock art (Ute, Jicarilla Apache, and Comanche glyphs)
– Anglo-American images
– Where to find rock art in the greater Santa Fe area

Course Leader:

Richard I. Ford

Richard Ford, Arthur F. Thurnau Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, completed his BA in anthropology at Oberlin College and then his PhD in anthropology at the University of Michigan, where he rose to the rank of full professor of anthropology and botany. While at Michigan, he had administrative appointments as curator of ethnology and director of the Ethnobotanical Laboratory in the Museum of Anthropology, director of the Museum of Anthropology, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, and associate dean of research and computing in the Literary College.

Professor Ford’s ethnobotanical research took him to Poland, Tunisia, Kenya, Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, China, and several Midwestern and Southwestern states. Based on this travel, he published 135 articles and chapters and nine research monographs.

He received numerous awards from professional organizations including the Amal Amique Award in India, Distinguished Ethnobiologist from the Society of Ethnobiology, the Fryxell Award from the Society of American Archaeology, the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous local honors.

Now residing in Santa Fe, Ford is an active lecturer and archaeology tour guide. He also serves as an expert witness for several pueblos in their land and water cases.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 1, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 8, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 15, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. – Noon, Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $175 for members; $225 for non-members; $150 for members registered for the September 26, 2019, member field trip.

This course is being offered in conjunction with an SAR member field trip: Archaic Rock Art on Rowe Mesa, Thursday September 26, 2019. Participation in the field trip is not required in order to take the course, but registered field trip attendees can receive an additional 15% discount on the course fee. For more information about the member field trip contact Amy Schiffer, schiffer@sarsf.org.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Photo:Shield figure with four pointed star, Mesa Prieta. Photo by Curt Schaafsma

Nov
5
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Nov 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.


An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

How are recent archaeological studies exploring Pre-Columbian Maya civilization shaping our current understanding of the culture and history? Join Dr. Jeremy Sabloff in a 4-part course exploring the evolution of the field of Maya studies. From new discoveries unlocked through Maya hieroglyphic texts to developments in understanding the settlement patterns of urban centers, Maya archaeology has shifted archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at all classes and populations, as well as continuities in cultural development over 2 millennia.

This course is presented in four parts:

November 5: An overview of the history of research on the Pre-Columbian Maya and the changing foci of scholars over the past century;

November 7: An exploration of the development of ancient Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, and the environment, both natural and cultural, within which it grew as well as a concentration on the Preclassic Period (from about 1,000 B.C. to A.D. 250) and the rise of complex societies in the Maya area and its first cities;

November 12: A look at the Classic (A.D. 250-800) and Terminal Classic (A.D. 800-1,000) Periods including the growth of Maya cities such as Tikal and Caracol, the great achievements in art and architecture, the decline of cities in the Southern Lowlands and the florescence in the north;

November 14: And, an exploration of the Postclassic Period (A.D. 1,000 to 1519) including the economic and political developments at cities such as Chichen Itza and Mayapan and the consequences of the 16th century Spanish Conquest.

Course Leader:

Jerry Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry Sabloff received his Ph.D. In anthropology from Harvard University and his B.A. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania and an External Professor Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute. He is an archaeologist with particular interest in the ancient Maya and has written or edited more than 20 books and monographs (including 4 SAR volumes).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, November 5, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday, November 7, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, November 12, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday November 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sabloff was recently interviewed about the importance of his work and shifts in the field by Knowable Magazine. Learn more and read the interview HERE.

Nov
7
Thu
2019
SAR In Depth: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Nov 7 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.


An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

How are recent archaeological studies exploring Pre-Columbian Maya civilization shaping our current understanding of the culture and history? Join Dr. Jeremy Sabloff in a 4-part course exploring the evolution of the field of Maya studies. From new discoveries unlocked through Maya hieroglyphic texts to developments in understanding the settlement patterns of urban centers, Maya archaeology has shifted archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at all classes and populations, as well as continuities in cultural development over 2 millennia.

This course is presented in four parts:

November 5: An overview of the history of research on the Pre-Columbian Maya and the changing foci of scholars over the past century;

November 7: An exploration of the development of ancient Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, and the environment, both natural and cultural, within which it grew as well as a concentration on the Preclassic Period (from about 1,000 B.C. to A.D. 250) and the rise of complex societies in the Maya area and its first cities;

November 12: A look at the Classic (A.D. 250-800) and Terminal Classic (A.D. 800-1,000) Periods including the growth of Maya cities such as Tikal and Caracol, the great achievements in art and architecture, the decline of cities in the Southern Lowlands and the florescence in the north;

November 14: And, an exploration of the Postclassic Period (A.D. 1,000 to 1519) including the economic and political developments at cities such as Chichen Itza and Mayapan and the consequences of the 16th century Spanish Conquest.

Course Leader:

Jerry Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry Sabloff received his Ph.D. In anthropology from Harvard University and his B.A. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania and an External Professor Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute. He is an archaeologist with particular interest in the ancient Maya and has written or edited more than 20 books and monographs (including 4 SAR volumes).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, November 5, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday, November 7, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, November 12, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday November 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sabloff was recently interviewed about the importance of his work and shifts in the field by Knowable Magazine. Learn more and read the interview HERE.

Nov
12
Tue
2019
SAR In Depth: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Nov 12 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.


An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

How are recent archaeological studies exploring Pre-Columbian Maya civilization shaping our current understanding of the culture and history? Join Dr. Jeremy Sabloff in a 4-part course exploring the evolution of the field of Maya studies. From new discoveries unlocked through Maya hieroglyphic texts to developments in understanding the settlement patterns of urban centers, Maya archaeology has shifted archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at all classes and populations, as well as continuities in cultural development over 2 millennia.

This course is presented in four parts:

November 5: An overview of the history of research on the Pre-Columbian Maya and the changing foci of scholars over the past century;

November 7: An exploration of the development of ancient Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, and the environment, both natural and cultural, within which it grew as well as a concentration on the Preclassic Period (from about 1,000 B.C. to A.D. 250) and the rise of complex societies in the Maya area and its first cities;

November 12: A look at the Classic (A.D. 250-800) and Terminal Classic (A.D. 800-1,000) Periods including the growth of Maya cities such as Tikal and Caracol, the great achievements in art and architecture, the decline of cities in the Southern Lowlands and the florescence in the north;

November 14: And, an exploration of the Postclassic Period (A.D. 1,000 to 1519) including the economic and political developments at cities such as Chichen Itza and Mayapan and the consequences of the 16th century Spanish Conquest.

Course Leader:

Jerry Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry Sabloff received his Ph.D. In anthropology from Harvard University and his B.A. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania and an External Professor Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute. He is an archaeologist with particular interest in the ancient Maya and has written or edited more than 20 books and monographs (including 4 SAR volumes).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, November 5, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday, November 7, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, November 12, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday November 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sabloff was recently interviewed about the importance of his work and shifts in the field by Knowable Magazine. Learn more and read the interview HERE.

Nov
14
Thu
2019
SAR In Depth: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Nov 14 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with rarely seen works in the IARC collection or take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.


An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Maya Civilization

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Course Description:

How are recent archaeological studies exploring Pre-Columbian Maya civilization shaping our current understanding of the culture and history? Join Dr. Jeremy Sabloff in a 4-part course exploring the evolution of the field of Maya studies. From new discoveries unlocked through Maya hieroglyphic texts to developments in understanding the settlement patterns of urban centers, Maya archaeology has shifted archaeological studies away from their concentration on the ruling elites to a broader, more realistic approach that looks at all classes and populations, as well as continuities in cultural development over 2 millennia.

This course is presented in four parts:

November 5: An overview of the history of research on the Pre-Columbian Maya and the changing foci of scholars over the past century;

November 7: An exploration of the development of ancient Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, and the environment, both natural and cultural, within which it grew as well as a concentration on the Preclassic Period (from about 1,000 B.C. to A.D. 250) and the rise of complex societies in the Maya area and its first cities;

November 12: A look at the Classic (A.D. 250-800) and Terminal Classic (A.D. 800-1,000) Periods including the growth of Maya cities such as Tikal and Caracol, the great achievements in art and architecture, the decline of cities in the Southern Lowlands and the florescence in the north;

November 14: And, an exploration of the Postclassic Period (A.D. 1,000 to 1519) including the economic and political developments at cities such as Chichen Itza and Mayapan and the consequences of the 16th century Spanish Conquest.

Course Leader:

Jerry Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry A. Sabloff

Jerry Sabloff received his Ph.D. In anthropology from Harvard University and his B.A. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania and an External Professor Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute. He is an archaeologist with particular interest in the ancient Maya and has written or edited more than 20 books and monographs (including 4 SAR volumes).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, November 5, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday, November 7, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, November 12, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Thursday November 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $200 for members; $250 for non-members

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sabloff was recently interviewed about the importance of his work and shifts in the field by Knowable Magazine. Learn more and read the interview HERE.

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