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Sep
5
Wed
2018
SAR In Depth: Beadwork Adorns the World @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Sep 5 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and view rarely seen items from the IARC collections. Each class offers a collaborative learning environment on SAR’s historic campus. Join us this fall for Beadwork Adorns the World.

Course Description:

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants. Where they start out is seldom where they end up. Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of peoples far distant. No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

In most parts of the world, beads are used at peak moments in life. With their luster and sparkle, used as an adornment, a surface additive, or an entire composition, they help to heighten the impact and meaning of these peak moments. These special times in the life of the community tend to revolve around life stages and passages, such as birth, becoming an adult, marriage, and death; power, position, or status in the community; or communication with the spirits.

This course begins with an in-depth view of the beadwork traditions of the Lakota people, or Western Sioux, of the central Plains. The remaining sessions will be spent working with collections and exhibits. Dr. Marsha Bol will lead a comprehensive tour of the Beadwork Adorns the World exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art. Participants will enjoy an in-depth look at the Indian Arts Research Center’s collection of Native American beadwork and an inside-look at the Native American beadwork in the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Course Leader:

Dr. Marsha Bol is the former director of the Museum of International Folk Art, the largest international folk art museum in the world, holding 135,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Before that, she served as the director of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe for seven years. Dr. Bol started her museum career at the University of New Mexico’s Maxwell Museum of Anthropology as the curator of education, while she was completing her PhD in Native American art history. While curator of anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in the 1990s, she planned the new Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians. She then joined the faculty of the University of Texas at San Antonio as an associate professor.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Wednesday, September 5, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, September 11, 3-5 p.m., Museum of International Folk Art
Tuesday, September 18, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday, September 25, 3-5 p.m., Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 

 

 

Museum of New Mexico Foundation members and Museum of International Folk Art docents receive a 10% discount on the non-member registration cost.

Register for Beadwork Adorns the World

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sep
11
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Beadwork Adorns the World @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Sep 11 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and view rarely seen items from the IARC collections. Each class offers a collaborative learning environment on SAR’s historic campus. Join us this fall for Beadwork Adorns the World.

Course Description:

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants. Where they start out is seldom where they end up. Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of peoples far distant. No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

In most parts of the world, beads are used at peak moments in life. With their luster and sparkle, used as an adornment, a surface additive, or an entire composition, they help to heighten the impact and meaning of these peak moments. These special times in the life of the community tend to revolve around life stages and passages, such as birth, becoming an adult, marriage, and death; power, position, or status in the community; or communication with the spirits.

This course begins with an in-depth view of the beadwork traditions of the Lakota people, or Western Sioux, of the central Plains. The remaining sessions will be spent working with collections and exhibits. Dr. Marsha Bol will lead a comprehensive tour of the Beadwork Adorns the World exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art. Participants will enjoy an in-depth look at the Indian Arts Research Center’s collection of Native American beadwork and an inside-look at the Native American beadwork in the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Course Leader:

Dr. Marsha Bol is the former director of the Museum of International Folk Art, the largest international folk art museum in the world, holding 135,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Before that, she served as the director of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe for seven years. Dr. Bol started her museum career at the University of New Mexico’s Maxwell Museum of Anthropology as the curator of education, while she was completing her PhD in Native American art history. While curator of anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in the 1990s, she planned the new Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians. She then joined the faculty of the University of Texas at San Antonio as an associate professor.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Wednesday, September 5, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, September 11, 3-5 p.m., Museum of International Folk Art
Tuesday, September 18, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday, September 25, 3-5 p.m., Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 

 

 

Museum of New Mexico Foundation members and Museum of International Folk Art docents receive a 10% discount on the non-member registration cost.

Register for Beadwork Adorns the World

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sep
18
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Beadwork Adorns the World @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Sep 18 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and view rarely seen items from the IARC collections. Each class offers a collaborative learning environment on SAR’s historic campus. Join us this fall for Beadwork Adorns the World.

Course Description:

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants. Where they start out is seldom where they end up. Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of peoples far distant. No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

In most parts of the world, beads are used at peak moments in life. With their luster and sparkle, used as an adornment, a surface additive, or an entire composition, they help to heighten the impact and meaning of these peak moments. These special times in the life of the community tend to revolve around life stages and passages, such as birth, becoming an adult, marriage, and death; power, position, or status in the community; or communication with the spirits.

This course begins with an in-depth view of the beadwork traditions of the Lakota people, or Western Sioux, of the central Plains. The remaining sessions will be spent working with collections and exhibits. Dr. Marsha Bol will lead a comprehensive tour of the Beadwork Adorns the World exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art. Participants will enjoy an in-depth look at the Indian Arts Research Center’s collection of Native American beadwork and an inside-look at the Native American beadwork in the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Course Leader:

Dr. Marsha Bol is the former director of the Museum of International Folk Art, the largest international folk art museum in the world, holding 135,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Before that, she served as the director of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe for seven years. Dr. Bol started her museum career at the University of New Mexico’s Maxwell Museum of Anthropology as the curator of education, while she was completing her PhD in Native American art history. While curator of anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in the 1990s, she planned the new Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians. She then joined the faculty of the University of Texas at San Antonio as an associate professor.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Wednesday, September 5, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, September 11, 3-5 p.m., Museum of International Folk Art
Tuesday, September 18, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday, September 25, 3-5 p.m., Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 

 

 

Museum of New Mexico Foundation members and Museum of International Folk Art docents receive a 10% discount on the non-member registration cost.

Register for Beadwork Adorns the World

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Sep
25
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Beadwork Adorns the World @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Sep 25 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and view rarely seen items from the IARC collections. Each class offers a collaborative learning environment on SAR’s historic campus. Join us this fall for Beadwork Adorns the World.

Course Description:

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants. Where they start out is seldom where they end up. Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of peoples far distant. No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

In most parts of the world, beads are used at peak moments in life. With their luster and sparkle, used as an adornment, a surface additive, or an entire composition, they help to heighten the impact and meaning of these peak moments. These special times in the life of the community tend to revolve around life stages and passages, such as birth, becoming an adult, marriage, and death; power, position, or status in the community; or communication with the spirits.

This course begins with an in-depth view of the beadwork traditions of the Lakota people, or Western Sioux, of the central Plains. The remaining sessions will be spent working with collections and exhibits. Dr. Marsha Bol will lead a comprehensive tour of the Beadwork Adorns the World exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art. Participants will enjoy an in-depth look at the Indian Arts Research Center’s collection of Native American beadwork and an inside-look at the Native American beadwork in the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Course Leader:

Dr. Marsha Bol is the former director of the Museum of International Folk Art, the largest international folk art museum in the world, holding 135,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Before that, she served as the director of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe for seven years. Dr. Bol started her museum career at the University of New Mexico’s Maxwell Museum of Anthropology as the curator of education, while she was completing her PhD in Native American art history. While curator of anthropology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in the 1990s, she planned the new Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians. She then joined the faculty of the University of Texas at San Antonio as an associate professor.

Dates, Times, and Places:

Wednesday, September 5, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, September 11, 3-5 p.m., Museum of International Folk Art
Tuesday, September 18, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom and Indian Arts Research Center
Tuesday, September 25, 3-5 p.m., Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 

 

 

Museum of New Mexico Foundation members and Museum of International Folk Art docents receive a 10% discount on the non-member registration cost.

Register for Beadwork Adorns the World

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Oct
2
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and offer a collaborative learning environment on the historic campus. Join us this fall for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology.

Course Description:

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Oct
9
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 9 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and offer a collaborative learning environment on the historic campus. Join us this fall for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology.

Course Description:

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Oct
16
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 16 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and offer a collaborative learning environment on the historic campus. Join us this fall for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology.

Course Description:

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.

Oct
23
Tue
2018
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Oct 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
SAR In Depth: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology @ Dobkin Boardroom, SAR

Open to both members and nonmembers, SAR In Depth courses are opportunities to engage with exciting scholars and offer a collaborative learning environment on the historic campus. Join us this fall for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology.

Course Description:

School of American Archaeology (what would eventually become the School for Advanced Research). Edgar Lee Hewett, an educator and emerging archaeologist at the time, became the school’s first director. He was instrumental in the development of the Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the Museum of New Mexico. He is often credited with shaping the burgeoning field of Southwestern archaeology in the early twentieth century. His long career reflected a larger-than-life persona, which contributes to the public attention he has received over the years. A less-explored subject is the coterie of ambitious young scholars and field workers who surrounded him. This course explores the lives of these influential scholars, their impact on the developing field of archaeology, and their changing views of the Southwest’s indigenous societies prior to contact with Europeans. With a particular focus on Sylvanus Morley, Jesse Nusbaum, and Kenneth Chapman, this course will also consider the work of John Fletcher, Frederick Hodge, A. V. Kidder, Ralph Emerson Twitchell, and John Harrington, among others.

Course Leader:

Jason S. Shapiro, PhD, was a long-time adjunct professor at the College of Santa Fe. An archaeologist, he has participated in a number of digs in New Mexico and Maryland. He is the author of A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico: Community Formation in the Northern Rio Grande (SAR Press) and Before Santa Fe: Archaeology of the City Different (Museum of New Mexico Press).

Dates, Times, and Places:

Tuesday, October 2, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 9, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday, October 16, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom
Tuesday October 23, 3-5 p.m., Dobkin Boardroom

Cost: $300 for members; $350 for non-members.

 Register for Edgar Lee Hewett and the Early Pioneers of Southwestern Archaeology

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

For more information about the class, contact Meredith Davidson davidson@sarsf.org or 505-954-7223.