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Sep
21
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Randy Chitto @ SAR's Instagram page
Sep 21 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

2006 Dubin Fellow, Randy Chitto

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with clay artist Randy Chitto (Mississippi band of Choctaw) will take place Monday, September 21 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2006 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow. Turtle storytellers are Chitto’s trademark, in which he blends stories from his Choctaw heritage with an art form known to the Southwest.

In his work, Randy tells stories of how the Choctaw were forced to relocate to a new geographical region. The medicine people instructed the elders to share their stories and wisdom with three chosen animals – the bear, the raccoon and the turtle. These wisdom keepers were instructed to protect the origin stories and preserve the spirit of the people through the ages lest they not be permitted return to the land of their ancestors.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on September 21 to watch and chat with Randy live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Register to receive a reminder for this event

 

Sep
22
Tue
2020
Online Salon: Voices of the Clay @ Hosted online. Register below.
Sep 22 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Online Salon: Voices of the Clay @ Hosted online. Register below.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Join Bruce Bernstein, Erik Fender, and Russell Sanchez for a conversation and home studio visits to learn about pottery making and pottery history. The three presenters have been working together for several years, researching and studying pottery and the village’s pottery families. Together, they have curated Voices of the Clay, an exhibit at Santa Fe’s Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC).

In the presentation, the three will share how the collections from the Indian Arts Research Center at SAR and the collections at MIAC provided valuable insights in their research. Bernstein will moderate the salon and virtual studio tour. Participants will learn about the history of San Ildefonso pottery as well as the materials and techniques used in the works of contemporary San Ildefonso potters. Included in the presentation will be a live pottery firing.   

About the Presenters:  

Bruce Bernstein, PhD, is the Director of Innovation & Senior Curator at the Coe Center, where he develops public programming, working directly with Indigenous artists and the permanent collection of traditional arts. His previous positions include Assistant Director for Collections and Research at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; Chief Curator and Director of Santa Fe’s Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and Laboratory of Anthropology; and Executive Director of the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. He has dedicated his three decades of work in museums to collaborative work and modeling new partnerships. 

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso Pueblo) is an award-winning artist who has been described as a master innovator in Pueblo pottery. Known for his hand-coiled, etched and inlaid creations, Sanchez crafts each piece using traditional Native American pottery methods.   

Sanchez was a recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in Art 2017. In 2019, he earned the “Best of Pottery” distinction at Santa Fe Indian Market. He is one of the co-curators of the MIAC exhibit, Voices of the Clay.  

Erik Fender (San Ildefonso Pueblo) is an established artist whose works of pottery, he explains are influenced by his mother, Martha Appleleaf, and his grandmother, legendary potter Carmelita Dunlap. Fender’s work ranges from traditional to contemporary. He has become recognizable for a style of green-on-black and green-on-red pieces. Fender has received first place awards at Santa Fe Indian Market among other awards. He is one of the co-curators of the MIAC exhibit, Voices of the Clay.  

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Sep
23
Wed
2020
Coming Together: Pueblo History in the Pojoaque Area @ Hosted online. Register below.
Sep 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

REGISTER HERE

Scott Ortman is Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and SAR’s 2020 Weatherhead fellow.

For the past six years, Ortman has had the honor to partner with the Pueblo of Pojoaque in a joint investigation of ancestral sites in the Pojoaque area. Through this partnership, Ortman learned important lessons regarding the potential of archaeology for tribal communities; how archaeologists and tribal members can work together as co-investigators; how such partnerships improve and decolonize archaeological practice; and how the incorporation of traditional knowledge leads to better archaeology in both its humanistic and social scientific dimensions. In the process, Ortman also had the opportunity to engage with Native philosophy and to understand the issues facing the Pojoaque and other Native communities today. In this talk, he explores a key tension emerging from these experiences and discusses some of its counter-intuitive implications for archaeological practice. He illustrates these points using results from work at K’uuyemugeh and other ancestral sites in the Pojoaque area.

This event is part of the 2020 fall scholar colloquia series.

Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Register for this talk here and see the full series here

Sep
28
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Jason Garcia @ SAR's Instagram page
Sep 28 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Jason Garcia. Photo by Dakota Mase, courtesy Jason Garcia

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with clay artist and printmaker Jason Garcia (Santa Clara Pueblo) will take place Monday, September 28 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2006 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow. Jason carefully examines and interprets life around him and then shares those uniquely personal observations with the rest of the world. In his finished work—most often clay tiles that are created in the traditional Pueblo way with hand-gathered clay, native clay slips and outdoor firings — he transforms materials closely connected to the earth into a visually rich mix of Pueblo history and culture, comic book super heroes, video game characters, religious icons and all things pop culture.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on September 28 to watch and chat with Jason live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Register to receive a reminder for this event

 

Jason Garcia. “Tewa Tales of Suspense #5 – Behold…Po’Pay”
Clay and mineral pigments. Photo courtesy of artist.

 

Oct
6
Tue
2020
SAR In-Depth – Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 6 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

Rush Book by Stephen Fried paperback jacket for SAR In-Depth Fall 2020 Course

Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush

Course Description:

This course takes you on a three-part journey from the earliest days of the American Revolution, through the war, the Constitution, and the first decades of governing the new nation all through the unique perspective of Dr. Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration, best friend of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, physician to the revolutionaries and their families, and recently rediscovered “lost” founding father.

Course Leader: Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author who teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Fried is the author of six nonfiction books including the biographies Appetite For America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West—One Meal at a Time and Thing Of Beauty: The Tragedy of Supermodel Gia; investigative books Bitter Pillsand The New Rabbi and the essay collection Husbandry. He is co-author with Patrick Kennedy of A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction. His latest book, Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, was a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize, and one of the American Library Association’s twelve notable nonfiction books of the year. A two-time winner of the National Magazine Award, he has been a staff writer for Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Philadelphia magazine. Mr. Fried and his wife, author Diane Ayres, live in Philadelphia, a few blocks from where Dr. Rush lived and the nation was born. Mr. Fried received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

This course will take place across three sessions: 

author and SAR In-Depth Course insructor Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried. Photo courtesy of Stephen Fried.

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Thursday, October 8, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Tuesday, October 13, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Cost: $150 for SAR members; $200 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place. 

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Oct
7
Wed
2020
Subsidized Labor: The Bracero Program in the Imperial Valley–Mexicali Borderlands, 1942–1969 @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

REGISTER HERE

Alina R. Méndez is Assistant Professor, American Ethnic Studies, University of Washington, and SAR’s 2020 Mellon fellow.  

The Bracero Program, a binational labor agreement between Mexico and the United States, placed approximately two million Mexican men (called braceros) in American farms between 1942 and 1964. In many agricultural regions across the West, braceros are now increasingly recognized as the Mexican “pioneers” of ethnic Mexican communities and celebrated for their contributions to local economies. One of these regions is California’s Imperial Valley, which borders the Mexican state of Baja California Norte. Arguing that “domestic” workers refused to labor in agriculture, Imperial Valley growers turned to braceros and their undocumented counterparts for cheap and flexible labor. If the labor of braceros and undocumented migrants came cheaply for Imperial Valley growers, however, this was largely because their communities subsidized the cost of such “cheap” labor. Méndez argues in her talk that the costs of maintaining a seasonal migrant labor force in the Imperial Valley remained hidden under the Bracero Program because braceros were employed in the United States during seasonal periods of labor need and expected to return to their families and communities in Mexico once they were no longer required in American fields.  

This event is part of the 2020 fall scholar colloquia series.

Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Register for this talk here and see the full series here

Oct
8
Thu
2020
SAR In-Depth – Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 8 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

Rush Book by Stephen Fried paperback jacket for SAR In-Depth Fall 2020 Course

Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush

Course Description:

This course takes you on a three-part journey from the earliest days of the American Revolution, through the war, the Constitution, and the first decades of governing the new nation all through the unique perspective of Dr. Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration, best friend of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, physician to the revolutionaries and their families, and recently rediscovered “lost” founding father.

Course Leader: Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author who teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Fried is the author of six nonfiction books including the biographies Appetite For America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West—One Meal at a Time and Thing Of Beauty: The Tragedy of Supermodel Gia; investigative books Bitter Pillsand The New Rabbi and the essay collection Husbandry. He is co-author with Patrick Kennedy of A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction. His latest book, Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, was a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize, and one of the American Library Association’s twelve notable nonfiction books of the year. A two-time winner of the National Magazine Award, he has been a staff writer for Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Philadelphia magazine. Mr. Fried and his wife, author Diane Ayres, live in Philadelphia, a few blocks from where Dr. Rush lived and the nation was born. Mr. Fried received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

This course will take place across three sessions: 

author and SAR In-Depth Course insructor Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried. Photo courtesy of Stephen Fried.

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Thursday, October 8, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Tuesday, October 13, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Cost: $150 for SAR members; $200 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place. 

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Oct
12
Mon
2020
President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour with Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo: Why has COVID-19 disproportionately affected Latino communities? @ Hosted online
Oct 12 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour

“Why has COVID-19 disproportionately affected Latino Communities” with Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

As members of the President’s Circle, Founders’ Society, and Legacy Circle, you are cordially invited to attend a Virtual Happy Hour with President Michael F. Brown and Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo for a conversation, “Why has COVID-19 disproportionately affected Latino communities?” Racial inequalities in the labor force, legal status and health care explain these outcomes. Focusing in particular on the long legacy of Mexican immigration, this session will discuss the occupational dangers that Latino immigrant workers face in the agricultural, domestic care, and restaurant sectors.

This event is free and open to members of the Board of Directors, Founders’ Society, and President’s Circle. Please RSVP to Amy Schiffer at schiffer@sarsf.org and she will send you the instructions to join via Zoom. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot today.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo was SAR’s 2017-2018 Weatherhead fellow. She is the Florence Everline Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Southern California. Her research examines how Latino immigrants negotiate challenges with informal sector work, varied legal status, and changing gender, family and community relations.  She has authored or edited nine books, and held research and writing fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation for the Humanities, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, UCSD’s Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, and the Getty Research Institute.  At USC, she enjoys helping undergraduate and graduate students construct their own research projects, and her teaching and mentorship have been recognized with the 2006 Mellon Excellence in Mentoring Award (for mentorship of graduate students), the 2000 General Education Teaching Award (for teaching freshmen students), and most recently with the 2015 Feminist Mentor Award from the Sociologists for Women in Society, in recognition of her mentorship of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.  In 2015, she received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association, International Migration Section, and in 2018 she received the Julian Samora Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association, Latina/o Sociology Section.

 

Oct
13
Tue
2020
SAR In-Depth – Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 13 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

Rush Book by Stephen Fried paperback jacket for SAR In-Depth Fall 2020 Course

Reliving the Revolution with Dr. Rush

Course Description:

This course takes you on a three-part journey from the earliest days of the American Revolution, through the war, the Constitution, and the first decades of governing the new nation all through the unique perspective of Dr. Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration, best friend of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, physician to the revolutionaries and their families, and recently rediscovered “lost” founding father.

Course Leader: Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author who teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Fried is the author of six nonfiction books including the biographies Appetite For America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West—One Meal at a Time and Thing Of Beauty: The Tragedy of Supermodel Gia; investigative books Bitter Pillsand The New Rabbi and the essay collection Husbandry. He is co-author with Patrick Kennedy of A Common Struggle: A Personal Journey Through the Past and Future of Mental Illness and Addiction. His latest book, Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, was a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize, and one of the American Library Association’s twelve notable nonfiction books of the year. A two-time winner of the National Magazine Award, he has been a staff writer for Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Philadelphia magazine. Mr. Fried and his wife, author Diane Ayres, live in Philadelphia, a few blocks from where Dr. Rush lived and the nation was born. Mr. Fried received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

This course will take place across three sessions: 

author and SAR In-Depth Course insructor Stephen Fried

Stephen Fried. Photo courtesy of Stephen Fried.

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Thursday, October 8, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Tuesday, October 13, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Cost: $150 for SAR members; $200 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place. 

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Oct
21
Wed
2020
Indians in Their Proper Place: Culture Areas, Linguistic Stocks, and the Genealogy of a Map @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 21 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

REGISTER HERE

Robert Caldwell is Assistant Professor, School of Arts and Sciences, SOWELA Technical Community College, and SAR’s 2020 Katrin H. Lamon fellow.

Maps of American Indian homelands, languages, and culture elements have profoundly shaped how scholars understand Indigenous peoples’ history. Because maps offer immediate pedagogical utility, they have been widely adopted in both popular and scholarly media.  

Initially dependent on Native informants, Indigenous knowledge was eventually generalized, schematized, and ultimately refracted back onto Indian Country. The end product was a result of the transcontinental circulation of ideas regarding natural science, philology, and the place of American Indians in the world. Scholars assigned languages, ascribed territories, and delineated political and cultural areas, creating maps that have been used as a tool to remove agency and to relegate Indigenous peoples and spaces to a primordial past.  

In this talk, Caldwell will discuss the two-hundred-year evolution of ethnological maps and offer a window into the world view of the mapmakers and their place within networks of power. 

This event is part of the 2020 fall scholar colloquia series.

Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Register for this talk here and see the full series here

Oct
27
Tue
2020
SAR In-Depth: Unearthing Violence: Archaeology in the Aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 27 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Unearthing Violence: Archaeology in the Aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre  

Course Description:

Black Wall Street mural in Tulsa Oklahoma

Black Wall Street mural in Tulsa Oklahoma. Photo courtesy of Alicia Odewale

Next year will mark 100 years since the 1921 attack on Greenwood destroyed what was commonly known as Black Wall Street, one of the most prosperous Black communities in the early twentieth century. In the wake of renewed public interest in this story from the HBO series Watchmen and a long awaited search for mass graves, the nation is fixated on unearthing evidence of trauma and violence done to this historic community. However, a new collaborative archaeology project titled “Mapping Historical Trauma in Tulsa from 1921 to 2021” remains focused on finding signs of life and recovery in the aftermath of the massacre, as the Greenwood community rebuilt their homes, businesses and churches. They continue to fight against erasure and gentrification in the present day.   

Today, most of the survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre are gone but generations of descendant families, social justice activists, educators, civil servants and archaeologists have banded together to unearth another side of the story of Greenwood after the massacre. Tulsa offers a unique case study in community archaeology and restorative justice since descendants and modern day residents within the Historic Greenwood District are seeking justice for themselves using archaeology in all its forms to reclaim the story of Black Wall Street and find their own lost heritage and people.

Course Leader: Alicia Odewale 

Alicia Odewale SAR In-Depth instructor

Alicia Odewale. Photo courtesy of Alicia Odewale.

Dr. Alicia Odewale is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa. She specializes in African Diaspora archaeology in the Caribbean and Southeastern United States. Since 2014 she has been researching archaeological sites related to Afro-Caribbean heritage on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands but continues to research sites of African heritage in Oklahoma, Virginia, Arkansas, and Mississippi. While she researches both urban and rural sites of enslavement in St. Croix, her latest project is based in Tulsa and seeks to reanalyze historical evidence from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The work includes launching new archaeological investigations in the historic Greenwood district, and using radical mapping techniques to visualize the impact of the massacre through time on the landscape of Greenwood, utilizing a slow community-based approach. She has received awards and support from the American Anthropological Association, the National Science Foundation, the Society of Historical Archaeology, the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, and the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (DAACS). In addition to her role as faculty, she also serves as the director of the Historical Archaeology and Heritage Studies Laboratory at TU and serves as the co-creator of the Estate Little Princess Archaeological Field School in St. Croix that trains local students in archaeological methods and other STEM related skills for free.

This course will take place across two sessions:

Tuesday, October 27, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time) Session 1: Restorative Justice and Community Led Archaeology

Thursday, October 29, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time) Session 2: Finding Signs of Life in the Aftermath of a Massacre

Cost: $100 for SAR members; $150 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place.  

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

Oct
29
Thu
2020
SAR In-Depth: Unearthing Violence: Archaeology in the Aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre @ Hosted online. Register below.
Oct 29 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Unearthing Violence: Archaeology in the Aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre  

Course Description:

Black Wall Street mural in Tulsa Oklahoma

Black Wall Street mural in Tulsa Oklahoma. Photo courtesy of Alicia Odewale

Next year will mark 100 years since the 1921 attack on Greenwood destroyed what was commonly known as Black Wall Street, one of the most prosperous Black communities in the early twentieth century. In the wake of renewed public interest in this story from the HBO series Watchmen and a long awaited search for mass graves, the nation is fixated on unearthing evidence of trauma and violence done to this historic community. However, a new collaborative archaeology project titled “Mapping Historical Trauma in Tulsa from 1921 to 2021” remains focused on finding signs of life and recovery in the aftermath of the massacre, as the Greenwood community rebuilt their homes, businesses and churches. They continue to fight against erasure and gentrification in the present day.   

Today, most of the survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre are gone but generations of descendant families, social justice activists, educators, civil servants and archaeologists have banded together to unearth another side of the story of Greenwood after the massacre. Tulsa offers a unique case study in community archaeology and restorative justice since descendants and modern day residents within the Historic Greenwood District are seeking justice for themselves using archaeology in all its forms to reclaim the story of Black Wall Street and find their own lost heritage and people.

Course Leader: Alicia Odewale 

Alicia Odewale SAR In-Depth instructor

Alicia Odewale. Photo courtesy of Alicia Odewale.

Dr. Alicia Odewale is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa. She specializes in African Diaspora archaeology in the Caribbean and Southeastern United States. Since 2014 she has been researching archaeological sites related to Afro-Caribbean heritage on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands but continues to research sites of African heritage in Oklahoma, Virginia, Arkansas, and Mississippi. While she researches both urban and rural sites of enslavement in St. Croix, her latest project is based in Tulsa and seeks to reanalyze historical evidence from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The work includes launching new archaeological investigations in the historic Greenwood district, and using radical mapping techniques to visualize the impact of the massacre through time on the landscape of Greenwood, utilizing a slow community-based approach. She has received awards and support from the American Anthropological Association, the National Science Foundation, the Society of Historical Archaeology, the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, and the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (DAACS). In addition to her role as faculty, she also serves as the director of the Historical Archaeology and Heritage Studies Laboratory at TU and serves as the co-creator of the Estate Little Princess Archaeological Field School in St. Croix that trains local students in archaeological methods and other STEM related skills for free.

This course will take place across two sessions:

Tuesday, October 27, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time) Session 1: Restorative Justice and Community Led Archaeology

Thursday, October 29, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time) Session 2: Finding Signs of Life in the Aftermath of a Massacre

Cost: $100 for SAR members; $150 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place.  

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

Nov
4
Wed
2020
Working Hands, Indebted Bodies: The Bioarchaeology of Labor and Inequality in an Era of Progress @ Hosted online. Register below.
Nov 4 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

REGISTER HERE

Alanna Warner-Smith is a PhD candidate in the department of Anthropology at Syracuse University and SAR’s 2020 Paloheimo fellow.  

In her talk, Warner-Smith will be discussing the ways in which “slow science” and “slow archaeology” might be applied to bioarchaeology by looking at the Huntington Anatomical Collection and specifically focusing on the collection’s Irish immigrants, who lived, worked, and died in New York City in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Taking the skeleton as a record of lived experience, life-course approaches interpret evidence of health and activity across individuals’ entire lives. A “slow” approach also draws together multiple lines of evidence—skeletal, archival, and material—to disentangle the processes shaping bodies and lived experiences. Warner-Smith’s presentation will examine the ways in which a “slow bioarchaeology” informs the categories we use, the questions we raise, and the phenomena that form the focus of our studies. 

This event is part of the 2020 fall scholar colloquia series.

Each year, incoming resident scholars introduce their work to the SAR community through a presentation and Q&A. This year’s talks are hosted online and continue to be free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Register for this talk here and see the full series here

Nov
9
Mon
2020
President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour with Scott Ortman: Painted Reflections: Isomeric Design in Ancestral Pueblo Pottery @ Hosted online
Nov 9 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour

“Painted Reflection: Isomeric Design in Ancestral Pueblo Pottery” with Scott Ortman

As members of the President’s Circle, Founders’ Society, and Legacy Circle, you are cordially invited to attend a Virtual Happy Hour with President Michael F. Brown and this year’s Weatherhead fellow Scott Ortman for a conversation, “Painted Reflection: Isomeric Design in Ancestral Pueblo Pottery.”

One of the most distinctive and yet least understood aspects of ancestral Pueblo pottery painting is the widespread use of figure-and-ground illusions—what Joseph Traugott and Scott Ortman have labeled isomeric design. During this happy hour, Ortman will summarize our book that explores the origins, production, and potential meanings of these fascinating patterns. Ortman will discuss various forms of isomeric design, illustrate how ancestral artists created them, and explore how they were connected to the development of Pueblo technology, philosophy and society.

This event is free and open to members of the President’s Circle, Founders’ Society, and Legacy Circle. Please RSVP to Amy Schiffer at schiffer@sarsf.org and she will send you the instructions to join via Zoom. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot today.

Scott Ortman - Courtesy of Scott Ortman

Scott Ortman – Courtesy of Scott Ortman

Scott Ortman is an associate professor at University of Colorado Boulder. His research focuses on historical anthropology, or the integration of theory and data from many fields to understand the long-term histories of indigenous peoples. He is especially interested in the causes and consequences of major transitions – periods when new societies formed, old ones collapsed, or new scales of organization emerged. As examples, he has investigated Tewa Pueblo origins in the Northern Rio Grande region of New Mexico; the growth and collapse of villages in the Mesa Verde region of Colorado; and more recently, the accumulation of social complexity on a global scale. He is currently working on the Neolithic Revolution in the U.S. Southwest in collaboration with Crow Canyon Archaeological Center and the CU Museum of Natural History, the emergence of towns in the Tewa Basin, and complex systems approaches to human societies in collaboration with the Santa Fe Institute.

Since 2003, he has been involved with the Village Ecodynamics Project, a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration that investigates long-term human-environment interactions in the U.S. Southwest. Prior to coming to CU, he was Director of Research at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado, and an Omidyar Postdoctoral Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute.

 

Nov
10
Tue
2020
SAR In-Depth: Topics in American Legal History: The Rule of Law @ Hosted online. Register below.
Nov 10 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The fall 2020 SAR In-Depth courses are all taught online so participants can join from anywhere. These courses offer one of the most unique ways to engage with leading scholars in a small group format. Explore the full fall line up here.

For the first time, SAR is also offering the option to register to receive the course recordings after the sessions are complete for people who are interested in the topics but who are unable to attend the online courses live.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Topics in American Legal History: The Rule of Law 

Course Description: 

This course will examine major themes in the history of American Law from the legacy of the Magna Carta to the most significant recent decisions of the Supreme Court. Topics will include establishing the rule of law in remote colonies, the law of slavery and the legal consequences of the Fugitive Slave Law, the role of contract law in creating a dynamic economy, the dispossession of Native Americans, crime and punishment, the internment of American citizens of Japanese descent, and the right to privacy. The goal of the course is to give an understanding of the history of law in America and its influence on society over time. Readings will consist of edited cases and decisions.

Michael Hindus. Photo courtesy of Michael Hindus.

Course Leader: Michael Stephen Hindus 

Michael Hindus earned his AB from Columbia, his Ph.D. in history from Berkeley, and his JD from Harvard Law School.  He is the author of two books and numerous articles in legal history.  He taught legal history at the University of Minnesota and Stanford Law School and currently teaches a seminar in legal history at Columbia.  As an attorney in private practice for nearly four decades, he was a partner in the San Francisco office of an international law firm where he specialized in renewable energy. 

This course will take place across four sessions:

Tuesday, November 10, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Thursday, November 12, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Thursday, November 19, 2020 // 10:00 a.m. (Mountain Time)

Cost: $200 for SAR members; $250 for non-members.

If you cannot take part in the live in-depth course, there is also a NEW option to register to receive the recorded course after the live sessions have taken place.  

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

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