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Jul
6
Mon
2020
President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour with Nancy Owen Lewis: New Mexico in the Time of Influenza @ Hosted online
Jul 6 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

President’s Circle Virtual Happy Hour

New Mexico in the Time of Influenza: A Conversation with Nancy Owen Lewis

As members of the President’s Circle and Founders’ Society, you are cordially invited to attend a Virtual Happy Hour with President Michael F. Brown and SAR Scholar-in-Residence Nancy Owen Lewis for a conversation, “New Mexico in the Time of Influenza.”

When the 1918 flu swept across the eastern seaboard, New Mexico denied that it could ever happen here.  It had built an entire industry based on a belief in the healing powers of its high and dry climate, which many believed conferred an immunity to tuberculosis and other maladies. With no public health department and a medical system focused on out-of-state health seekers, the state was unprepared when thousands became ill and deaths mounted.  Insights gleaned from the 1918 flu are examined in light of our current pandemic.

This event is free and open to members of the Board of Directors, Founders’ Society, and President’s Circle. Please RSVP to Lindsay Archuleta at archuleta@sarsf.org and she will send you the instructions to join via Zoom. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot today.

 

Nancy Oewn Lewis

Nancy Owen Lewis

Nancy Owen Lewis, SAR’s Scholar-in-Residence since 2011 and formerly SAR’s Director of Scholar Programs for 13 years, received her PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Massachusetts and subsequently taught anthropology at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, and the University of Arkansas. In 1994, she received the Outstanding Leadership in Health Promotion Award from the New Mexico Department of Health. Two years later she was awarded a Robert O. Anderson Fellowship from The Lovelace Institutes, which enabled her to publish the first known study of drive-up liquor windows. She has presented numerous papers on this topic and currently serves on the City of Santa Fe Public Safety Committee. She is a fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology and was named program chair for the 2017 SfAA Meeting in Santa Fe.

She recently completed a historical study of the impact of tuberculosis on New Mexico, which resulted in Chasing the Cure in New Mexico: Tuberculosis and the Quest for Health, published in 2016 by the Museum of New Mexico Press. She has also published five articles on this topic, including “High and Dry in New Mexico: Tuberculosis and the Politics of Health,” (New Mexico Historical Review 87, No. 2, spring 2012), which was named the winner of the 2013 Gilberto Espinosa Prize. Her other articles include “Chasing the Cure in New Mexico: The Lungers and their Legacy,” El Palacio 113 (4), winter 2008; “The Cure at the End of the Trail” In All Trails Lead to Santa Fe Anthology (Sunstone Press, 2010); “Washed Ashore at Fort Stanton: Healing Consumptive Sailors,” El Palacio, winter 2010; and “Adrift at Fort Stanton: Treating Consumptive Sailors,” in Sunshine and Shadows in New Mexico’s Past: The Statehood Era, 1912-2012, edited by Richard Melzer (Rio Grande Press, 2012). Another article, “Reviving the Santa Fe Fiesta: Edgar Lee Hewett and the Battle for Control,” was also published in that volume.

A Peculiar Alchemy

Other recent publications include A Peculiar Alchemy: A Centennial History of SAR, co-authored with Kay Hagan (SAR Press, 2007), which was named “Best Book in History” at the 2008 New Mexico Book Awards, and “Our Lady of Light: The Loretto Chapel,” Public Historian, Vol. 29 (4), Fall 2007. She has given numerous presentations on New Mexico history and serves as awards chair and second vice president of the Historical Society of New Mexico.

 

Jul
7
Tue
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Mikayla Patton @ SAR's Instagram page
Jul 7 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

2020 Dubin Fellow Mikayla Patton. Photo courtesy of the artist

Artist Live Transparent

SAR Artists Live with multimedia artist Mikayla Patton will take place Tuesday, July 7 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2020 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow and current artist in residence. Mikayla utilizes her passion and skills as both a papermaker and printmaker to collage Lakota line designs and symbols as a way to continue traditional art forms such as quillwork and beadwork.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on July 7  to watch and chat with Mikayla live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

 

Mikayla Patton. Annpa Kazanzan (Daylight Woman), 2019. Handmade paper, laser etching and cutting, sage, sinew. 12″ x 12″ x 24″

Jul
14
Tue
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Marla Allison @ SAR's Instagram page
Jul 14 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Marla Allison in the Dubin Studio.

2010 Dobkin Fellow Marla Allison in the Dubin Studio.

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with Laguna Pueblo painter Marla Allison will take place Tuesday, July 14 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2010 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native artist fellow. Although Marla’s work has been featured internationally and she has had residencies all over the world, Marla finds comfort in connecting with family, tradition, and the inspiration her community provides.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on July 14  to watch and chat with Marla live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Jul
17
Fri
2020
Beyond Borders: Hostile Terrain 94 Virtual Exhibit Opening @ Hosted online
Jul 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Beginning in the summer of 2020, the School of Advanced Research (SAR), in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe and Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe (CCA), presents Beyond Borders, a series of installations and events starting with Hostile Terrain 94, a participatory art project and exhibition intended to call attention to the realities of migration and border policy in our hemisphere.

To learn more about the full run of Beyond Borders programming, visit https://sarweb.org/beyond-borders-2020/


Beyond Borders makes its groundbreaking global debut on July 17, 2020, with a virtual opening of Hostile Terrain 94, a participatory art project and exhibition organized and sponsored by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), which is directed by anthropologist and former SAR resident scholar Jason De León. The opening will include an online introduction, virtual tour of the exhibition and discussion with De León the UMP team.

Registration is required.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Generous support for this program provided by:
Fund for Refugees & Asylum Seekers of the Santa Fe Community Foundation

Jul
18
Sat
2020
Beyond Borders – MacArthur Fellows in Conversation: Jason De León and Steven Feld @ Hosted online
Jul 18 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Beyond Borders - MacArthur Fellows in Conversation: Jason De León and Steven Feld @ Hosted online | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Beginning in the summer of 2020, the School of Advanced Research (SAR), in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe and Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe (CCA), presents Beyond Borders, a series of installations and events starting with Hostile Terrain 94, a participatory art project and exhibition intended to call attention to the realities of migration and border policy in our hemisphere.

To learn more about the full run of Beyond Borders programming, visit https://sarweb.org/beyond-borders-2020/


Following the launch of Hostile Terrain 94, join MacArthur Fellows Jason De León and Steven Feld as they explore how research and data can be translated creatively for public consumption through numerous forms of art and media, and be used to inspire individuals to take action in their own lives to contribute to the greater good.

Registration is required.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Funding for this event provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and Fund for Refugees & Asylum Seekers of the Santa Fe Community Foundation.

Speakers:

SAR 2013/2014 resident fellow, Jason De León / De León’s 2015 book, The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail (winner of the 2018 J.I. Staley Prize) chronicles the suffering and deaths of undocumented migrants who attempted to cross into the United States through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. His work combines ethnography, archaeology, linguistics, and forensic science and questions the effectiveness of the 1994 Prevention through Deterrence policies enacted by the U.S. government. Building on this work, De León created the traveling installation, Hostile Terrain 94.

SAR Senior Scholar, Steven Feld / Ethnomusicologist and Columbia University professor of anthropology, Steven Feld began working in Papua New Guinea’s Bosavi region in 1976 and has dedicated much of his career to documenting the sounds and cultural dynamics of the area. In 1991 he released an ambient soundscape album, Voices of the Rainforest (part of Mickey Hart’s Endangered Music Project). In 2018 released a full-length documentary by the same title that merged his audio archive with visuals from the rain forest and interviews with community members. Speaking about the project, Michael Stone notes, “The result is as close as we humans are likely to come in communicating with spirits gone but not departed, something that, despite the unimaginable cultural losses charged to the disingenuous promise of western “development,” Bosavi people, as cultural innovators in a wailing world, have long and tragically understood.”

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Jul
21
Tue
2020
POSTPONED to 2021: COLLECTIONS OF DISTINCTION at the home of Janis Lyon, in memory of Dennis Lyon @ at the home of Janis Lyon
Jul 21 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

COLLECTIONS OF DISTINCTION

Image above: Painting by Fritz Scholder, courtesy of Janis Lyon.

at the home of Janis Lyon, in memory of Dennis Lyon

Date: Postponed to 2021
Admission: $75 per person, includes drinks and hors d’oeuvres
$25 per person for President’s Circle members

Visit the Santa Fe home of Janis Lyon and the late Dennis (Denny) Lyon. Denny served on the SAR Board of Directors from 1996 to 2004 and had a passion for collecting in the Southwest. The Lyons have collected for many years, and their collection of pottery from New Mexico and Arizona includes pieces by Maria Martinez, Tony Da, and Nampeyo. The collection also includes New Mexican retablos, some of which are represented in the publication, A Century of Retablos: The Dennis & Janis Lyon Collection of New Mexican Santos, 1780–1880. Other works include early painters of the Taos Society of Artists, including Walter Ufer; paintings by Fritz Scholder and Paul Pletka; sculptures by Bob Haozous; pottery by Rick Dillingham; Spanish Colonial furniture; 19th to mid-20th-century Mexican ceramics; New Mexican early crosses; and more. The Lyons were mentored by Dr. Frank Harlow, a pioneering physicist from Los Alamos and authority on Pueblo pottery, as well as historian, art collector, and author Larry Frank.

Generously hosted by Janis Lyon.

Jul
28
Tue
2020
Online Salon with Frances Levine – “Shaping the American Frontier: Women of the Santa Fe Trail” @ Hosted online
Jul 28 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

“Shaping the American Frontier: Women of the Santa Fe Trail” with Dr. Frances Levine

Tuesday, July 28 | 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (MDT) 

The School for Advanced Research, in partnership with the Historic Santa Fe Foundation, is pleased to present as part of its Online Salon Series this lecture with Dr. Frances Levine, who will be exploring how women helped shape the American frontier by way of the Santa Fe Trail.

The Santa Fe Trail linked two frontiers—the far northern frontier of the newly formed Mexican nation with the westward expanding American nation. Because it was as much a road of military expansion as mercantile commerce, it is not often associated with stories of frontier women, but women of many cultures found their place on the trail alongside the men they were accompanying. The stories about the families in these frontier regions are fascinating, if seldom told in the usual canon of American history. In this Online Salon, Frances Levine examines the history of several women in particular from the Santa Fe Trail, including María Rosa Villalpando Sale dit Lajoie and María de la Cruz Carmen Benavides Robidoux, who along with others traveled between Missouri and Santa Fe between 1828 and the 1880s. There, from the beginning of the Santa Fe Trail, when the midcontinent was governed by French, Spanish and Americans, women contributed to the mixture of customs, traditions and laws that defined the expanding frontier.

Thomas Easterly Photo of St. Louis Levee, 1853

Thomas Easterly Photo of St. Louis Levee, 1853. Missouri Historical Society Collections, St. Louis.

Furniture, crates and barrels were loaded on steamboats on the St. Louis levee, ferried up the Mississippi River to the Missouri River, then transported over the Santa Fe Trail. The ties between St. Louis and Santa Fe were forged by commercial enterprises in both cities, military history and family relationships.

Emile Herzinger’s Drawing of  Helene LaJoie LeRoux, 1863, daughter of  Maria Rosa Villalpando Sale dit Lajoie. Missouri Historical Society Collections, St. Louis.

Emile Herzinger’s Drawing of  Helene LaJoie LeRoux, 1863, daughter of  Maria Rosa Villalpando Sale dit Lajoie. Missouri Historical Society Collections, St. Louis.

Maria Rosa was captured by Comanches in Taos in August 1760, and eventually brought to St. Louis in 1767 by one of St. Louis’s original settlers. Her family history illustrates the long and deep ties between New Mexico settlers and St. Louis, as well as the often tragic circumstances of women who were themselves trafficked in the fur trade.

This online event is free and open to the public.
We hope you will consider making a suggested donation at any level to help us continue to offer remote programs like this one. Register here.

Generous funding provided by the Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation.

 

Frances Levine

Frances Levine. Photo by Daniel Quay.

Dr. Frances Levine became the President and CEO of the Missouri Historical Society and Missouri History Museum in the spring of 2014.   She was previously the director of the New Mexico History Museum from 2002 until spring 2014.  Her museum positions have given her a unique perspective on the history of the American West, having seen it from both ends of the Santa Fe Trail.

A native of Connecticut, Frances received her B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University, Dallas.  She was the Division head for Arts and Sciences at Santa Fe Community College (in Santa Fe, New Mexico). She is a member of the American Alliance of Museums, the American Society for Ethnohistory, and the Santa Fe Trail Association. She has served as an evaluator for the American Alliance of Museums Accreditation review process for museums in the US and Mexico.

Dr. Levine is the author, co-editor or contributor to several award-winning books including Our Prayers Are in This Place: Pecos Pueblo Identity over the Centuries (1999, UNM Press), Through the Lens: Creating Santa Fe (2008 MNM Press, with MaryAnne Redding and Krista Elrick), and Telling New Mexico: A New History  (2009 MNM Press, with Marta Weigle and Louise Stiver) as well as a chapter in All Trails Lead to Santa Fe (2010 with Gerald Gonzalez, Sunstone Press), and the recently published Frontier Battles and Massacres: Historical and Archaeological Perspectives (with Ron Wetherington, editors). University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2014), and  Doña Teresa Aguilera y Roche Confronts the Spanish Inquisition: A New Mexican Drama (University of Oklahoma Press, 2016).

She has served as co-producer of several historic documentary films on New Mexico history with Michael Kamins, Executive Producer of the NM PBS Colores series.

This event is presented in partnership with:

Historic Santa Fe Foundation

SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Lomayumtewa K. Ishii @ SAR's Instagram page
Jul 28 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Lomayumtewa Ishii

Lomayumtewa Ishii

Artist Live Transparent

SAR Artists Live with multimedia artist Lomayumtewa K. Ishii will take place Monday, July 28 at 6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2016 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native artist fellow. Lomayumtewa K. Ishii is a Hopi painter. A member of the Rabbit-Tobacco clan, he comes from a traditional Hopi family and is inspired by the symbols and designs of the Hopi World.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on July 28 to watch and chat with Lomayumtewa live!

Aug
3
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Nanibaa Beck @ SAR's Instagram page
Aug 3 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Nanibaa Beck

Nanibaa Beck

SAR Artists Live with Navajo metalsmith Nanibaa Beck will take place Monday, August 3 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2018 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native artist fellow. In speaking about her work and what inspires her, she notes, “For some time now, I’ve been intrigued by the details of life as a Native metalsmith: how female metalsmiths’ hands look as they create, why they chose metalsmithing, how they feel they’ve grown, connecting to community, and how their studio life has evolved.”

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on August 3  to watch and chat with Nanibaa live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Aug
6
Thu
2020
Livestream Artist Talk with Mikayla Patton @ Hosted online at sarsf.info/youtube
Aug 6 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Oglala Lakota artist Mikayla Patton, is an early career artist who utilizes her passion and skills as both a papermaker and printmaker to collage Lakota line designs and symbols as a way to continue traditional art forms such as quillwork and beadwork.

While at SAR, Patton has been using papermaking and printmaking to explore the processes of bookmaking and small installation. Join us as she talks about her work and time as the 2020 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow.

Mikayla Patton. Annpa Kazanzan (Daylight Woman), 2019. Handmade paper, laser etching and cutting, sage, sinew. 12″ x 12″ x 24″

 

Aug
7
Fri
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Gerry Quotskuyva @ SAR's Instagram page
Aug 7 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Gerry Quotskuyva

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with Hopi katsina carver Gerry Quotskuyva will take place Friday, August 7 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2018 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native artist fellow. Gerry is a member of the Bear Strap Clan from the Second Mesa Village of Shungopavi. His remarkable style of carving has been nationally recognized on public television, and is represented in several museum collections.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on August 7  to watch and chat with Gerry live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Aug
10
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Dawn Dark Mountain @ SAR's Instagram page
Aug 10 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Dawn Dark Mountain

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with watercolor painter Dawn Dark Mountain will take place Monday, August 10 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2015 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native artist fellow. Dawn’s heritage is an integral part of her artwork. She uses controlled, intricate watercolors to create visual narratives of her Iroquois background. As a member of the Turtle Clan of the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois, she uses her watercolors and woodcuts to connect traditional and present day Woodland Indian ideas, philosophies, and stories.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on August 10  to watch and chat with Dawn live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Aug
17
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Mateo Romero @ SAR's Instagram page
Aug 17 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Mateo Romero, 2002 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with painter Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo) will take place Monday, August 17 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2002 Ronald and Susan Native artist fellow. Mateo graduated from Dartmouth College with a BA in painting and art history and an MFA from the University of New Mexico in printmaking. In speaking about his work, he notes, “These paintings reflect a pattern of evolution and change. The images are powerful, imposing, juxtaposed with swirling gestural paint marks and drips. Timeless, archaic elements of Pueblo culture are juxtaposed with contemporary abstract expressionist palette knife and brush work. Overall, the paintings develop a rhythmic, hypnotic, trancelike feeling which is referential to the metaphysical space of the Pueblo and the dance itself.”

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on August 17  to watch and chat with Mateo live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

Aug
21
Fri
2020
Beyond Borders Symposium @ Hosted online
Aug 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Beginning in the summer of 2020, the School of Advanced Research (SAR), in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe and Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe (CCA), presents Beyond Borders, a series of installations and events starting with Hostile Terrain 94, a participatory art project and exhibition intended to call attention to the realities of migration and border policy in our hemisphere.

To learn more about the full run of Beyond Borders programming, visit https://sarweb.org/beyond-borders-2020/


Led by Hostile Terrain 94 artist Jason De León, this symposium, designed to foster greater public dialogue about immigration, will bring De León together with leading anthropology and social sciences scholars C.J. Alvarez, Deborah A. Boehm, and Ieva Jusionyte, where they will share and discuss their own work with immigrant communities and their research on border issues and policies.

Generous support for this program provided by:
Fund for Refugees & Asylum Seekers of the Santa Fe Community Foundation
Louise Lamphere
Registration is required.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

Photo by Michael Wells.

Scholars:

SAR 2019/2020 Mellon fellow, C.J. Alvarez / Assistant professor in the department of Mexican American and Latino/a Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, CJ Alvarez is the 2019 Mellon fellow at SAR. He is the author of the 2019 Border Lands, Border Waters, a History of Construction on the US/Mexico Divide which explores the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region and how an examination of these efforts can re-frame our understanding of how the border has come to look and function as well as how these projects have shaped current debates on the future of the region. His current work, A history of the Chihuahuan desert, is an ethnographic exploration of the Chihuahuan desert bio-region and the lives of people who have lived in rural areas across the area which spans Southern New Mexico and Northern Mexico.

SAR 2013 Research Associate, Deborah A. Boehm / Professor of Anthropology and Gender, Race and Identity at the University of Nevada, Reno, Boehm was a research associate at SAR in 2013. She is the author of Returned: Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation (2016) and  co-editor of Illegal Encounters, The Effect of Detention and Deportation on Young People (2019). She is currently a fellow in residence with the California-based nonprofit, Freedom for Immigrants.

SAR 2013/2014 resident fellow, Jason De León / De León’s 2015 book, The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail (winner of the 2018 J.I. Staley Prize) chronicles the suffering and deaths of undocumented migrants who attempted to cross into the United States through the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. His work combines ethnography, archaeology, linguistics, and forensic science and questions the effectiveness of the 1994 Prevention through Deterrence policies enacted by the U.S. government. Building on this work, De León created the traveling installation, Hostile Terrain 94, as described above.

Ieva Jusionyte / Assistant professor of anthropology at Harvard University, Justionyte works with first responders at the US/Mexico border. Her ethnographic work examines where the lines between ethical and professional responsibilities come into conflict with legal circumstances when dealing with undocumented individuals. Her 2018 book, Threshold: Emergency Responders on the U.S.-Mexico Border, looks at the pressures experienced by first responders working under heightened security on both sides of the border. The book was selected as the winner of the 2016 Public Anthropology competition.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT HERE

 

Aug
24
Mon
2020
SAR Artists Live on Instagram with Adrian Wall @ SAR's Instagram page
Aug 24 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Adrian Wall

Adrian Wall, 2009 Rollin and Mary Ella King Fellow

Artist Live TransparentSAR Artists Live with sculptor Adrian Wall will take place Monday, August 24 at  6:00 p.m. MDT. Jump behind-the-scenes and into the workspace of SAR’s 2009 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native artist fellow. Adrian, a renowned sculptor from Jemez Pueblo, has been sculpting since his late teens. While his primary medium is stone, he also works with clay, glass, and bronze. Stylistically, he is well known for blending figurative detail with abstract forms.

Login to your Instagram account and go to SAR’s Instagram page at 6pm on August 24  to watch and chat with Adrian live! (https://www.instagram.com/schoolforadvancedresearch)

 

Eagle Spirit, 2007.

Eagle Spirit, 2007. Utah alabaster on walnut base, 28” x 10” x 8”. Courtesy of Adrian Wall.

 

 

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