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Apr
9
Thu
2020
JOIN VIA LIVESTREAM – Creative Thought Forum Lecture: What It Takes to Solve America’s IT Skills Gap @ YouTube Live
Apr 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Due to the New Mexico public health emergency status, this event will be livestreamed on SAR’s YouTube channel so that the SAR community can participate remotely. Simply head to sarsf.info/youtube at 6:30 p.m. (MST) on Thursday, April 9, to see the talk and participate in a Q&A after the presentation.

SAR’s third annual Creative Thought Forum series invites members and the public to explore our understanding of where humanity is going in a new age of technological and cultural shifts under the thematic umbrella of “The Future of Work,” through lectures and conversation-style salons.


Ankur Gopal is the founder of Interapt, an award-winning IT services firm that implements innovative technologies and develops IT workforce training. Interapt’s IT apprenticeship models are being implemented across the nation. Their team is now leading a ten-year plan to help Kentuckians build a sustainable technology ecosystem. His talk explores how families traditionally linked to coal-mining culture are grappling with the need for changing skills in the twenty-first century and the impact of economic inequality on access to training and education.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to this lecture and other benefits, click here.

SAR SALON // Friday, April 10, 2020 // Salons are offered on the morning following each Creative Thought Forum lecture. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker for a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco level members and above. For more information or to register for the salon call 505-954-7231.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

 

This lecture is sponsored by Descartes Labs, Dan Merians UBS Financial Services, and Shiprock Santa Fe

Apr
10
Fri
2020
CANCELED – Creative Thought Forum Salon: What It Takes to Solve America’s IT Skills Gap @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
Apr 10 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
CANCELED - Creative Thought Forum Salon: What It Takes to Solve America’s IT Skills Gap @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Due to current travel restrictions and the New Mexico public health emergency status, this event has been canceled.

The Friday following the lecture, SAR hosts an informal salon discussion with Ankur Gopal, the founder of Interapt, an award-winning IT services firm that implements innovative technologies and develops IT workforce training. The salon is an opportunity for a conversation-style gathering with the speaker and provides a deeper exploration of the lecture topics. Participants will be sent a brief selection of readings prior to the event so that they can familiarize themselves with the speaker’s work.

Participation in the salons is limited to 25 people and is a free member benefit; advanced registration is required with priority given to Chaco-level members and above. For more information or to RSVP for the salon call 505-954-7231 or email archuleta@sarsf.org.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive free admission to lectures and other benefits, click here.

Learn more about SAR’s Creative Thought Forum here.

CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR’s Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research
Apr 10 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR's Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Reservations for campus tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens of the School for Advanced Research. Originally the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White, the property was bequeathed to SAR in 1972. The 8-acre estate, formerly known as “El Delirio” (The Madness), is the campus for SAR, a research center for anthropology, archaeology, and other social sciences as well as the home to the Indian Arts Research Center.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes so you can fully appreciate the beauty of the campus and its graveled and flagstone walkways.

Tours may be subject to cancellation or rescheduling in case of inclement weather.

Wednesdays at 10 AM from June through September
Fridays at 10 AM year round
Cost $15, free to SAR members
Reservations required availability subject to change
Call (505) 954-7213

Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact the Reception Center at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

Download the SAR Walking History Tour Map (PDF, 2 MB).

CANCELED (through April 30) Tours of the Indian Arts Research Center @ Indian Arts Research Center
Apr 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) houses an outstanding collection of Native American art, including pottery, jewelry, textiles and clothing, paintings, basketry, and drums. With more than 12,000, items, the IARC is home to works that span from the sixth century to the present. Contemporary artists represented in the collection include Lucy Lewis (Acoma Pueblo), Pablita Velarde (Santa Clara Pueblo), Maria and Julian Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), Lonnie Vigil (Nambe Pueblo), and many others. Docent-led tours of the open-storage vaults give visitors an up-close and unique look into one of the world’s finest Native American art collections.

Cost: $15; Free to SAR members and Native Americans
Reservations required (availability subject to change)
Call (505) 954-7205

 

 


Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact IARC at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

School groups are eligible for a fee waiver. IARC staff will work with educators to develop a private visit tailored to your class. Please contact the IARC for details at 505.954.7205 or iarc@sarsf.org.

Native American groups are eligible for special programming. Click here to find out more.


Apr
17
Fri
2020
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR’s Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research
Apr 17 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR's Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Reservations for campus tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens of the School for Advanced Research. Originally the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White, the property was bequeathed to SAR in 1972. The 8-acre estate, formerly known as “El Delirio” (The Madness), is the campus for SAR, a research center for anthropology, archaeology, and other social sciences as well as the home to the Indian Arts Research Center.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes so you can fully appreciate the beauty of the campus and its graveled and flagstone walkways.

Tours may be subject to cancellation or rescheduling in case of inclement weather.

Wednesdays at 10 AM from June through September
Fridays at 10 AM year round
Cost $15, free to SAR members
Reservations required availability subject to change
Call (505) 954-7213

Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact the Reception Center at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

Download the SAR Walking History Tour Map (PDF, 2 MB).

CANCELED (through April 30) Tours of the Indian Arts Research Center @ Indian Arts Research Center
Apr 17 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) houses an outstanding collection of Native American art, including pottery, jewelry, textiles and clothing, paintings, basketry, and drums. With more than 12,000, items, the IARC is home to works that span from the sixth century to the present. Contemporary artists represented in the collection include Lucy Lewis (Acoma Pueblo), Pablita Velarde (Santa Clara Pueblo), Maria and Julian Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), Lonnie Vigil (Nambe Pueblo), and many others. Docent-led tours of the open-storage vaults give visitors an up-close and unique look into one of the world’s finest Native American art collections.

Cost: $15; Free to SAR members and Native Americans
Reservations required (availability subject to change)
Call (505) 954-7205

 

 


Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact IARC at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

School groups are eligible for a fee waiver. IARC staff will work with educators to develop a private visit tailored to your class. Please contact the IARC for details at 505.954.7205 or iarc@sarsf.org.

Native American groups are eligible for special programming. Click here to find out more.


Apr
22
Wed
2020
POSTPONED – Field Trip: Memories in the Landscape: Bluff and Cedar Mesas and Bears Ears National Monument @ Depart from SAR
Apr 22 – Apr 26 all-day

Memories in the Landscape: Bluff and Cedar Mesas and Bears Ears National Monument

Wednesday, April 22 – Sunday, April 26, 2020

Photo courtesy of Carol B. Patterson.

Cost per person:
Double Occupancy: $1,900 (Includes a $100 non-refundable tax-deductible donation to SAR)
Single Occupancy: $2,400 (Includes a $100 non-refundable tax-deductible donation to SAR)

Field trip limited to 15 participants.

To register, please click here.
Priority is given to Galisteo members and up.

Join the School for Advanced Research on a special trip to Bears Ears. This area in southeastern Utah contains thousands of sacred cultural sites and important areas of spiritual significance for many tribes. Ancestors of tribal groups gathered here for thousands of years leaving traces of their spiritual beliefs on rock surfaces. Many Native people continue to hunt, gather medicinal herbs, and conduct ceremonies in the Bears Ears as their ancestors have done for centuries. The sites are remote but not inaccessible. We will be joined by Christopher Lewis (Zuni) and Austin Qootsyamptewa (Hopi), who will talk about their origin myths and connections to this place. Our journey will be led by Dr. Carol Patterson, rock art expert on southwestern cultures. We will see a number of Basketmaker II through Pueblo III, Ute and Navajo, Zuni, Hopi, and Keresan rock art, as well as visits to the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum and Hovenweep and National Bridges National Monuments

Bears Ears National Monument is an area that has recently been reduced by 85% from its original designation as a protected park, and is on the Conservation Watch list, along with Notre-Dame in Paris. It is one of 20 endangered sites named to the 2020 Watch list of World Monuments.

There are thousands of petroglyph and pictograph panels on the walls of remote canyons. Some of these images are dated as far back as 12,000 BP, but most are around 700 years old. There are more than 10,000 archeological and cultural sites documented in the region. Today the surrounding area adjacent to the Bears Ears is occupied by the Dine’ (Navajo), and Ute Mountain Ute, who hold this land to be scared. In addition the Bears Ears is held sacred by the Hopi and Zuni tribes as well as by other tribal nations

We will stay in the new section of the Desert Rose Inn for the entire trip, so you can unpack your bags and relax. Meals will be in Bluff, except for two picnic lunches. We are driving in a comfortable bus with a microphone, and plenty of room for luggage. The weather should be mild.

Study Leader:

Photo courtesy of Carol B. Patterson.

Carol B. Patterson, PhD, a Colorado native, has a BA from the University of New Mexico, an MA from Columbia Pacific University, and her PhD in rock art from James Cook University, Australia. She was an adjunct professor of cultural anthropology at Metropolitan State College in Denver, and Colorado Mesa University at the Montrose and Grand Junction campuses. She was employed as a G11 field archaeologist at the Uncompahgre Field Office of the BLM in Colorado for 5 years. Her company of 15 years, Urraca Archaeological Services, specializes in rock art documentation and reevaluation projects. Carol has published several books and journal articles including On the Trail of Spider Woman, Ancient City Press, Santa Fe, 1997 and Petroglyphs of Western Colorado and the Northern Ute Indian Reservation as Interpreted by Clifford Duncan, American Philosophical Society Press, 2016, her most recent. Through her work in the Bears Ears National Monument, she has produced three articles on the Keres, Zuni and Hopi petroglyphs, in the international publication “Expressions” Vol. 22, 25, and 26.  She resides in Bluff, Utah.

Activity Level: Moderate. Lots of walking, with a few steeper inclines/declines.

Includes: Transportation in air-conditioned mini coach; water and snacks; room for 4 nights; guides, entry fees, and gratuities. Meals will be provided unless otherwise noted on the itinerary. Itinerary to be announced.

Apr
24
Fri
2020
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR’s Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research
Apr 24 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR's Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Reservations for campus tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens of the School for Advanced Research. Originally the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White, the property was bequeathed to SAR in 1972. The 8-acre estate, formerly known as “El Delirio” (The Madness), is the campus for SAR, a research center for anthropology, archaeology, and other social sciences as well as the home to the Indian Arts Research Center.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes so you can fully appreciate the beauty of the campus and its graveled and flagstone walkways.

Tours may be subject to cancellation or rescheduling in case of inclement weather.

Wednesdays at 10 AM from June through September
Fridays at 10 AM year round
Cost $15, free to SAR members
Reservations required availability subject to change
Call (505) 954-7213

Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact the Reception Center at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

Download the SAR Walking History Tour Map (PDF, 2 MB).

CANCELED (through April 30) Tours of the Indian Arts Research Center @ Indian Arts Research Center
Apr 24 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) houses an outstanding collection of Native American art, including pottery, jewelry, textiles and clothing, paintings, basketry, and drums. With more than 12,000, items, the IARC is home to works that span from the sixth century to the present. Contemporary artists represented in the collection include Lucy Lewis (Acoma Pueblo), Pablita Velarde (Santa Clara Pueblo), Maria and Julian Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), Lonnie Vigil (Nambe Pueblo), and many others. Docent-led tours of the open-storage vaults give visitors an up-close and unique look into one of the world’s finest Native American art collections.

Cost: $15; Free to SAR members and Native Americans
Reservations required (availability subject to change)
Call (505) 954-7205

 

 


Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact IARC at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

School groups are eligible for a fee waiver. IARC staff will work with educators to develop a private visit tailored to your class. Please contact the IARC for details at 505.954.7205 or iarc@sarsf.org.

Native American groups are eligible for special programming. Click here to find out more.


Apr
30
Thu
2020
POSTPONED – Latinos in the Crosshairs: The Construction of Latinos as a Threat in Political Rhetoric @ New Mexico History Museum Auditorium
Apr 30 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Due to current travel restrictions and the New Mexico public health emergency status, this event has been postponed.

We choose to use certain words. They are part of a political discourse, or a personal discourse, that reflects the way we think about the world as individuals and as a society. So, you can change those things, just by being conscious of what it is you are trying to accomplish in the world.” – Leo Chavez


Leo Chavez, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, presents “Latinos in the Crosshairs: The Construction of Latinos as a Threat in Political Rhetoric.” Chavez explores the historic use of political rhetoric targeting immigrant communities and the impacts these messages have on today’s Latino populations. He also shares insights from his most recent research project, developed in conjunction psychologist Belinda Campos, which examines the psychological health of people targeted in negative political messages. Working with 280 UCI students of Mexican descent, the study showed, for example, direct correlations between negative messages about immigrants with heightened perceptions of stress and lower perceived well-being.

Professor Chavez has been working on transnational migration since the 1980s. He is the author of Shadowed Lives: Undocumented Immigrants in American Society (1stedition 1992; 3rdEdition, Wadsworth/Cengage Learning 2013), Covering Immigration: Popular Images and the Politics of the Nation (University of California Press 2001), The Latino Threat: Constructing Immigrants, Citizens, and the Nation (Stanford University Press, 1stedition 2008; 2ndedition 2013) and Anchor Babies and the Challenge of Birthright Citizenship (Stanford University Press, 2017). His research often explores media representations with a focus on immigration.

Chavez received the Margaret Mead Award in 1993, the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists’ Book Award for The Latino Threat in 2009, the Society for the Anthropology of North America’s award for Distinguished Achievement in the Critical Study of North America in 2009, and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2017.

This lecture is supported by

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

May
1
Fri
2020
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR’s Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research
May 1 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR's Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Reservations for campus tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens of the School for Advanced Research. Originally the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White, the property was bequeathed to SAR in 1972. The 8-acre estate, formerly known as “El Delirio” (The Madness), is the campus for SAR, a research center for anthropology, archaeology, and other social sciences as well as the home to the Indian Arts Research Center.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes so you can fully appreciate the beauty of the campus and its graveled and flagstone walkways.

Tours may be subject to cancellation or rescheduling in case of inclement weather.

Wednesdays at 10 AM from June through September
Fridays at 10 AM year round
Cost $15, free to SAR members
Reservations required availability subject to change
Call (505) 954-7213

Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact the Reception Center at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

Download the SAR Walking History Tour Map (PDF, 2 MB).

CANCELED (through April 30) Tours of the Indian Arts Research Center @ Indian Arts Research Center
May 1 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) houses an outstanding collection of Native American art, including pottery, jewelry, textiles and clothing, paintings, basketry, and drums. With more than 12,000, items, the IARC is home to works that span from the sixth century to the present. Contemporary artists represented in the collection include Lucy Lewis (Acoma Pueblo), Pablita Velarde (Santa Clara Pueblo), Maria and Julian Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), Lonnie Vigil (Nambe Pueblo), and many others. Docent-led tours of the open-storage vaults give visitors an up-close and unique look into one of the world’s finest Native American art collections.

Cost: $15; Free to SAR members and Native Americans
Reservations required (availability subject to change)
Call (505) 954-7205

 

 


Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact IARC at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

School groups are eligible for a fee waiver. IARC staff will work with educators to develop a private visit tailored to your class. Please contact the IARC for details at 505.954.7205 or iarc@sarsf.org.

Native American groups are eligible for special programming. Click here to find out more.


May
5
Tue
2020
SAR In Depth: From Tsankawi to San Ildefonso; Pueblo Pottery at SAR and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture @ Eric S. Dobkin Boardroom, SAR
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The School for Advanced Research offers innovative and thought-provoking classes on a range of topics for SAR members and the general public. Courses often have opportunities to engage with scholarly experts and take advantage of the unique resources the campus provides.


From Tsankawi to San Ildefonso; Pueblo Pottery at SAR and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture


REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

Learn about San Ildefonso culture and ceramics with Bruce Bernstein, Director of Innovation & Senior Curator at the Coe Center, and award-winning potter, Erik Fender. Our course will explore this community of makers and their continued inspirations and contemporary challenges. Across two sessions participants will learn about the evolution of the region’s pottery through an in-depth look at pieces in the collections at SAR, and those exhibited as part of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s current exhibit, “Voices in Clay: San Ildefonso Pottery 1600 – 1930.”

This course will take place across two sessions:

Tuesday, May 5 – 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Tuesday, May 12 – 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Cost: $125 for members; $175 for non-members.

Course Leader:

Photo courtesy of Bruce Bernstein.

Bruce Bernstein, PhD, is the Director of Innovation & Senior Curator at the Coe Center, where he develops public programming, working directly with Indigenous artists and the permanent collection of traditional arts. His previous positions include Assistant Director for Collections and Research at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; Chief Curator and Director of Santa Fe’s Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and Laboratory of Anthropology; and Executive Director of the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. He has dedicated his three decades of work in museums to collaborative work and modeling new partnerships.

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE HERE

 

This course is presented in conjunction with a member trip: From the Source: Community Pottery, Creativity, and Production from Tsankawi to San Ildefonso (Friday, May 8). Please note, it is not required to attend the trip in order to participate in the course. If you are interested in registering for the trip, please see further information here.

If you would like to become an SAR member and receive a discount to attend this class and other benefits, click here.

May
8
Fri
2020
Field Trip: From the Source: Community Pottery, Creativity, and Production from Tsankawi to San Ildefonso @ Depart from SAR
May 8 @ 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

From the Source: Community Pottery, Creativity, and Production from Tsankawi to San Ildefonso

IAF 489. Jar, c. 1890. Yellow Deer (1847-1910).
San Ildefonso Pueblo.

Friday, May 8, 2020

Cost per person:
$250 (Includes a $25 non-refundable tax-deductible donation to SAR)

Field trip limited to 20 participants.

Click here to register.

Tsankawi is one of several large ancestral Tewa pueblo villages on the Pajarito Plateau that the ancestors of San Ildefonso Pueblo occupied before establishing their contemporary pueblo in the Northern Rio Grande Valley. The village continues to hold a special place in the histories, traditions, and futures of contemporary San Ildefonso People. Joseph “Woody” Aguilar, an enrolled member of San Ildefonso Pueblo and anthropologist, along with Bruce Bernstein, Director of Innovation & Senior Curator at the Coe Center, will provide unique insights into the multiple meanings and histories of Tsankawi and its ongoing relationship to the people of San Ildefonso Pueblo. We will also hike over to the Duchess Castle site, where Rose Dougan and Vera von Blumenthal worked with San Ildefonso potters as the first Pottery Improvement Project that would lead to the Indian Arts Fund and Indian Market.

San Ildefonso is world renowned for its pottery heritage creating more styles than other villages in northern New Mexico. After the hike at Tsankawi, we’ll head over to San Ildefonso for a pottery firing and lunch at the home of Russell Sanchez, an award-winning potter and one of the co-curators of “San Ildefonso Pottery: 1600 – 1930,” currently on exhibit at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) in Santa Fe. On the way back to Santa Fe, we’ll visit the Poeh Cultural Center for a tour of “Di Wae Powa” (“they came back”), exhibiting the story of bringing home 100 Tewa pots from the Smithsonian Institution. Erik Fender, also an award-winning potter from San Ildefonso, and the third co-curator of the San Ildefonso exhibit at MIAC, will join us and give his insights into the collection.

Photo courtesy of Bruce Bernstein.

Study Leaders:

Bruce Bernstein, PhD, is the Director of Innovation & Senior Curator at the Coe Center, where he develops public programming, working directly with Indigenous artists and the permanent collection of traditional arts. His previous positions include Assistant Director for Collections and Research at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; Chief Curator and Director of Santa Fe’s Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and Laboratory of Anthropology; and Executive Director of the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. He has dedicated his three decades of work in museums to collaborative work and modeling new partnerships.

Joseph Aguilar is an enrolled member of San Ildefonso Pueblo, and received his Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. His primary research focuses on the archaeology of the North American Southwest, with a specific interest in Spanish-Pueblo relations during the late 17th century, following the arrival of Spaniards into the Northern Rio Grande region. His general research interests include Indigenous Archaeology, landscape archaeology, and tribal historic preservation. He currently serves as on the Advisory Board of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office at San Ildefonso, and was recently in residence at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe as the 2014-15 Katrin H. Lamon Fellow.

Photo courtesy of SAR.

Activity Level: Moderate to Strenuous. The Tsankawi portion of the day includes hiking on uneven ground and climbing up and down ladders up to 15-feet tall.

Includes: Transportation in a air-conditioned coach; water and snacks; catered lunch; entry fees and gratuities.

In conjunction with this trip, Bruce and Eric will be teaching a two-part class (May 5 & 12) that takes a closer look at the San Ildefonso pieces in the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) collection as well as the exhibit at MIAC. The class registration is separate from the member trip and more information will be announced.

CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR’s Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research
May 8 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CANCELED (through April 30) Walking Tours of SAR's Historic Estate @ School for Advanced Research | Santa Fe | New Mexico | United States

Reservations for campus tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Explore the fascinating history, stunning architecture, and beautiful outdoor gardens of the School for Advanced Research. Originally the 1920s home of Amelia Elizabeth White and Martha Root White, the property was bequeathed to SAR in 1972. The 8-acre estate, formerly known as “El Delirio” (The Madness), is the campus for SAR, a research center for anthropology, archaeology, and other social sciences as well as the home to the Indian Arts Research Center.

Please wear comfortable walking shoes so you can fully appreciate the beauty of the campus and its graveled and flagstone walkways.

Tours may be subject to cancellation or rescheduling in case of inclement weather.

Wednesdays at 10 AM from June through September
Fridays at 10 AM year round
Cost $15, free to SAR members
Reservations required availability subject to change
Call (505) 954-7213

Private tours may be arranged for groups of eight people or more at a cost of $20 per person. Please contact the Reception Center at least two weeks in advance of your preferred tour date.

Download the SAR Walking History Tour Map (PDF, 2 MB).

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