Non-series (38)

Important books acquired outside of our regular series that present the best of anthropology, archaeology, history, and Native art.

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All That Glitters All That Glitters Duane Anderson; Foreword by Lonnie Vigil All That Glitters, the first comprehensive study of the micaceous pottery tradition in New Mexico, explores the current transition of micaceous pottery from a traditional culinary ware to an exciting contemporary art form. The illustrated catalog of the micaceous pottery collection at SAR's Indian Arts Research Center and a roster of micaceous potters practicing in northern New Mexico today further details the art form. 1999
The Anasazi in a Changing Environment, Book Cover The Anasazi in a Changing Environment

The contributors to this book seek to reconstruct the past environment of the North American Southwest using geological and botanical remains, particularly the evidence from tree rings. Archaeological predictions about the ways in which the Anasazi (ancestral Pueblo) would react under certain environmental and demographic conditions are matched over time against the reconstructed environment to provide an understanding of how human behavior is affected by the changing environment.

1988
Anthropology of War, Book Cover The Anthropology of War

This edited collection contains important new material on the origins and role of warfare in “tribal” societies. The chapters focus on a number of basic research issues, including war and social evolution, causes of war, ideology of war, and European transformation of indigenous warfare patterns.

1990
An Archaeology of Doings An Archaeology of Doings Severin M. Fowles In this probing study, Severin Fowles undertakes a sustained critique of religion as an analytical category in archaeological research. 2013
Art in Our Lives: Native Women Artists in Dialogue Art in Our Lives Edited by Cynthia Chavez Lamar and Sherry Farrell Racette with Lara Evans Art in Our Lives is the culmination of three seminars at SAR's Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) that brought together Native women artists to discuss the balancing of their art practice with their myriad roles, responsibilities, and commitments. 2010
At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds Gloria J. Emerson; Forward by N. Scott Momaday These poems, paintings, and personal reflections draw upon an ancient culture while crafting new visual and poetic "legends" to enrich our understanding of the significant places and stories that mark the traditional lands of the Navajo people. A book at once intimate, sweeping, and learned, At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds announces an important new Native American artistic voice. 2003
“C” 
The Chemistry of Prehistoric Human Bone The Chemistry of Prehistoric Human Bone

Bone chemistry is one of the most promising analytical methods now being used by archaeologists and physical anthropologists to investigate the past of the human species, and this state-of-the-art book includes many of the leading scientists in the field among its contributors.

1989
Chiefdoms Chiefdoms Edited by Timothy Earle The study of chiefdoms has moved from preoccupation with their formal characteristics to a concern with their dynamics as political institutions. The contributors to this volume are interested in how ruling elites retain power through control over production and exchange, and then legitimize that control through an elaborate ideology. 1991
Classic Maya Political History Classic Maya Political History Edited by T. Patrick Culbert  Ancient Maya civilization once flourished in the rainforests of what is today southern Mexico and Central America. It possessed the only full system of writing ever to be developed in the Americas. The pace of decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing has accelerated in the last few years, and half of the inscriptions from the sites of the Classic Period (AD 250–900) have now been read. Much of the newly available information consists of historical records of the careers of Maya rulers of the time. 1991
Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs. 1997
“E” 
El Delirio El Delirio Gregor Stark and E. Catherine Rayne Richly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs, El Delirio offers an appealing glimpse into a fascinating period of Santa Fe history. It is also a loving portrait of the remarkable, energetic, and strong-willed Elizabeth White, described by a friend as “one of the great women of the Southwest in a very small body.” 1998
The Emergence of Modern Humans, Book Cover The Emergence of Modern Humans

This volume is a collection of essays identifying the current issues regarding the origins and emergence of a “modern” human biological and behavioral pattern from the earlier patterns inferred for late archaic humans. They identify changing behavioral complexes in human life during the period between 120,000 and 20,000 years ago, and examine paleontological and archaeological approaches to such phenomena. 

1989
The Evolution of Political Systems, Book Cover The Evolution of Political Systems

Throughout the world, the development of agriculture produced dramatic changes in human cultural systems. As people settled down in one locality, populations grew rapidly, patterns of subsistence were transformed, technology became more advanced, and the nature of social and political relations changed. People no longer interacted exclusively with kin, as they had in the past when organized in bands, and new forms of political relationships between groups were established. The emergence of these political systems was the first step in the evolution of the state. 

1990
“F” 
For Indigenous Eyes Only For Indigenous Eyes Only Edited by Waziyatawin Angela Wilson and Michael Yellow Bird Recognizing an urgent need for Indigenous liberation strategies, Indigenous intellectuals met to create a book with hands-on suggestions and activities to enable Indigenous communities to decolonize themselves. The authors begin with the belief that Indigenous Peoples have the power, strength, and intelligence to develop culturally specific decolonization strategies for their own communities and thereby systematically pursue their own liberation. 2005
For Indigenous Minds Only For Indigenous Minds Only Edited by Waziyatawin and Michael Yellow Bird Included in this book are discussions of global collapse, what to consider in returning to a land-based existence, demilitarization for imperial purposes and re-militarization for Indigenous purposes, survival strategies for tribal prisoners, moving beyond the nation-state model, a land-based educational model, personal decolonization, decolonization strategies for youth in custody, and decolonizing gender roles. 2012
“G” 
Great Excavations Great Excavations Melinda Elliott The magnificent ruins of the prehistoric peoples of the American Southwest have always been a source of wonder and awe. But the stories of the men and women who devoted their lives to the discovery and study of these lost cultures and the places they called home have never before been adequately told. Now, in Great Excavations, journalist and researcher Melinda Elliott uncovers the crucial and exciting role played by the great archaeologists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in unearthing the Southwest’s prehistoric past. 1995
“H” 
A History of the Ancient Southwest A History of the Ancient Southwest Stephen H. Lekson According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. 2009
“I” 
Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage Joyce M. Szabo The study of what has become known as Plains Indian ledger art and of Fort Marion drawings in particular, has burgeoned in the last forty years. Joyce Szabo’s examination of the two drawing books by Zotom and Howling Wolf encompasses their origins and the issues surrounding their commission as well as what the images say about their creators and their collector. 2011
In the Places of the Spirits In the Places of the Spirits David Grant Noble; Foreword by N. Scott Momaday In the Places of the Spirits features seventy-six duotone plates of the land, people, and deep past of the Southwest, most published here for the first time, accompanied by personal reflections that reveal much about the artist and the magnificent land that inspires his artistry. 2010
Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest Susan Brown McGreevy; Foreword by Kevin Navasie Exploring the history and the current renaissance of basket making in the Native American Southwest, this lavishly illustrated volume features the work and words of the contemporary basket makers that participated in a Convocation at the School of American Research. The basket makers range in age from twenty-one to eighty-two and represent the Akimel O’odham, Apache, Hopi, Navajo, Pueblo, and Tohono O’odham tribes. 2001
Indian Painters of the Southwest Indian Painters of the Southwest Katherine L. Chase; Foreward by Diane Reyna The book profiles ten outstanding painters representing seven different Pueblo Indian groups and the Navajo Nation who participated in a convocation at the Indian Arts Research Center at the SAR. While some artists have chosen to depict traditional scenes and symbols and others have chosen to create modern works influenced by Euro-American painting, all draw on the “deep remembering” of tribal heritage and personal experience and a heightened awareness of the artist’s role in more than one modern world. 2002
Indian Policies in the Americas Indian Policies in the Americas William Y. Adams In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies. 2014
“M” 
Morleyana Morleyana

This collection of vignettes written by colleagues, friends, and family of Sylvanus Morley provides an intimate look at a man who devoted his life to the study and understanding of the ancient Maya.

1950
“N” 
Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 David M. Brugge Combining archeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, David M. Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest, the Catholic Church, to shed some light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation. 2010
“P” 
Painting the Underworld Sky Painting the Underworld Sky Mateo Romero, with a foreword by Suzan Shown Harjo Painter Mateo Romero uses a bold, muscular style and thick, expressive paint to expose the fault lines and tragedies afflicting Native people today. At the same time, he offers a meditation on the difficult yet artistically stimulating process of cultural diaspora and return in which he and many other Native artists are engaged. 2006
A Peculiar Alchemy A Peculiar Alchemy Nancy Owen Lewis and Kay Leigh Hagan; Preface by James F. Brooks In 2007, SAR celebrated its 100th anniversary. Established to promote the study of American antiquity, the School now supports wide-ranging programs dedicated to increasing our understanding of human culture and evolution through the arts, humanities, and social sciences. 2007
The People The People Text and photographs by Stephen Trimble Fifty Indian nations lie within the modern American Southwest, communities sustained through four centuries of European and American contact by their cultural traditions and ties to the land. In The People, Stephen Trimble provides an introduction to these Native peoples that is unrivaled in its scope and readability. 1993
Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa Edited by Peter R. Schmidt Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa features some of the foremost archaeologists from Africa and the United States and presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities. 2009
Pueblo Indian Painting Pueblo Indian Painting J. J. Brody A new tradition of Pueblo fine art painting arose in the first three decades of the twentieth century, born out of a dynamic encounter between the Pueblo and Euro-American communities in and around Santa Fe, New Mexico. 1997
“R” 
Regional Perspectives on the Olmec, Book Cover Regional Perspectives on the Olmec

The archaeological culture known as the Olmec has long been associated with the genesis of civilization in Mexico—the transition from simple, agricultural societies to near-urban states during the Mesoamerican Formative, which culminated in the empire of the Maya. 

1989
“S” 
The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented Sarah Bronwen Horton This book examines how Hispanos have re-created the modern Fiesta to stake their claims to Santa Fe, symbolically reoccupying this capital city and cultural homeland even as they have increasingly experienced displacement and dispossession. 2010
Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City Edited by David Grant Noble In 2010, Santa Fe officially turned 400—four centuries of a rich and contentious history of Indian, Spanish, and American interactions. 2008
Spanish-American Blanketry Spanish-American Blanketry H.P. Mera; with an introduction by Kate Peck Kent In 1984, while studying textiles in the collections of the School of American Research, Kate Peck Kent discovered a manuscript on Spanish-American weaving by the late H.P. Mera, curator of archaeology at Santa Fe's Lab of Anthropology. This forgotten manuscript describes the origin and history of the distinctive textiles woven by Spanish-Americans in New Mexico. 1987
Sustaining Thought Sustaining Thought Leslie Shipman with Rosemary Carstens Delicious meals served in the School for Advanced Research's famed Douglas W. Schwartz Seminar House fuel the critical and creative thinking that goes into many of our books. 2007
“T” 
Talking with the Clay, 20th Anniversary Revised Edition Talking with the Clay, 20th Anniversary Revised Edition Stephen Trimble When you hold a Pueblo pot in your hands, you feel a tactile connection through the clay to the potter and to centuries of tradition. You will find no better guide to this feeling than Talking with the Clay. 2007
Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective

The Islamic culture that developed in the ninth and tenth century in what is now Eastern Iran was to have a significant impact on most Muslims of west, south, and central Asia. Under the patronage of Persianized Turkic Muslim rulers, the culture spread westward to the Mediterranean and eastward to India. Especially in the early centuries of Islam, Turko-Persia represented a distinctive variant of Islamic life and thought in these regions, particularly among the elite. But after the fifteenth century regional variants started to emerge.

1991
“V” 
Villages of Hispanic New Mexico Villages of Hispanic New Mexico Text and photographs by Nancy Hunter Warren Nancy Hunter Warren trained her camera on scenes rarely witnessed by outsiders-a Penitente service, the blessing of a ditch, feast days, religious processions, the interiors of houses and village churches. 1987
“Y” 
Yazz: Navajo Painter Yazz Sallie R. Wagner, J. J. Brody, and Beatien Yazz Beatien Yazz’s life and work are examined by Sallie Wagner, long-time friend; J. J. Brody, director of the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico; and Beatien Yazz himself. 1983
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