History/Social Science (24)

 Scholarly works in history or the social sciences.

  Sort by:
Aboriginal Business Aboriginal Business Kimberly Christen From the vantage point of the remote Northern Territory town of Tennant Creek in Australia, this book examines the practical partnerships and awkward alliances that constitute Indigenous modernities. It is an ethnographic snapshot of the Warumungu people as they engage with a range of interlocutors, including transnational railroad companies, national mining groups, international tourists, and regional businesses. 2009
Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology. 2006
“B” 
Beyond Red Power Beyond Red Power Edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? 2007
“C” 
Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs. 1997
“E” 
El Delirio El Delirio Gregor Stark and E. Catherine Rayne Richly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs, El Delirio offers an appealing glimpse into a fascinating period of Santa Fe history. It is also a loving portrait of the remarkable, energetic, and strong-willed Elizabeth White, described by a friend as “one of the great women of the Southwest in a very small body.” 1998
“G” 
Great Excavations Great Excavations Melinda Elliott The magnificent ruins of the prehistoric peoples of the American Southwest have always been a source of wonder and awe. But the stories of the men and women who devoted their lives to the discovery and study of these lost cultures and the places they called home have never before been adequately told. Now, in Great Excavations, journalist and researcher Melinda Elliott uncovers the crucial and exciting role played by the great archaeologists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in unearthing the Southwest’s prehistoric past. 1995
“H” 
History in Person History in Person Edited by Dorothy Holland and Jean Lave Extended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today. 2001
A History of the Navajos A History of the Navajos Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey; with a New Preface by Garrick Bailey  A History of the Navajos examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation. In 1868, the year that the United States government released the Navajos from four years of imprisonment at Bosque Redondo and created the Navajo reservation, their very survival was in doubt. In spite of conflicts over land and administrative control, by the 1890s they had achieved a greater level of prosperity than at any previous time in their history. 1999
“I” 
Imperial Formations Imperial Formations Edited by Ann Stoler, Carole McGranahan, and Peter Perdue The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies. 2007
Indians & Energy Indians & Energy Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner The authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future. 2010
“K” 
Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe The Memoirs of Kenneth Chapman, Edited, annotated, and introduced by Marit K. Munson Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider's portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe. 2008
“L” 
Law & Empire in the Pacific Law & Empire in the Pacific Edited by Sally Engle Merry and Donald Brenneis Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty. Speaking to Fijian and Hawaiian circumstances, this volume illuminates the role of legal and archival practice in constructing ethnic and political identities and producing colonial and anthropological knowledge. 2004
“M” 
Making Alternative Histories Making Alternative Histories Edited by Peter R. Schmidt and Thomas C. Patterson After working in Third World contexts for more than a century, many archaeologists from the West have yet to hear and understand the voices of their colleagues in non-Western cultural settings. In Making Alternative Histories, eleven scholars from Africa, India, Latin America, North America, and Europe debate and discuss how to respond to the erasures of local histories by colonialism, neocolonial influences, and the practice of archaeology and history as we know them today in North America and much of the Western world. 1995
Memory, History, and Opposition Memory, History, and Opposition under State Socialism Edited by Rubie S. Watson Eight anthropologists, sociologists, and historians probe the oppositional narratives created by Chinese rural intellectuals, èmigrè Croats, and organized dissenters such as the Djilas of Yugoslavia who constructed and maintained oppositional histories in state socialist societies. 1994
Mimbres Lives and Landscapes Mimbres Lives and Landscapes Edited by Margaret C. Nelson and Michelle Hegmon The well-illustrated essays in this book offer the latest archaeological research on the ancient Mimbres to explain what we know and what questions still remain about men's and women's lives, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of the dramatic pottery designs. 2010
“N” 
Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 David M. Brugge Combining archeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, David M. Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest, the Catholic Church, to shed some light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation. 2010
“O” 
“Our Indian Princess” “Our Indian Princess” Nancy Marie Mithlo In this pathbreaking study, anthropologist Nancy Marie Mithlo examines the power of stereotypes, the utility of pan-Indianism, the significance of realist ideologies, and the employment of alterity in Native American arts. 2009
“P” 
A Peculiar Alchemy A Peculiar Alchemy Nancy Owen Lewis and Kay Leigh Hagan; Preface by James F. Brooks In 2007, SAR celebrated its 100th anniversary. Established to promote the study of American antiquity, the School now supports wide-ranging programs dedicated to increasing our understanding of human culture and evolution through the arts, humanities, and social sciences. 2007
Pluralizing Ethnography Pluralizing Ethnography Edited by John M.Watanabe and Edward F. Fischer This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala. 2004
“S” 
The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented Sarah Bronwen Horton This book examines how Hispanos have re-created the modern Fiesta to stake their claims to Santa Fe, symbolically reoccupying this capital city and cultural homeland even as they have increasingly experienced displacement and dispossession. 2010
Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City Santa Fe: History of an Ancient City Edited by David Grant Noble In 2010, Santa Fe officially turned 400—four centuries of a rich and contentious history of Indian, Spanish, and American interactions. 2008
Small Worlds Small Worlds Edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, & John Walton Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases. 2008
“W” 
The Work of Sovereignty The Work of Sovereignty David Kamper The Work of Sovereignty is a study of organizing campaigns and grassroots, ad hoc collective political actions carried out by employees trying to increase control over their workplaces and their say in the political life of their communities in Indian Country. By studying them, the author takes an on-the-ground approach to tribal labor relations that puts tribal workers at the center of the action. Attending to indigenous peoples as both economic and political members of their community in this way also sheds light on processes of indigenous self-determination that are not always as readily visible as those in courtrooms and tribal council chambers. 2010
“Y” 
Yanomami Warfare Yanomami Warfare R. Brian Ferguson Generations of college students know the Yanomami as the example of "natural" aggression in human society. These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present. 1995
Follow us: