News for Monday, April 17, 2017

SAR Announces 2017-2018 Native Artist Fellows

Loren Aragon. Loren Aragon. "Broken Ground 2017 Collection," 2016.Custom printed silk charmeuse, silk taffeta, silk organza, cotton sateen. Courtesy of the artist.Loren Aragon. "Broken Ground 2017 Collection," 2016.Custom printed silk charmeuse, silk taffeta, silk organza, cotton sateen. Courtesy of the artist.

The School for Advanced Research’s (SAR) Indian Arts Research Center offers three artist-in-residence fellowships annually to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists. The fellowships give artists time to explore new avenues of creativity, grapple with ideas to further advance their work, and to strengthen existing talents. While in residence, the artists can access the School’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) collection of Native arts for research and study. SAR is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 cycle of artists-in-residence.

2017 Ronald and Susan Dubin Fellow
Acoma Pueblo fashion designer and jeweler Loren Aragon is constantly pursuing culturally familiar elements to express his artistic vision. A mechanical engineer by trade, Aragon uses couture fashion to capture ideas predominantly influenced by the pottery culture and traditional dress of his community. During his time at SAR, he plans to research and employ new, perhaps less practiced methods and techniques in textile design, jewelry, and fashion design. Aragon plans to display his work in a capsule collection made up of four one-of-kind pieces highlighting textile design and ornamental metal work. Aragon will be in residence from June 15 - August 15, 2017.


Warren Montoya, Warren Montoya, "Hard Courage," 2013. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist. Warren Montoya, "Hard Courage," 2013. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist. 

2017 Rollin and Mary Ella King Fellow
Warren Montoya is a painter and sculptor from Santa Ana and Santa Clara Pueblos. Inspired by graphic art, surrealism, his peers, music, and his Pueblo heritage, Montoya formulates narratives and constructs imagery that reflects the practices and personalities of his relatives and their cultures. During his fellowship, Montoya plans to create an art installation made up of four large paintings and two sculptures. The paintings will represent various natural concepts such as the elements, directions and seasons. This full installation will speak to how our human existence is connected to and influenced by certain properties of this world, and by one another. Montoya will be in residence from September 1—December 1, 2017.


2018 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Fellow
Jordan Ann Craig, Jordan Ann Craig, "We Are Different," 2016.  Oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.Jordan Ann Craig, "We Are Different," 2016.  Oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.Painter, printmaker and designer, Jordan Craig (Northern Cheyenne) is an emerging artist at the nascence of her career. She draws inspiration from Aboriginal art, Indigenous textiles and pottery, and landscapes; telling stories about her childhood, family, trauma, and the appealingly mundane. Craig explains, “Using dots, peculiar geometries, cut paper, and pattern, I explore the feeling of forgetting how to sleep, the memory of building homes in trees, and the translation of language and dreams.” While at SAR, Craig will study the symbols and patterns utilized in the textiles, basket-weaving and pottery of the IARC collection and utilize these resources as inspiration for her work. Craig will be in residence from March 1 - May 31, 2018.

The Native artist fellowships support diverse creative disciplines. Recent fellows have included Brent Michael Davids (composer), Maile Andrade (multimedia), Duane Slick (painter), Will Wilson (photographer), Erica Lord (performance artist), Linda Aguilar (basketmaker), Kathleen Wall (sculptor), and Marla Allison (painter).

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