Lawrence Cohen

2008, March 9–13
Between Politics and Ethics: The Anthropology of Global HumanitarianismAdvanced SeminarBetween Politics and Ethics: The Anthropology of Global HumanitarianismFour themes guided this seminar—anthropology’s engagement with humanitarianism, religious and secular cosmologies, political limits, and stakes of intervention—with a special focus on the relationship between humanitarianism and war and the emotional and physical dimensions of humanitarianism.
2004
Anthropology in the Margins of the StateSAR Press PublicationAnthropology in the Margins of the StateThe very form and reach of the modern state are changing radically under the pressure of globalization. Featuring nine of the leading scholars in the field, this innovative exploration of these transformations develops an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: Africa, Latin America, and South Asia.
2003–2004
Weatherhead Resident Scholar‘Operability’: Sterilization and Transplantation as ‘Surgical Citizenship’ in India
2003
No Aging in India by Lawrence CohenJ. I. Staley PrizeNo Aging in India: Alzheimer's, the Bad Family, and Other Modern ThingsCohen studied geriatric and gerontological practice in the United States as a medical student before moving his research to India, where he found no diagnostic counterpart to the North American preoccupation with what has been labeled Alzheimer's disease.
2001, April 22–26
Advanced SeminarThe State at its Margins: Comparative Ethnographies of the Modern State in Africa, Latin America and South AsiaThis seminar was designed to develop an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where both state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: South Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Understanding how people perceive and experience the agency of the state was a central theme of the seminar. “A driving question for our sessions was—‘how is the state experienced on a daily basis?’” said Deborah Poole.


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