Jeffrey S. Dean

2012
Hisat'sinomSAR Press PublicationHisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without WaterThe national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma’s Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples “Hisat’sinom,” and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.
2006
The Archaeology of Chaco CanyonSAR Press PublicationThe Archaeology of Chaco Canyon: An Eleventh-Century Pueblo Regional CenterThe site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology.
1994
Themes in Southwest PrehistorySAR Press PublicationThemes in Southwest PrehistoryTwo dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population.
1988
The Anasazi in a Changing Environment, Book CoverSAR Press PublicationThe Anasazi in a Changing Environment

The contributors to this book seek to reconstruct the past environment of the North American Southwest using geological and botanical remains, particularly the evidence from tree rings. Archaeological predictions about the ways in which the Anasazi (ancestral Pueblo) would react under certain environmental and demographic conditions are matched over time against the reconstructed environment to provide an understanding of how human behavior is affected by the changing environment.

1983
The Past Climate of Arroyo Hondo New Mexico Reconstructed from Tree RingsSAR Press PublicationThe Past Climate of Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, Reconstructed from Tree RingsThis landmark study uses archaeological tree-ring chronologies in the first attempt to quantitatively reconstruct past climate variability. After a step-by-step explanation of the statistical methods the authors reconstruct in inches the annual and spring precipitation of the Arroyo Hondo area for each year from AD 985 to 1970. This is the fourth volume in the series.
1970
Reconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo SocietiesSAR Press PublicationReconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo Societies

The chapters in this book focus on methods and theories used to systematically test hypotheses about prehistoric social organization. The concern with social organization reflects a larger trend in archaeology that stresses the recovery and use of pertinent data for testing ideas and assumptions.



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