Seminars

Advanced Seminars

Katherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance: Theory, Experiment and Social EngagementKatherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance: Theory, Experiment and Social EngagementKatherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance: Theory, Experiment and Social Engagement

While resident scholar fellowships give individuals the rare opportunity to write in extended, unstructured solitude, the School’s Advanced Seminar Program creates a unique intellectual crucible in which groups of scholars can explore dynamic themes and issues at the forefront of anthropological inquiry. An optimal seminar format consisting of ten scholars in residence for a week emerged out of the program’s first years of experimentation. Throughout the week, participants eat, sleep, and meet in the Schwartz Seminar House, where they engage in structured discussions centered on precirculated papers as well as in informal brainstorming sessions. This deceptively simple format fosters ground-breaking insights into fundamental questions and encourages scholars with differing perspectives to examine cross-cutting themes.

Since the program began in 1967, the School has hosted 131 Advanced Seminars, encompassing 1,360 scholars. Two-thirds of the seminars have resulted in published volumes that allow individual papers and the results of the vigorous seminar discussions to be shared with the academic community and the general public.

Short Seminars

IARC Seminar: Essential AestheticsIARC Seminar: Essential AestheticsIARC Seminar: Essential Aesthetics

The Short Seminar Program brings together scholars for intense gatherings that differ from the lengthier advanced seminars in their experimentation and spontaneity. With a two- to three-day time frame and no set structure, the Short Seminar Program—which includes gatherings for research teams, artists, museum professionals, and applied anthropologists—encourages scholars to experiment with creative formats for intellectual dialogue.

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