News for Monday, March 15, 2010

Stockman Family Foundation Provides Grant for Conserving Native American Paintings

Shoshone Hide Painting by Cadzi CodyShoshone Hide Painting by Cadzi CodyThis Shoshone hide painting was made ca. 1890 and is attributed to Cadzi Cody (1866–1912, also known as Katsikodi and Cotsiogo). It is part of IARC's permanent collection. Shoshone Hide Painting by Cadzi CodyThis Shoshone hide painting was made ca. 1890 and is attributed to Cadzi Cody (1866–1912, also known as Katsikodi and Cotsiogo). It is part of IARC's permanent collection. 

The Stockman Family Foundation has awarded SAR with a grant to aid in the conservation of several large Native American paintings that are part of the Indian Arts Research Center Center collection. 

This generous grant will fund conservation work on five paintings, all of which were part of the original estate bequeathed to the School in 1973, whose owners, Martha and Amelia Elizabeth White, were directly engaged in SAR’s early history as well as dedicated patrons of Native American art. The paintings range from the oldest, a Shoshone hide painting made ca. 1890 and attributed to Cadzi Cody, to early 20th-century canvases painted by San Ildefonso Pueblo artists Awah Tsireh and Oqwa Pi. 

The IARC permanent collection of Southwest Native American paintings consists of more than 1,300 works spanning the careers of hundreds of artists. The collection covers the entire early history of Southwest Indian painting, from the self-taught Pueblo painters at the turn of the century to the artists trained at the Santa Fe Indian School Studio under Dorothy Dunn beginning in the 1930s. The collection, among one of the earliest formed, is the largest and most comprehensive of its kind, and includes paintings by virtually all significant Southwest artists from the late 19th century through today.

SAR extends its sincere gratitude to the Stockman Family Foundation for making this important conservation work possible.

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