Artist Fellowships and Residencies: Who, What, When, Where, Why?

Jennifer Complo McNutt, Elysia Poon, Reuben Tomás Roqueñi, and John Torres-Nez

IARC Speaker Series, SAR Boardroom

Thursday, March 15, 2012, 3:00–5:00 pm, Free


Listen to the event “Artist Fellowships and Residencies.”

This panel discussion focuses on artist fellowships and residencies, why they are important, what opportunities are available, and what is expected when applying. Representatives from granting institutions will be on hand to speak about their programs and answer any questions. Speakers include John Torres-Nez (Southwest Association for Indian Arts), Jennifer Complo McNutt (Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art), Reuben Tomás Roqueñi (Native Arts and Cultures Foundation), and Elysia Poon (Indian Arts Research Center, School for Advanced Research). This panel is generously supported by the Anne Ray Charitable Trust and the Institute of American Indian Art.

Jennifer Complo McNutt has been with the Eiteljorg Museum since 1991, two years after it opened. She started as an education assistant and eventually became curator of contemporary art. Prior to joining the Eiteljorg, McNutt worked with the Indiana Arts Commission and as an assistant art professor at DePauw University in Greencastle. McNutt has a BA in painting and drawing from Indiana University and an MA in painting from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University.

Elysia Poon has been the program coordinator at the School for Advanced Research’s Indian Arts Research Center since 2007, where her responsibilities include IARC public programming; education; and overseeing the Native artist, intern, and volunteer programs. Prior to coming to SAR, Ms. Poon worked for the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture in Santa Fe, and the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. She has her BA in Art History and Criticism from the University of California San Diego and MA in Art History from the University of New Mexico.

Panelists Discuss Their Respective Artist ProgramsPanelists Discuss Their Respective Artist ProgramsIARC Speaker Series panel discussion with (from left to right) Elysia Poon, Jennifer Complo McNutt, Reuben Tomás Roqueñi, and John Torres-Nez. Moderated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar. Photograph by Jennifer McCarty.Panelists Discuss Their Respective Artist ProgramsIARC Speaker Series panel discussion with (from left to right) Elysia Poon, Jennifer Complo McNutt, Reuben Tomás Roqueñi, and John Torres-Nez. Moderated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar. Photograph by Jennifer McCarty.

Reuben Tomás Roqueñi is the program director for the Native Arts & Cultures Foundation. Prior to working at the NACF, he was grants manager for the Tucson Pima Arts Council. Roqueñi has served on the board of directors for Access Tucson (public television) and was a founding board member of the Tucson Musicians and Artists Health Alliance (TAMHA). He is a graduate of the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture (NALAC) Leadership Institute and was one of eight selected for the NALAC Advocacy Institute in DC. He has served on review panels for the National Endowment for the Arts, NALAC Fund for the Arts, Arizona Commission on the Arts, Regional Arts and Culture Council (Portland, OR), Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, and Pro Neighborhoods Tucson. Roqueñi received his BFA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, and is a multi-media visual artist.

John Torres-Nez has helped move the field of archaeology away from mere "things" and towards a focus on the people of the past as one of a small handful of Native archaeologists. For fifteen years, he worked in the cultural resource world for dozens of western tribes, but the longest was with his own tribe, the Navajo Nation. His journey brought him to Santa Fe in 2000, where as a curator at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, he became active in the world of Native art and began volunteering at the Southwest Association for Indian Arts. Today, he is SWAIA’s director of artistic services. He also serves on the Navajo Studies board of directors and is a bead worker, flintknapper, and jeweler.

Download Native artist resources (PDF, 48 KB).

Sponsored by Anne Ray Charitable Trust

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