El Morro and Zuni Pueblo

Field Trip

Friday, October 20–Saturday, October 21, 2017, (includes $50 tax-deductible donation to SAR) $575 person, double occupancy; $635 per person, single occupancy

El Morro BluffEl Morro BluffEl Morro Bluff

To register for this field trip, click here.
Limited to 22 people.

Study Leaders: Timothy D. Maxwell, PhD, director emeritus, Museums of New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies; Jim Enote, Zuni tribal member, director of the Colorado Plateau Foundation and director of the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center; and Kenny Bowekaty, archaeologist and Zuni tribal member.

El Morro (“the Heartland”), which rises 200 feet above the valley floor, is a mixture of both human and natural history. Ancestral Puebloans lived on top of the massive bluff long before Europeans arrived in the “New World” and carved petroglyphs into the soft walls. Beginning in the late 1500s, Spaniards, and later Americans, passed by and carved their names, dates, and messages into walls of the massive bluff. Today, El Morro National Monument protects over 2,000 inscriptions and petroglyphs, as well as Ancestral Puebloan ruins. Ironically, the softness of the sandstone that made it easy to carve inscriptions is also the reason that they are slowly disappearing. Guided by Dr. Timothy Maxwell, we will visit the inscriptions and, if possible, the pueblo ruins.

El Morro, PetroglyphsEl Morro, PetroglyphsBeginning in the late 1500s, Spaniards, and later Americans, passed by and carved their names, dates, and messages into the walls at El Morro.El Morro, PetroglyphsBeginning in the late 1500s, Spaniards, and later Americans, passed by and carved their names, dates, and messages into the walls at El Morro.

A short drive will take us to Zuni Pueblo, where we will spend the late afternoon on artist visits with emphasis on Zuni’s unique fetish carving and the inlay silverwork. We’ll then head to our hotel and on to dinner, returning to Zuni Pueblo early the next morning to the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, where Jim Enote will lead a tour of the exhibits that span Zuni history. The A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center is a tribal museum and heritage center for the Zuni people and by the Zuni people.

Visiting Zuni.Visiting Zuni.Kenny Bowekaty leading a trip to Hawikkuh.Visiting Zuni.Kenny Bowekaty leading a trip to Hawikkuh.

We will then be joined by Kenny Bowekaty who will lead us a short distance away to the Middle Village for a walking tour through the cultural heart of the Zuni people, where most cultural observances occur. After lunch at a home nearby, we’ll drive a short distance to Hawikkuh, where Kenny will lead us on a tour of the first place of documented history of the Southwest and one of the fabled “Cities of Gold,” where the ancestors of today’s Zunis had lived since 1200 AD.

Activity Level: Easy to moderate

Includes: Lunch (Friday and Saturday), dinner Friday (any alcohol will be on your own); hotel accommodations including breakfast Saturday, transportation, guides, entry fees, gratuities, and water on the bus. Photography permits will be available at Zuni and are not included in the cost of the trip.


Photo credits: El Morro images courtesy of the National Park Service, Zuni images courtesy of Zuni Tourism.

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