Seminars

2013

Indian Affairs Under Self-Determination: Views from Behind the ScenesJanuary 8–10, 2013Indian Affairs Under Self-Determination: Views from Behind the ScenesCo-chaired by Katheleen Guzman, Associate Dean for Academics, College of Law, University of Oklahoma and Kristin Ruppel, Associate Professor, Native American Studies, Montana State UniversityThis seminar was convened to reveal what American Indian “self-determination” looks like from the perspective of those actually involved in its implementation. This was not so much a “bottom-up” perspective as it was a look at what has happened behind the scenes, among Indian accountants, probate judges, land appraisers, realty experts, Indian landowner advocates, and attorneys from across the country.
Intangible Cultural Heritage Policies and Practices for Safeguarding Traditional Cultures: Comparing China and the United StatesApril 9–12, 2013Intangible Cultural Heritage Policies and Practices for Safeguarding Traditional Cultures: Comparing China and the United StatesCo-chaired by Robert Baron, Director, Folk Arts Program and Music, New York State Council on the Arts and Nicholas Spitzer, Professor of American Studies and Anthropology, Tulane UniversityThis short seminar compared program and policy approaches to intangible cultural heritage in the Peoples’ Republic of China and American folklore and art in national, state/provincial, and local contexts among ethnic and occupational communities.
Literary AnthropologyApril 21–25, 2013Literary AnthropologyCo-chaired by Stuart McLean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and Global Studies, University of Minnesota and Anand Pandian, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins UniversityThis advanced seminar examined the place of literary craft in contemporary anthropology, focusing attention on forms of transformative encounter provoked by the reading and writing of anthropological literature. The seminar was intended both as a forum for conceptual discussion and as an intensive workshop for the collaborative development of innovative forms of anthropological prose.
21st-Century Hunting and Gathering: Foraging on a Transitional LandscapeMay 5–9, 201321st-Century Hunting and Gathering: Foraging on a Transitional LandscapeCo-chaired by Brian F. Codding, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah and Karen L. Kramer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of UtahToday's foraging populations live on a transitional landscape, encountering and adapting to external impacts caused by local and global neighbors. This seminar explored answers to the question: Given all of the economic alternatives available to individuals in the 21st century, why do people around the world maintain hunting and gathering life-ways?
San Felipe Pottery SeminarMay 17, 2013San Felipe Potters Seminar IVOn May 17, 2013, the seven San Felipe potters convened once again at IARC. They reviewed draft content for the online exhibit, reviewed their biographies, and discussed other outcomes of the seminar series. These outcomes include a special event scheduled during Indian Market week at the La Fonda on August 15, 2013 where the potters will hold a special showing of their work and the online exhibit will be featured. In addition, their discussions included the possibility of having a special event at San Felipe Pueblo to highlight pottery making at the Pueblo.
Comparative Borderlands in Anthropology and HistoryJune 7–8, 2013Comparative Borderlands in Anthropology and HistoryCo-chaired by James F. Brooks, President and CEO, School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, NM; Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara; and Stuart Smith, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa BarbaraThis innovative partnership involved collaboration between the Anthropology and History departments at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and SAR. Over the course of the 2012-13 academic year, five doctoral students from anthropology and five from history worked closely with the department chairs, archaeologist Stuart Smith and historian Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, and SAR president James F. Brooks, to develop in-depth research papers in particular areas of borderland studies.
Changing the Atmosphere: Anthropological Engagement with Climate ChangeOctober 8–10, 2013Changing the Atmosphere: Anthropological Engagement with Climate ChangeCo-chaired by Shirley J. Fiske, Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland; Lisa J. Lucero, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign ; and Anthony Oliver-Smith, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of FloridaThis SAR short seminar examined the commonalities and schisms that permeate anthropological approaches to climate change, and looked to the future to configure mutual frontiers of research and engagement.
The Multi-Sited History of the Anthropology of KoreaNovember 5–7, 2013The Multi-Sited History of the Anthropology of KoreaChaired by Robert Oppenheim, Associate Professor, Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas–AustinThe majority of research on past anthropologies of Korea has focused on Japanese anthropologists during and immediately before the Japanese colonial era. This seminar expanded discussion to focus more specifically on the “multi-sitedness” of Korea as an anthropological object.
Conservation Seminar INovember 11–13, 2013Conservation Seminar IFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar and Landis SmithFor the first time, leading conservators of indigenous collections from museums across the US, Canada, and New Zealand gathered at the Indian Arts Research Center on Nov. 11–13, 2013, to address timely and critical issues in the field of conservation and collections stewardship with other museum professionals, including tribal museum directors, curators, artists, and collections managers.
Faith-based Charity and the Security StateDecember 8–12, 2013Faith-Based Charity and the Security State: Containing People and Finance in Risk SocietiesChaired by Erica Caple James, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyThis advanced seminar explored how faith-based humanitarian activities challenge notions of secularism, as well as conceptions of risk and security, in cross-cultural contexts.
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