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Beyond Red Power

2007. Edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler

How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? Within this one story of indigenous persistence are many stories of local, regional, national, and international activism that require a nuanced understanding of what it means to be an activist or to act in politically purposeful ways.

Biology, Brains, & Behavior

2000. Edited by Sue Taylor Parker, Jonas Langer, and Michael L. McKinney

An exciting new cross-disciplinary field of biocultural research is emerging at the start of the twenty-first century: developmental evolutionary biology. Looking at the behavioral ontogeny of primates, the authors-leading scholars of biological anthropology, evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, and cognitive neuroscience-pose questions that probe our fundamental understanding of the human species.

Big Histories, Human Lives

2013. Edited by John Robb and Timothy R. Pauketat

The contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories. Did history unfold in different ways for different people? What are the central historical processes behind such unfoldings? How are we to understand these events and their relevance to us today?

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death

2012. Edited by Aubrey Baadsgaard, Alexis T. Boutin, and Jane E. Buikstra

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains. These new trajectories challenge old stereotypes, redefine the way research of human remains should be accomplished, and erase the divide that once separated osteologists from archaeologists.

Cash on the Table

2014. Edited by Edward F. Fischer

Anthropologists have historically tended to focus on the corrosive effects of markets on traditional lifeways and the ways in which global markets disadvantage marginalized peoples. Economists often have difficulty recognizing that markets are embedded in particular social and political power structures and that “free” market transactions are often less free than we might think. If anthropologists could view markets a bit more ecumenically and if economists could view them a bit more politically, then great value—cash on the table—could be found in bringing these perspectives together.

A Catalyst for Ideas

2005. Edited by Vernon L. Scarborough

In his thirty-four years as president of the School of American Research, Douglas W. Schwartz’s far-reaching vision placed SAR on the intellectual edge of research about humans across the globe. The twelve essays in this volume celebrate his contributions by looking back at changes in the field and forward to vital questions, methods, and theories yet nascent.

Catastrophe & Culture

2002. Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith

Using a variety of natural and technological disasters-including Mexican earthquakes, drought in the Andes and in Africa, the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Oakland firestorm, and the Bhopal gas disaster-the authors of this volume explore the potentials of disaster for ecological, political-economic, and cultural approaches to anthropology along with the perspectives of archaeology and history.

Chaco & Hohokam

1991. Edited by Patricia L. Crown and W. James Judge

Synthesizing data and current thought about the regional systems of the Chacoans and the Hohokam, eleven archaeologists examine settlement patterns, subsistence economy, social organization, and trade, shedding new light on two of the most sophisticated cultures of the prehistoric Southwest.

The Chaco Experience

2008. Ruth Van Dyke

The Chacoan landscape, with its formally constructed, carefully situated architectural features, is charged with symbolism. In this volume, Ruth Van Dyke analyzes the meanings and experience of moving through this landscape to illuminate Chacoan beliefs and social relationships.