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Guidelines for Collaboration: IARC Leads National Trend in Collaborative Museum Work

Guidelines for Collaboration: IARC Leads National Trend in Collaborative Museum Work

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to announce the publication of the Guidelines for Collaboration, theoretical and practical guides to building successful collaborations between Indigenous communities, museums, and other collecting institutions. The Guidelines are the product of several years of critical discourse between over sixty Native and non-Native museum professionals, cultural leaders, artists, and scholars experienced in collaborative work in various institutions in the United States, Canada, and New Zealand. Available only in limited release until now, the Guidelines are already being used by internationally recognized institutions including Chicago’s Field Museum and University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA) in collaboration with the Getty Conservation Institute.

White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

White Paper “Aging in Place: Challenges and Prospects”

“Aging in place” is a common phrase meaning that older people prefer to age (most frequently through the end of their lives) in their homes, in spaces that represent their lives, and ideally close to family and friends. This white paper is the result of a salon held at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) that took place on June 6, 2019, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which was generously sponsored by the Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Foundation.

Elysia Poon named Indian Arts Research Center Director

Elysia Poon named Indian Arts Research Center Director

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to announce the appointment of Elysia Poon as the new director of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC). With over a decade of experience within the organization as the IARC curator of education and nearly twenty years of museum experience, Poon has demonstrated a commitment to collaborative programming and a dedication to community-based collections care. Under her leadership, the IARC will continue to advance national conversations around how collecting institutions and Native American communities can work together to foster cultural heritage and promote contemporary art practices.

Understanding the U.S. Immigration Detention System – An Anthropologist’s Perspective

Understanding the U.S. Immigration Detention System – An Anthropologist’s Perspective

After Deborah Boehm finished her book Returned: Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation, which she partially wrote as an SAR Research Associate in 2013, she knew she needed to do more. During her research, she had formed deep relationships with immigrant families impacted by deportation. “Many of those I had interviewed had been also been detained, and their stories were so harrowing,” she says. “Their lives had been unraveled by state action.”

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

2019-2020 Creative Thought Forum Series Addresses the Future of Work

The School for Advanced Research is pleased to announce the third annual Creative Thought Forum series. Across lectures and conversation-style salons, SAR and community partners invite our members and the public to explore our understanding of where humanity is going in a new age of technological and cultural shifts under the thematic umbrella of “The Future of Work.”

John Nieto-Phillips and Thomas R. Conner Join SAR Board of Directors

John Nieto-Phillips and Thomas R. Conner Join SAR Board of Directors

The School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is pleased to welcome two new members to its board of directors: John Nieto-Phillips, Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Professor of History and Latino Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and Thomas R. Conner, former trial attorney and founder of TIRR Foundation/Mission Connect, a nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of those living with paralysis or traumatic brain injuries.

Redefining Ancient Maya Culture Through the Study of the 99 Percent

Redefining Ancient Maya Culture Through the Study of the 99 Percent

SAR board member and eminent archaeologist, Jerry Sabloff has devoted considerable effort to the study of settlement patterns in Mexico and Central America—the when, where and how non-elite Maya people lived and worked. Sabloff discusses his discoveries in a Q&A interview in the 2019 issue of Knowable Magazine and presents on the topic in this fall’s SAR In-Depth course.

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