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Members Matter. Meet Maria.

Members Matter. Meet Maria.

One of our newest members, Maria, found SAR serendipitously this last year. Stuck at home in Missouri, Maria had been searching for online opportunities to fill the social and intellectual void created by the pandemic-related restrictions. As she told SAR recently, she has always had an interest in the history and culture of New Mexico, specifically Puebloan history and pottery. After discovering one of SAR’s online artist talks, she started exploring our recorded programs on YouTube and signing up for upcoming virtual events to feed her hungry mind.

2021 J. I. Staley Prize Awarded to Laurence Ralph for Renegade Dreams, Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago

2021 J. I. Staley Prize Awarded to Laurence Ralph for Renegade Dreams, Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago

The School for Advanced Research is pleased to announce that the 2021 J. I. Staley Prize will go to Laurence Ralph, professor of anthropology at Princeton University and director of the Center on Transnational Policing, for his 2014 book, Renegade Dreams: Living through Injury in Gangland Chicago (University of Chicago Press).

SAR Learns! $50,000 Awarded to Support Indigenous Artists

SAR Learns! $50,000 Awarded to Support Indigenous Artists

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to announce our new initiative, SAR Learns! Out of a desire to support intergenerational learning and creativity during the pandemic, SAR Learns! will assist with knowledge transmission specifically within the context of the ongoing pandemic. The program will distribute $50,000, utilizing re-directed grant funds, that will enable sixteen artists to launch or complete a variety of proposed projects. 

SAR Remembers Marshall David Sahlins

SAR Remembers Marshall David Sahlins

The School for Advanced Research(SAR) mourns the passing of Marshall David Sahlins: a preeminent anthropologist and SAR supporter whose academic work repeatedly transformed anthropology, and whose activism informed the public. Read two personal reflections by Michael F. Brown (SAR President) and Paul Ryer (Director, SAR Scholar Programs) who like so many leading anthropologists today studied at some point with professor Sahlins.

Living Nations, Living Words, SAR Welcomes Joy Harjo

Living Nations, Living Words, SAR Welcomes Joy Harjo

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to present a virtual program welcoming U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. Reflecting on the upcoming program with SAR, Harjo shares, “The StoryMap project was a way to widen the doorway that my poet laureateship created when I became the first Native U.S. Poet Laureate. It was important to show that there are many Native poets writing poetry alongside each other, and that we speak from a sense of place in which there are no political boundaries imposed by non-Native cultures and political entities.” 

Remembering Art Wolf and Christine McHorse

Remembering Art Wolf and Christine McHorse

Last week, we lost two members of our SAR family. On Sunday, February 14, Art Wolf, the first curator of collections for the Indian Arts Research Center passed away. Just a few days later, 2006 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native artist fellow Christine McHorse also began her journey into the next world. Read more about their work and legacies.

A Healed Greenwood: Lessons in Restorative Justice Archaeology from Tulsa, Oklahoma

A Healed Greenwood: Lessons in Restorative Justice Archaeology from Tulsa, Oklahoma

“We began the class with an exercise in humility: writing down our thoughts and beliefs about Greenwood, and comparing that with broad assumptions, rumors, and questions.” Hear from SAR Anne Ray intern, Emily Santhanam, about her experience in the fall 2020 virtual in-depth course Unearthing Violence: Archaeology in the Aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre and learn how you can download the recorded course sessions.

Looking Forward, Looking Back

Looking Forward, Looking Back

With the nation’s social and political turmoil as well as an ongoing pandemic, 2020 revealed how now more than ever the perspectives of social science scholars and Native American artists matter. In today’s post, we reflect on the last year and invite you to join us for online programs in the new year.

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