Navigation and the Lost Art of Wayfinding

John Huth

Membership Lecture, The New Mexico History Museum Auditorium

Thursday, January 21, 2016, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers

Statue of Prince Henry the Navigator in LisbonStatue of Prince Henry the Navigator in LisbonBy Bryn Pinzgauer (Lisbon holiday)
[CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)],
via Wikimedia Commons.
Statue of Prince Henry the Navigator in LisbonBy Bryn Pinzgauer (Lisbon holiday)
[CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)],
via Wikimedia Commons.

Cultures, such as the Polynesians, the Vikings, and the early European explorers developed navigational schema that relied on a person’s relation to the environment to find one’s way. In the modern era we have become accustomed to instantaneous transfer of information. To find our way we use GPS and devices that guide us from Point A to Point B without giving it a second thought. Are we losing the cognitive processes that our ancestors had, and at what price? John Huth, professor of physics, explores recent work on the organization of cognitive processes in the context of navigation as a template for how we organize our lives.

Sponsored by:
Betty and Luke Vortman Endowment Fund


Series Sponsors:
Adobo Catering
Thornburg Investment Management
Betty and Luke Vortman Endowment Fund

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