Suzanne K. Fish

2014
Living The Ancient SouthwestSAR Press PublicationLiving the Ancient Southwest

How did Southwestern peoples make a living in the vast arid reaches of the Great Basin? When and why did violence erupt in the Mesa Verde region? Who were the Fremont people? How do some Hopis view Chaco Canyon? These are just a few of the topics addressed in Living the Ancient Southwest.

2008
Hohokam MillenniumSAR Press PublicationThe Hohokam MillenniumThe mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more.
2005, March 29–30
Short SeminarThe Cycles of Social and Environmental Complexity in Lowland Latin AmericaAs part of an ongoing institutional collaboration, SAR interim president George Gumerman co-chaired a March planning seminar with Santa Fe Institute (SFI) research professor J. Stephen Lansing.
2001
Women & Men in the Prehispanic SouthwestSAR Press PublicationWomen & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest: Labor, Power, and PrestigeWomen & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige.
1997, March 2–6
Advanced SeminarSex Roles and Gender Hierarchies in Middle Range Societies: Engendering Southwestern PrehistoryThe prehistoric American Southwest presents an ideal case for investigating gender issues. This advanced seminar was the first comprehensive attempt to examine the record of this region in terms of gender.
1994
Themes in Southwest PrehistorySAR Press PublicationThemes in Southwest PrehistoryTwo dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population.


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