SAR Researchers

The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is home to several administrative faculty, research associates, and senior scholars who are actively engaged in research and writing in the social sciences, humanities, and Native arts.

Current Researchers
Resident Scholar Dean FalkDean FalkSenior Scholar, 2010–PresentDean Falk is a biological anthropologist who studies the evolution of the brain and cognition. Current writing projects focus on the endocast of an australopithecine infant, the evolution of the neurological substrates of conscience, and Charles Darwin’s views about human evolution.
Steven Feld, Senior ScholarSteven FeldSenior Scholar, 2016–PresentSteven Feld is a cultural and linguistic anthropologist, filmmaker, and sound artist. His anthropology of sound research ranges from interspecies rainforest acoustic ecology in Papua New Guinea, to the pastoral history of village bells in Southern Europe, to the diasporic intimacy of jazz in West African urban modernity. His current Voices of the Rainforest project at SAR includes a digital archive, book, feature documentary film, and sound art installation to bring together 35 years of collaborative research with the Bosavi community in Papua New Guinea.
Nancy Owen LewisNancy Owen LewisScholar-in-Residence, 2011–PresentDr. Nancy Owen Lewis received her PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Massachusetts and has taught anthropology at the University of Alabama and the University of Arkansas. Her current research focuses on the health seeker movement in New Mexico.
Paul Ryer, Director of Scholar ProgramsPaul RyerStaff Scholar, 2016–PresentDr. Paul Ryer received his PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Chicago. Professor Ryer has conducted long-term research in Cuba--where he was affiliated with the University of Havana--and its diasporas. Before coming to SAR, he taught at both Williams College, Mount Holyoke College, and UC - Riverside.
David E. StuartDavid E. StuartSenior Scholar, 2013–PresentDr. Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are Prehistoric New Mexico, Anasazi America, The Guaymas Chronicles, and the recently released Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau. He earned his PhD in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and he served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs.


Former Senior Scholars
Linda CordellLinda S. CordellSenior Scholar, 2006–2013Linda S. Cordell (1943–2013) was an archaeologist whose primary research was in the U.S. Southwest with an emphasis on the 14th- and 15th-century northern and central Rio Grande Valley Ancestral Pueblo peoples.
George J. GumermanGeorge J. GumermanSenior Scholar, 2005–2016Senior Scholar George J. Gumerman has been a leader in major theoretical advances in his field since the 1960s. He is at the forefront of using computer modeling to simulate the cultural evolution of the prehistoric Southwest.
SARN. Scott MomadaySenior Scholar, 2006–2010Scott Momaday is a poet, a Pulitzer prize-winning novelist, a playwright, a painter, a storyteller, and a professor of English and American literature. He is a Native American (Kiowa), and among his chief interests are Native American art and oral tradition.
Doug SchwartzDouglas W. SchwartzSenior Scholar, 2000–2016A towering figure in the history of SAR and American archaeology, Douglas W. Schwartz, died on June 29 in Santa Fe. He was one month shy of his eighty-seventh birthday. Doug Schwartz served as president of the School for Advanced Research (formerly the School of American Research) between 1967 and 2001. He is credited with transforming SAR from a venerable but unfocused institution into one of the nation’s most important research centers in anthropology, archaeology, and Native American arts and cultures.


Former Staff Scholars
Nicole TaylorNicole TaylorStaff Scholar, 2011–2016Dr. Taylor, former Director of Scholar Programs at SAR, holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Arizona. Her research explores the interplay between gender, identity, and everyday discourse among youth vis-à-vis sociocultural factors related to weight.
 
Follow us: