Resident Scholar Series (22)

Monographs by top scholars on cutting-edge issues through the Resident Scholar Program.

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Acequia Acequia Sylvia Rodríguez Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. 2006
Ambos Nogales Ambos Nogales Photographs by Maeve Hickey; Text by Lawrence Taylor Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales. The would-be immigrant caught in the tunnel between Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona, knows life is dangerous and surprising. 2002
The Ancient City The Ancient City Edited by Joyce Marcus and Jeremy A. Sabloff Cities are so common today that we cannot imagine a world without them. More than half of the world's population lives in cities, and that proportion is growing. Yet for most of our history, there were no cities. Why, how, and when did urban life begin? 2008
“B” 
Becoming Indian Becoming Indian Circe Sturm In Becoming Indian, author Circe Sturm examines Cherokee identity politics and the phenomenon of racial shifting. Racial shifters, as described by Sturm, are people who have changed their racial self-identification from non-Indian to Indian on the US Census. 2011
“C” 
The Chaco Experience The Chaco Experience Ruth Van Dyke In a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists. 2008
“D” 
Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Jill D. Sweet This expanded edition reflects these changes by featuring the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community. The author frames their words with her own poignant reflections on more than twenty years of study and friendship with these creative and enduring people. 2004
“F” 
Fixing the Books Fixing the Books Erin Debenport In Fixing the Books, professor Erin Debenport (anthropology, University of New Mexico) presents the research she conducted on an indigenous language literacy effort within a New Mexico Pueblo community, and the potential of that literacy to compromise Pueblo secrecy.
2015
The Flow of Power The Flow of Power Vernon L. Scarborough This book is the first longitudinal study to consider water management worldwide since Karl Wittfogel put forth his “hydraulic societies” hypothesis nearly two generations ago, and it draws together the diverse debates that seminal work inspired. In so doing, Scarborough offers new models for cross-cultural analysis and prepares the ground for new examinations of power, centralization, and the economy. 2003
The Futures of Our Pasts The Futures of Our Pasts Edited by Michael A. Adler and Susan Benton Bruning Ownership of “the past”—a concept invoking age-old struggles to possess and control ancient objects—is an essential theme in understanding our global cultural heritage. Beyond ownership, however, lies the need for stewardship: the responsibility of owners, possessors, and others interested in ancient objects to serve as custodians for the benefit of present and future generations. 2012
“H” 
Half-Lives & Half-Truths Half-Lives & Half-Truths Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston The long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments. 2007
A History of the Navajos A History of the Navajos Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey; with a New Preface by Garrick Bailey  A History of the Navajos examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation. In 1868, the year that the United States government released the Navajos from four years of imprisonment at Bosque Redondo and created the Navajo reservation, their very survival was in doubt. In spite of conflicts over land and administrative control, by the 1890s they had achieved a greater level of prosperity than at any previous time in their history. 1999
“I” 
The Information Continuum The Information Continuum Barbara J. King The Information Continuum creates a synthetic view of the evolution of communication among primates. King contends that the crucial element in the evolution of information acquisition and transfer is the acquired ability to donate information to others. 1994
“K” 
Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe Kenneth Chapman’s Santa Fe The Memoirs of Kenneth Chapman, Edited, annotated, and introduced by Marit K. Munson Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider's portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe. 2008
“M” 
Making Disasters Making Disasters Craig R. Janes and Oyuntsetseg Chuluundorj

The authors argue that the intersection of neoliberal economics and the ideologies that sustain it with climate change and its attendant hazards has created a perfect storm that has had and, without serious attention to rural development, will continue to have disastrous consequences for Mongolia.

2015
Más Que Un Indio Más Que un Indio (More Than an Indian) Charles R. Hale This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects. 2006
Mimbres Painted Pottery Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition J. J. Brody The Mimbres cultural florescence between about AD 1000 and AD 1140 remains one of the most visually astonishing and anthropologically intriguing questions in Southwest prehistory. 2005
The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems Edited by Timothy A. Kohler and Sander E. van der Leeuw How should archaeologists and other social scientists tackle the big and little questions about change in socionatural systems? Although fieldwork is certainly the place to start, it alone is not enough to answer troublesome "how" or "why" questions. To make sense of what they find in the field, archaeologists build models-possible explanations for the data. 2007
“O” 
Orayvi Revisited Orayvi Revisited Jerrold E. Levy Challenging the widely held view of the Hopi Indians of Arizona as a sober, peaceful, and cooperative people with an egalitarian social organization, Levy examines the 1906 split in the Third Mesa village of Orayvi. 1992
Our Lives Our Lives Jennifer A. Shannon In 2004 the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) opened to the general public. This book, in the broadest sense, is about how that museum became what it is today. For many Native individuals, the NMAI, a prominent and permanent symbol of Native presence in America, in the shadow of the Capitol and at the center of federal power, is a triumph. 2014
“P” 
A Pueblo Social History A Pueblo Social History John A. Ware; foreword by Timothy Earle A Pueblo Social History explores the intersection of archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnology. John Ware argues that all of the key Pueblo social, ceremonial, and political institutions—and their relative importance across the Pueblo world—can only be explained in terms of indigenous social history stretching back nearly two millennia. 2014
“W” 
The Work of Sovereignty The Work of Sovereignty David Kamper The Work of Sovereignty is a study of organizing campaigns and grassroots, ad hoc collective political actions carried out by employees trying to increase control over their workplaces and their say in the political life of their communities in Indian Country. By studying them, the author takes an on-the-ground approach to tribal labor relations that puts tribal workers at the center of the action. Attending to indigenous peoples as both economic and political members of their community in this way also sheds light on processes of indigenous self-determination that are not always as readily visible as those in courtrooms and tribal council chambers. 2010
“Y” 
Yanomami Warfare Yanomami Warfare R. Brian Ferguson Generations of college students know the Yanomami as the example of "natural" aggression in human society. These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present. 1995
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