Indigenous Peoples (30)

Books on Indigenous arts, culture, and history from around the world.

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Art in Our Lives: Native Women Artists in Dialogue Art in Our Lives Edited by Cynthia Chavez Lamar and Sherry Farrell Racette with Lara Evans Art in Our Lives is the culmination of three seminars at SAR's Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) that brought together Native women artists to discuss the balancing of their art practice with their myriad roles, responsibilities, and commitments. 2010
At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds Gloria J. Emerson; Forward by N. Scott Momaday These poems, paintings, and personal reflections draw upon an ancient culture while crafting new visual and poetic "legends" to enrich our understanding of the significant places and stories that mark the traditional lands of the Navajo people. A book at once intimate, sweeping, and learned, At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds announces an important new Native American artistic voice. 2003
“B” 
Becoming Indian Becoming Indian Circe Sturm In Becoming Indian, author Circe Sturm examines Cherokee identity politics and the phenomenon of racial shifting. Racial shifters, as described by Sturm, are people who have changed their racial self-identification from non-Indian to Indian on the US Census. 2011
Beyond Red Power Beyond Red Power Edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? 2007
“D” 
Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Jill D. Sweet This expanded edition reflects these changes by featuring the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community. The author frames their words with her own poignant reflections on more than twenty years of study and friendship with these creative and enduring people. 2004
“F” 
For Indigenous Eyes Only For Indigenous Eyes Only Edited by Waziyatawin Angela Wilson and Michael Yellow Bird Recognizing an urgent need for Indigenous liberation strategies, Indigenous intellectuals met to create a book with hands-on suggestions and activities to enable Indigenous communities to decolonize themselves. The authors begin with the belief that Indigenous Peoples have the power, strength, and intelligence to develop culturally specific decolonization strategies for their own communities and thereby systematically pursue their own liberation. 2005
For Indigenous Minds Only For Indigenous Minds Only Edited by Waziyatawin and Michael Yellow Bird Included in this book are discussions of global collapse, what to consider in returning to a land-based existence, demilitarization for imperial purposes and re-militarization for Indigenous purposes, survival strategies for tribal prisoners, moving beyond the nation-state model, a land-based educational model, personal decolonization, decolonization strategies for youth in custody, and decolonizing gender roles. 2012
“H” 
A History of the Navajos A History of the Navajos Garrick Bailey and Roberta Glenn Bailey; with a New Preface by Garrick Bailey  A History of the Navajos examines these circumstances over the century and more that the tribe has lived on the reservation. In 1868, the year that the United States government released the Navajos from four years of imprisonment at Bosque Redondo and created the Navajo reservation, their very survival was in doubt. In spite of conflicts over land and administrative control, by the 1890s they had achieved a greater level of prosperity than at any previous time in their history. 1999
“I” 
Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage Joyce M. Szabo The study of what has become known as Plains Indian ledger art and of Fort Marion drawings in particular, has burgeoned in the last forty years. Joyce Szabo’s examination of the two drawing books by Zotom and Howling Wolf encompasses their origins and the issues surrounding their commission as well as what the images say about their creators and their collector. 2011
Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest Indian Basketry Artists of the Southwest Susan Brown McGreevy; Foreword by Kevin Navasie Exploring the history and the current renaissance of basket making in the Native American Southwest, this lavishly illustrated volume features the work and words of the contemporary basket makers that participated in a Convocation at the School of American Research. The basket makers range in age from twenty-one to eighty-two and represent the Akimel O’odham, Apache, Hopi, Navajo, Pueblo, and Tohono O’odham tribes. 2001
Indian Painters of the Southwest Indian Painters of the Southwest Katherine L. Chase; Foreward by Diane Reyna The book profiles ten outstanding painters representing seven different Pueblo Indian groups and the Navajo Nation who participated in a convocation at the Indian Arts Research Center at the SAR. While some artists have chosen to depict traditional scenes and symbols and others have chosen to create modern works influenced by Euro-American painting, all draw on the “deep remembering” of tribal heritage and personal experience and a heightened awareness of the artist’s role in more than one modern world. 2002
Indian Policies in the Americas Indian Policies in the Americas William Y. Adams In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies. 2014
Indian Subjects Indian Subjects Edited by Brenda J. Child and Brian Klopotek Indian Subjects brings together an outstanding group of scholars from the fields of anthropology, history, law, education, literature, and Native studies to address indigenous education throughout different regions and eras. 2014
Indians & Energy Indians & Energy Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner The authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future. 2010
“K” 
Keystone Nations Keystone Nations Edited by Benedict J. Colombi and James F. Brooks The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book. 2012
“M” 
Más Que Un Indio Más Que un Indio (More Than an Indian) Charles R. Hale This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects. 2006
Maya Nationalisms and Postcolonial Challenges in Guatemala Maya Nationalisms and Postcolonial Challenges in Guatemala Emilio del Valle Escalante This book focuses on the emergence and political-cultural implications of Guatemala’s Maya movement. 2009
Mimbres Painted Pottery Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition J. J. Brody The Mimbres cultural florescence between about AD 1000 and AD 1140 remains one of the most visually astonishing and anthropologically intriguing questions in Southwest prehistory. 2005
“N” 
No Deal! No Deal! Edited by Tressa Berman No Deal! encompasses a diverse group of artists, curators, art historians, and anthropologists from Australia and North America in order to investigate social relations of possession through the artifacts and motifs of Indigenous expressive culture. The contributors speak from the standpoints of Indigenous systems of knowledge as well as from western epistemologies and their institutions, interrogating what it means to “own culture.” The case studies in this volume contribute to notions of “ownership” and “possession” through the lens of art and its associated rights to production, circulation, performance, and representation. 2012
“O” 
One State, Many Nations One State, Many Nations Maximilian Viatori This book traces the process of self-organization and emergence within Ecuador’s Indigenous movement from 1998 to 2008 for the Zápara nationality, one of the smallest Indigenous groups in Ecuador, to explore the complex role that multiculturalism has played in local identity politics. 2010
Otros Saberes Otros Saberes Edited by Charles R. Hale and Lynn Stephen The six research projects that form the core of the Otros Saberes initiative bring together a diverse group of Afro-descendant and indigenous collaborations with academics. The focus of each research project is driven by a strategic priority in the life of the community, organization, or social movement concerned. This book, written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, provides an explanation of the key analytical questions and findings of each project. 2014
“Our Indian Princess” “Our Indian Princess” Nancy Marie Mithlo In this pathbreaking study, anthropologist Nancy Marie Mithlo examines the power of stereotypes, the utility of pan-Indianism, the significance of realist ideologies, and the employment of alterity in Native American arts. 2009
Our Lives Our Lives Jennifer A. Shannon In 2004 the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) opened to the general public. This book, in the broadest sense, is about how that museum became what it is today. For many Native individuals, the NMAI, a prominent and permanent symbol of Native presence in America, in the shadow of the Capitol and at the center of federal power, is a triumph. 2014
“P” 
Painting the Underworld Sky Painting the Underworld Sky Mateo Romero, with a foreword by Suzan Shown Harjo Painter Mateo Romero uses a bold, muscular style and thick, expressive paint to expose the fault lines and tragedies afflicting Native people today. At the same time, he offers a meditation on the difficult yet artistically stimulating process of cultural diaspora and return in which he and many other Native artists are engaged. 2006
The People The People Text and photographs by Stephen Trimble Fifty Indian nations lie within the modern American Southwest, communities sustained through four centuries of European and American contact by their cultural traditions and ties to the land. In The People, Stephen Trimble provides an introduction to these Native peoples that is unrivaled in its scope and readability. 1993
Pueblo Indian Painting Pueblo Indian Painting J. J. Brody A new tradition of Pueblo fine art painting arose in the first three decades of the twentieth century, born out of a dynamic encounter between the Pueblo and Euro-American communities in and around Santa Fe, New Mexico. 1997
A Pueblo Social History A Pueblo Social History John A. Ware; foreword by Timothy Earle A Pueblo Social History explores the intersection of archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnology. John Ware argues that all of the key Pueblo social, ceremonial, and political institutions—and their relative importance across the Pueblo world—can only be explained in terms of indigenous social history stretching back nearly two millennia. 2014
“R” 
Roosters at Midnight Roosters at Midnight Robert Albro Roosters at Midnight is an ethnography about the political lives and careers of a growing urban-dwelling and indigenous constituency that operates primarily within the informal economy in and around the provincial capital Quillacollo. 2010
“T” 
Talking with the Clay, 20th Anniversary Revised Edition Talking with the Clay, 20th Anniversary Revised Edition Stephen Trimble When you hold a Pueblo pot in your hands, you feel a tactile connection through the clay to the potter and to centuries of tradition. You will find no better guide to this feeling than Talking with the Clay. 2007
“W” 
The Work of Sovereignty The Work of Sovereignty David Kamper The Work of Sovereignty is a study of organizing campaigns and grassroots, ad hoc collective political actions carried out by employees trying to increase control over their workplaces and their say in the political life of their communities in Indian Country. By studying them, the author takes an on-the-ground approach to tribal labor relations that puts tribal workers at the center of the action. Attending to indigenous peoples as both economic and political members of their community in this way also sheds light on processes of indigenous self-determination that are not always as readily visible as those in courtrooms and tribal council chambers. 2010
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