Cultural Anthropology (66)

Scholarly works in cultural or social anthropology.

  Sort by:
Acequia Acequia Sylvia Rodríguez Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity. 2006
Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology. 2006
American Arrivals American Arrivals Edited by Nancy Foner Soaring immigration to the United States in the past few decades has reawakened both popular and scholarly interest in this important issue. American Arrivals highlights the important insights of anthropology for the field of migration studies. 2003
Anthropology in the Margins of the State Anthropology in the Margins of the State Edited by Veena Das and Deborah Poole The very form and reach of the modern state are changing radically under the pressure of globalization. Featuring nine of the leading scholars in the field, this innovative exploration of these transformations develops an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: Africa, Latin America, and South Asia. 2004
“C” 
Cash on the Table Cash on the Table Edited by Edward F. Fischer A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior. 2014
Catastrophe & Culture Catastrophe & Culture Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment. 2002
Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Edited by Stanley E. Hyland “Community” has long been a critical concept for social scientists, and never more so amid the growing economic inequity, natural and human disasters, and warfare of the opening years of the twenty-first century. In this volume, leading scholar-activists develop a conceptual framework for both the theory and practice of building communities. 2005
Confronting Cancer Confronting Cancer Edited by Juliet McMullin and Diane Weiner In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail. 2009
Critical Anthropology Now Critical Anthropology Now Edited by George E. Marcus Building on the legacy of Writing Culture, Critical Anthropology Now vividly represents the changing nature of anthropological research practice, demonstrating how new and more complicated locations of research-from the boardrooms of multinational corporations to the chat rooms of the Internet-are giving rise to shifts in the character of fieldwork and fieldworker. 1999
Crumpled Paper Boat Crumpled Paper Boat Edited by Anand Pandian and Stuart McLean

Crumpled Paper Boat is a book of experimental ventures in ethnographic writing, an exploration of the possibilities of a literary anthropology. These original essays from notable writers in the field blur the boundaries between ethnography and genres such as poetry, fiction, memoir, and cinema.

2017
Cyborgs & Citadels Cyborgs & Citadels Edited by Gary Lee Downey and Joseph Dumit Some of the country’s most influential thinkers use anthropological methods and theories to examine the practices and practitioners of contemporary science, technology, and medicine in the United States. The authors explore such questions as how science gains authority to direct truth practices, the boundaries between humans and machines, and how science, technology, and medicine contribute to the fashioning of selves. 1998
“D” 
Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians Jill D. Sweet This expanded edition reflects these changes by featuring the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community. The author frames their words with her own poignant reflections on more than twenty years of study and friendship with these creative and enduring people. 2004
Democracy Democracy Edited by Julia Paley While previous scholars of democracy have proposed one definitive model after another, the authors in this work suggest that democracy is by nature an open ended set of questions about the workings of power—questions best engaged through the dialogical processes of fieldwork and ethnographic writing. 2008
Demographic Anthropology Demographic Anthropology Edited by Ezra B. W. Zubrow The articles in this book explore relationships between demographic variables and culture, emphasizing cultural and biological structures and processes connected to population trends. In addition, the book covers topics dealing with sedentism, kinship, childhood marriage association, and stable and unstable economic growth. 1976
Development & Dispossession Development & Dispossession Edited by Anthony Oliver-Smith Resettlement has been so poorly planned, financed, implemented, and administered that these projects end up being “development disasters.” Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions. 2009
Dreaming Dreaming Edited by Barbara Tedlock The ten contributors to this book-anthropologists and psychologists-explore the ways in which dreams are remembered, recounted, shared (or not shared), interpreted, and used by people from New Guinea to the Andes. The authors take a major step toward moving the study of dreaming from the margins to the mainstream of anthropological thought. 1992
The Dying Community The Dying Community Edited by Art Gallaher, Jr. and Harland Padfield This book is a thorough exploration of the decline of the little community in the face of urbanization, industrialization, and bureaucratization. Developing a conceptual and theoretical framework for examining community decline and dissolution, the book looks at the relationships between the dying community and its natural resource base, the role of outside political authority, and the social and demographical processes associated with community decline. 1980
“E” 
Elites Ethnographic Issues Elites Edited by George E. Marcus This book is a collection of essays focusing on the role that elites play in shaping modern societies. Critiquing the treatment accorded elites as subjects in recent Western social thought, the essays reflect upon past results and explore directions in the investigation of elite groups by anthropologists. 1983
The Empire of Things The Empire of Things Edited by Fred R. Myers Representing a new wave of thinking about material culture studies-a topic long overdue for reevaluation-the essays in this volume take a fresh look at the relationship between material culture and exchange theory and illuminate the changing patterns of cultural flow in an increasingly global economy and the cultural differences registered in “regimes of value.” 2002
Entrepreneurs in Cultural Context Entrepreneurs in Cultural Context Edited by Sidney M. Greenfield, Arnold Strickon, and Robert T. Aubey This book is a collection of essays on business behavior that examine the relationships between business enterprises and family networks. The essays deal with universal subjects that describe the effects of marriage, death, and birth upon the individual and corporate enterprise. 1979
“F” 
Fabric of Indigeneity The Fabric of Indigeneity ann-elise lewallen

In present-day Japan, Ainu women create spaces of cultural vitalization in which they can move between “being Ainu” through their natal and affinal relationships and actively “becoming Ainu” through their craftwork.

2016
Fat Planet Fat Planet Edited by Eileen P. Anderson-Fye and Alexandra Brewis Fat Planet represents a collaborative effort to consider at a global scale what fat stigma is and what it does to people. 2017
Figuring the Future Figuring the Future Edited by Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham Child laborers in South Asia, child soldiers in Sierra Leone and Uganda, Chinese youth playing computer games to earn virtual gold, youth involved in sex trafficking in the former Soviet republics and Thailand: these are just some of the young people featured in the news of late. To address how and why youth and children have come to seem so important to globalization, the contributors to this book look at the both the spatial relations and the temporal dimensions of globalization in places as far apart as Oakland, California, and Tamatave, Madagascar, in situations as disparate as the idealization of childhood innocence and the brutal lives of street children. 2008
Forces of Compassion Forces of Compassion Edited by Erica Bornstein and Peter Redfield Suffering and charity have a long history. Both human sorrows and attempted remedies were familiar features of life in earlier eras and religious traditions, however, during the final decades of the twentieth century, natural disasters and civilian casualties of war transformed into “humanitarian crises.” In these recurring dramas presented by international media, an extensive network of interstate entities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) supplies assistance to victims. 2011
“G” 
The Gender of Globalization The Gender of Globalization Edited by Nandini Gunewardena & Ann Kingsolver As “globalization” moves rapidly from buzzword to cliché, evaluating the claims of neoliberal capitalism to empower and enrich remains urgently important. The authors in this volume employ feminist, ethnographic methods to examine what free trade and export processing zones, economic liberalization, and currency reform mean to women in Argentina, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Ghana, the United States, India, Jamaica, and many other places. 2008
Global Health in Times of Violence Global Health in Times of Violence Edited by Barbara Rylko-Bauer, Linda Whiteford, and Paul Farmer Over 24 million people have died in these conflicts, and millions more suffered illness and injury. In this volume, leading scholars and practitioners examine the impact of structural, military, and communal violence on health, psychosocial well-being, and health care delivery. By investigating the fields of violence that define our modern world, the authors are able to provide alternative global health paradigms that can be used to develop more effective policies and programs. 2009
The Global Middle Classes The Global Middle Classes Edited by Rachel Heiman, Carla Freeman, and Mark Liechty Surging middle-class aspirations and anxieties throughout the world have recently compelled anthropologists to pay serious attention to middle classes and middle-class spaces, sentiments, lifestyles, labors, and civic engagements. 2012
Globalization, Water, & Health Globalization, Water, & Health Edited by Linda Whiteford and Scott Whiteford This book is about crime and passion, life and death, lofty goals and squalid realities. It is a book about water. Global disparities in health and access to water are two major threats to world stability. 2005
Gray Areas Gray Areas Edited by Philip B. Stafford This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living. 2003
“H” 
Half-Lives & Half-Truths Half-Lives & Half-Truths Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston The long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments. 2007
Historical Ecology Historical Ecology Edited by Carole L. Crumley Environmental change is one of the most pressing problems facing the world community. In this volume, the authors take a critical step toward establishing a new environmental science by deconstructing the traditional culture/nature dichotomy and placing human/environmental interaction at the center of any new attempts to deal with global environmental change. 1994
History in Person History in Person Edited by Dorothy Holland and Jean Lave Extended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today. 2001
“I” 
Images That Move Images That Move Edited by Patricia Spyer and Mary Margaret Steedly Images play a significant part in projects of “poetic world-making” and political transformation. They participate in the production of commensuration or of incommensurability, enact moments of prophecy or exposure, and attract or repel spectators’ attention. But any examination of images in motion must also recognize the blockages and breakdowns that prevent their movement, as well as the enframings or “stickinesses” that trap them in particular places and prevent them from reaching others. 2013
Imperial Formations Imperial Formations Edited by Ann Stoler, Carole McGranahan, and Peter Perdue The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies. 2007
“K” 
Katherine Dunham Katherine Dunham Edited by Elizabeth Chin This book explores Katherine Dunham’s contribution to anthropology and the ongoing relevance of her ideas and methodologies, rejecting the idea that art and academics need to be cleanly separated from each other. 2014
“L” 
Law & Empire in the Pacific Law & Empire in the Pacific Edited by Sally Engle Merry and Donald Brenneis Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty. Speaking to Fijian and Hawaiian circumstances, this volume illuminates the role of legal and archival practice in constructing ethnic and political identities and producing colonial and anthropological knowledge. 2004
Linking the Histories Linking the Histories of Slavery Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

2015
“M” 
Making Disasters Making Disasters Craig R. Janes and Oyuntsetseg Chuluundorj

The authors argue that the intersection of neoliberal economics and the ideologies that sustain it with climate change and its attendant hazards has created a perfect storm that has had and, without serious attention to rural development, will continue to have disastrous consequences for Mongolia.

2015
Más Que Un Indio Más Que un Indio (More Than an Indian) Charles R. Hale This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects. 2006
Memory, History, and Opposition Memory, History, and Opposition under State Socialism Edited by Rubie S. Watson Eight anthropologists, sociologists, and historians probe the oppositional narratives created by Chinese rural intellectuals, èmigrè Croats, and organized dissenters such as the Djilas of Yugoslavia who constructed and maintained oppositional histories in state socialist societies. 1994
Muslim Youth and the 9/11 Generation Muslim Youth and the 9/11 Generation Edited by Adeline Masquelier and Benjamin F. Soares

A new cohort of Muslim youth has arisen since the attacks of 9/11, facilitated by the proliferation of recent communication technologies and the Internet. By focusing on these young people as a heterogeneous global cohort, the contributors to this volume—who draw from a variety of disciplines—show how the study of Muslim youth at this particular historical juncture is relevant to thinking about the anthropology of youth, the anthropology of Islamic and Muslim societies, and the post-9/11 world more generally.

2016
“N” 
Nature, Science, and Religion Nature, Science, and Religion Edited by Catherine M. Tucker This book is about the complicated and provocative ways nature, science, and religion intersect in real settings where people attempt to live in harmony with the physical environment. The contributors explore how scientific knowledge and spiritual beliefs are engaged to shape natural resource management, environmental activism, and political processes. 2012
New Landscapes of Inequality New Landscapes of Inequality Edited by Jane L. Collins, Micaela di Leonardo, & Brett Williams Focusing on the United States, the contributors to this volume analyze how the globalization of newly untrammeled capitalism has exacerbated preexisting inequalities, how the retreat of the benevolent state and the rise of the punitive, imperial state are related, how poorly privatized welfare institutions provide services, how neoliberal and neoconservative ideologies are melding, and how recurrent moral panics misrepresent class, race, gendered, and sexual realities on the ground. 2008
New Perspectives on the Pueblos New Perspectives on the Pueblos Edited by Alfonso Ortiz

This volume, the result of an advanced seminar at the School of American Research, takes a fresh look at Pueblo Indian culture, with chapters on everything from language to religion, prehistory, ecology, and from literature to music.

1972
“O” 
One State, Many Nations One State, Many Nations Maximilian Viatori This book traces the process of self-organization and emergence within Ecuador’s Indigenous movement from 1998 to 2008 for the Zápara nationality, one of the smallest Indigenous groups in Ecuador, to explore the complex role that multiculturalism has played in local identity politics. 2010
Orayvi Revisited Orayvi Revisited Jerrold E. Levy Challenging the widely held view of the Hopi Indians of Arizona as a sober, peaceful, and cooperative people with an egalitarian social organization, Levy examines the 1906 split in the Third Mesa village of Orayvi. 1992
Other Intentions Other Intentions Edited by Lawrence Rosen The authors argue that although intentionality might appear to be a wholly abstract phenomenon, it is deeply entwined with the nature and distribution of power, the portrayal of events, the assessment of personhood, the interplay of trust and deception, and the assessment of moral and legal responsibility. 1995
“P” 
Pharmaceutical Self Pharmaceutical Self Edited by Janis H. Jenkins This book addresses a critical contemporary issue—the worldwide proliferation of pharmaceutical use. The contributors explore questions such as: How are culturally constituted selves transformed by regular ingestion of pharmaceutical drugs? Does “being human” increasingly come to mean not only oriented to drugs but also created and regulated by them? From the standpoint of cultural phenomenology, does this reshape human “being”? 2011
Pluralizing Ethnography Pluralizing Ethnography Edited by John M.Watanabe and Edward F. Fischer This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala. 2004
“R” 
Recapturing Anthropology Recapturing Anthropology Edited by Richard G. Fox The ten papers in this volume offer different versions of how and where anthropologists might work usefully in today's world, converging on the issue of how anthropology can best recapture the progressive character its basic concepts, such as "culture," once had. 1991
Remaking Life & Death Remaking Life & Death Edited by Sarah Franklin and Margaret Lock The boundaries of life now occupy a place of central concern among biological anthropologists. Because of the centrality of the modern biological definition of life to Euro-American medicine and anthropology, the definition of life itself and its contestation exemplify competing uses of knowledge. 2003
Remapping Bolivia Remapping Bolivia Edited by Nicole Fabricant and Bret Gustafson The 2005 election of Evo Morales to the presidency of Bolivia marked a critical moment of transformation—a coca farmer and peasant union leader became the first indigenous president in the history of the Americas. 2011
Roosters at Midnight Roosters at Midnight Robert Albro Roosters at Midnight is an ethnography about the political lives and careers of a growing urban-dwelling and indigenous constituency that operates primarily within the informal economy in and around the provincial capital Quillacollo. 2010
“S” 
Seduced and Betrayed Seduced and Betrayed Edited by Milford Bateman and Kate Maclean, foreword by James K. Galbraith

The contributors contend that over the last twenty years, microfinance policies have exacerbated poverty and exclusion, undermined gender empowerment, underpinned a massive growth in inequality, destroyed solidarity and trust in the community, and, overall, manifestly weakened those local economies of the Global South where it reached critical mass.

Available April 2017
The Seductions of Community The Seductions of Community Edited by Gerald W. Creed The concept of "community" is ubiquitous in the way we talk and think about life in the twentyfirst century. Political and economic projects from rainforest conservation to urban empowerment zones focus on "the community" as the appropriate vehicle and target of change. 2006
Senses of Place Senses of Place Edited by Steven Feld and Keith H. Basso The complex relationship of people to places has come under increasing scholarly scrutiny in recent years as acute global conditions of exile, displacement, and inflamed borders-to say nothing of struggles by indigenous peoples and cultural minorities for ancestral homelands, land rights, and retention of sacred places-have brought the political question of place into sharp focus. 1996
The Shape of Script The Shape of Script Edited by Stephen D. Houston This book builds on earlier projects about the origins and extinctions of script traditions throughout the world in an effort to address the fundamental questions of how and why writing systems change. The contributors—who study ancient scripts from Arabic to Roman, from Bronze Age China to Middle Kingdom Egypt—utilize an approach that views writing less as a technology than as a mode of communication, one that is socially learned and culturally transmitted. 2012
Small Worlds Small Worlds Edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, & John Walton Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases. 2008
Street Economies in the Urban Global South Street Economies in the Urban Global South Edited by Karen Tranberg Hansen, Walter E. Little, and B. Lynne Milgram This book focuses on the economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of street economies across the urban Global South. Although contestations over public space have a long history, Street Economies in the Urban Global South presents the argument that the recent conjuncture of neoliberal economic policies and unprecedented urban growth in the Global South has changed the equation. 2014
Structure and Process in Latin America Structure and Process in Latin America Edited by Arnold Strickon and Sidney M. Greenfield This book provides analysis of social anthropology and approaches to the study of patronage and clientage from work done in Latin America in the late 1960s. Essays include discussions on topics as diverse as the effect of societal structures on the actions of individuals and communities wherein women play the roles of both patrons and clients. 1972
“T” 
Timely Assets Timely Assets Edited by Elizabeth Emma Ferry and Mandana E. Limbert Oil is running out. What’s more, its final depletion, once relegated to a misty future, now seems imminent. In all the more or less apocalyptic discussions of oil and similar depleted resources, nature, labor, and time converge. This volume focuses on how resources, resource-making, and resource-claiming are entangled with experiences of time. 2008
“V” 
Violence Violence Edited by Neil L.Whitehead Can we understand violence not as evidence of cultural rupture but as a form of cultural expression itself? Ten prominent scholars engage this question across geographies as diverse at their theoretical positions, in cases drawn from fieldwork in Indonesia, Cambodia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South America, Sri Lanka, Spain, and the United States. 2004
Vital Relations Vital Relations Edited by Susan McKinnon and Fenella Cannell For more than 150 years, theories of social evolution, development, and modernity have been unanimous in their assumption that kinship organizes simpler, “traditional,” pre-state societies but not complex, “modern,” state societies. And these theories have been unanimous in their presupposition that within modern state-based societies kinship has been relegated to the domestic domain, has lost its economic and political functions, has retained no organizing force in modern political and economic structures and processes, and has become secularized and rationalized. Vital Relations challenges these notions. 2013
“W” 
War in the Tribal Zone War in the Tribal Zone Edited by R. Brian Ferguson and Neil L.Whitehead; With a New Preface by the Editors War in the Tribal Zone, the 1991 anthropology of war classic, is back in print with a new Preface by the editors. Their timely and insightful essay examines the occurrence of ethnic conflict and violence in the decade since the idea of the 'tribal zone' originally was formulated. 1992
The Work of Sovereignty The Work of Sovereignty David Kamper The Work of Sovereignty is a study of organizing campaigns and grassroots, ad hoc collective political actions carried out by employees trying to increase control over their workplaces and their say in the political life of their communities in Indian Country. By studying them, the author takes an on-the-ground approach to tribal labor relations that puts tribal workers at the center of the action. Attending to indigenous peoples as both economic and political members of their community in this way also sheds light on processes of indigenous self-determination that are not always as readily visible as those in courtrooms and tribal council chambers. 2010
“Y” 
Yanomami Warfare Yanomami Warfare R. Brian Ferguson Generations of college students know the Yanomami as the example of "natural" aggression in human society. These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present. 1995
Follow us: