Archaeology (74)

Scholarly and popular works in archaeology.

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Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology. 2006
The Ancient City The Ancient City Edited by Joyce Marcus and Jeremy A. Sabloff Cities are so common today that we cannot imagine a world without them. More than half of the world's population lives in cities, and that proportion is growing. Yet for most of our history, there were no cities. Why, how, and when did urban life begin? 2008
Ancient Civilization and Trade Ancient Civilization and Trade Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography.

1975
Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management Edited by Lynne Sebastian and William D. Lipe By most estimates, as much as 90 percent of the archaeology done in the United States today is carried out in the field of cultural resource management. The contributors hope that this book will serve as an impetus in American archaeology for dialogue and debate on how to make CRM projects and programs yield both better archaeology and better public policy. 2010
The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon Edited by Stephen H. Lekson The site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. 2006
The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters Edited by Gil J. Stein Colonialism and its legacies have emerged as one of the most important research topics in anthropology. Indeed, we now understand that colonialism gave rise to and shaped the discipline. However, the understanding of colonization in anthropology, history, and other fields derives largely from studies of European expansion. 2005
An Archaeology of Doings An Archaeology of Doings Severin M. Fowles In this probing study, Severin Fowles undertakes a sustained critique of religion as an analytical category in archaeological research. 2013
The Archaeology of Lower Central America The Archaeology of Lower Central America Edited by Fredrick W. Lange and Doris Z. Stone This book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development. 1984
Archaic State Interaction Archaic State Interaction Edited by William A. Parkinson and Michael L. Galaty By using a specific case study, the contributors to this book aim to help establish a common theoretical ground for investigating how humans and the societies they built interacted over time. 2010
Archaic States Archaic States Edited by Gary M. Feinman and Joyce Marcus One of the most challenging problems facing contemporary archaeology concerns the operation and diversity of ancient states. This volume addresses how ancient states were structured and how they operated, an understanding of which is key to our ability to interpret a state's rise or fall. 1998
The Architecture of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico The Architecture of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Winifred Creamer From 1971 to 1974, the School of American Research conducted a major multidisciplinary program of excavation and research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth-century Rio Grande sites. At its peak, Arroyo Hondo contained about one thousand rooms. This seventh volume in the series is focused on the walls, roomblocks, and architecture of public spaces at the site. 1993
Prehistoric Pueblo Settlement Patterns The Arroyo Hondo New Mexico Site Survey D. Bruce Dickson Jr. This second volume in the Arroyo Hondo series provides the results of the archaeological survey of this large prehistoric pueblo located just southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. 1979
“B” 
Big Histories, Human Lives Big Histories, Human Lives Edited by John Robb and Timothy R. Pauketat The contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories. 2013
Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death Edited by Aubrey Baadsgaard, Alexis T. Boutin, and Jane E. Buikstra Taking cues from current theoretical perspectives and capitalizing on the strengths of new and sophisticated methods of analysis, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains. 2012
The Bright Angel Site The Bright Angel Site Douglas W. Schwartz, Michael P. Marshall, and Jane Kepp Timeless Classics includes revived titles long out-of-print and brought to you via a print-on-demand publishing program. These titles have not been modified from the original and are now presented in paperback. 1979
“C” 
A Catalyst for Ideas A Catalyst for Ideas Edited by Vernon L. Scarborough In his thirty-four years as president of the School of American Research, Douglas W. Schwartz's far-reaching vision placed SAR on the intellectual edge of research about humans across the globe. Nowhere is this more evident than in his influence on the field of anthropological archaeology. 2005
Chaco & Hohokam Chaco & Hohokam Edited by Patricia L. Crown and W. James Judge Synthesizing data and current thought about the regional systems of the Chacoans and the Hohokam, eleven archaeologists examine settlement patterns, subsistence economy, social organization, and trade, shedding new light on two of the most sophisticated cultures of the prehistoric Southwest. 1991
The Chaco Experience The Chaco Experience Ruth Van Dyke In a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists. 2008
Chan Chan Andean Desert City Chan Chan Edited by Michael E. Moseley and Kent C. Day The fourteen essays in this book focus on the Chan Chan-Moche Valley Project and analyze its five-year archaeological study. It includes chapters on irrigation, excavation results, and sociopolitical organization during the Early Intermediate Period in Peru. 1982
The Chemistry of Prehistoric Human Bone The Chemistry of Prehistoric Human Bone

Bone chemistry is one of the most promising analytical methods now being used by archaeologists and physical anthropologists to investigate the past of the human species, and this state-of-the-art book includes many of the leading scientists in the field among its contributors.

1989
The Classic Maya Collapse The Classic Maya Collapse Edited by T. Patrick Culbert

Of the many mysteries surrounding ancient Maya civilization, none has attracted greater interest than its collapse in the eighth and ninth centuries AD. Until recently, speculations on the causes of the collapse have been more numerous than excavated sites in the area. But the past twenty-five years have produced many new findings. In this book, thirteen leading scholars use new data to revise the image of ancient Maya civilization and create a new model of its collapse—a general model of sociopolitical collapse not limited to the cultural history of the Maya alone.

1973
The Contemporary Ecology of Arroyo Hondo New Mexico The Contemporary Ecology of Arroyo Hondo New Mexico N. Edmund Kelley From 1971 to 1974, the School of American Research conducted a major multidisciplinary program of excavation and research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth-century Rio Grande sites. This first volume in the series covers the area’s topography, geology, soil, climate, hydrology, vegetation, and animal life. 1983
Copán Copán Edited by E. Wyllys Andrews and William L. Fash This volume collects leading scholarship on one of the most important archaeological complexes in the ancient Maya world. The authors-internationally renowned experts who participated in the long-running Copán Acropolis Archaeological Project-address enduring themes in Maya archaeology. 2005
Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Cowboys & Cave Dwellers Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs. 1997
“D” 
SAR Press - Disturbing Bodies Disturbing Bodies Edited by Zoë Crossland and Rosemary A. Joyce

Although often considered narrowly in terms of its technical and methodological aspects, forensic practice draws upon multiple dimensions of anthropology, and this volume offers a range of anthropological perspectives on the work of exhumation and the attendant issues.

2015
“E” 
The Emergence of Modern Humans, Book Cover The Emergence of Modern Humans

This volume is a collection of essays identifying the current issues regarding the origins and emergence of a “modern” human biological and behavioral pattern from the earlier patterns inferred for late archaic humans. They identify changing behavioral complexes in human life during the period between 120,000 and 20,000 years ago, and examine paleontological and archaeological approaches to such phenomena. 

1989
Enduring Conquests Enduring Conquests Edited by Matthew Liebmann and Melissa S. Murphy Enduring Conquests presents new interpretations of Native American experiences under Spanish colonialism and challenges the reader to reexamine long-standing assumptions about the Spanish conquests of the Americas. 2011
The Evolution of Leadership The Evolution of Leadership Edited by Kevin J. Vaughn, Jelmer W. Eerkens, and John Kantner This book brings together the perspectives of cultural anthropologists and archaeologists to explore why and how leadership emerges and variously becomes institutionalized among disparate human societies. 2010
Explorations in Ethnoarchaeology Explorations in Ethnoarchaeology Edited by Richard A. Gould

By observing changes in ancient midden deposits, or modern waste, the ethnoarchaeologist is able to theorize about relationships between these material remains and the human behavior that produced them. The contributors to this book cover diverse societies and attempt to establish behavioral patterns from the study of what humans leave behind.

1978
“F” 
The Faunal Remains from Arroyou Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico The Faunal Remains from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Richard W. Lang and Arthur H. Harris This fifth volume presents the results of faunal analysis from the Arroyo Hondo excavations, covering the topics of prehistoric vegetation and climate; the importance of various animals in the diet; seasonal hunting patterns; methods of butchering, skinning and cooking; the prehistoric hunting territory; the raising of domesticated dogs and turkeys; and trade in animals and animal products. 1984
First Coastal Californians First Coastal Californians Edited by Lynn H. Gamble

Some of the most complex hunter-gatherer societies on earth flourished along California’s rugged coastline, and this volume brings together an impressive group of experts to tell the story of these Native groups’ brilliant adaptations to intensely challenging physical and social environments.

2015
The Flow of Power The Flow of Power Vernon L. Scarborough This book is the first longitudinal study to consider water management worldwide since Karl Wittfogel put forth his “hydraulic societies” hypothesis nearly two generations ago, and it draws together the diverse debates that seminal work inspired. In so doing, Scarborough offers new models for cross-cultural analysis and prepares the ground for new examinations of power, centralization, and the economy. 2003
Food, Diet, and Population at Prehistoric Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Food, Diet, and Population at Prehistoric Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Wilma Wetterstrom; additional reports by Vorsila L. Bohrer and Richard W. Lang This sixth volume in the Arroyo Hondo series provides information on the food, diet, and population analysis of this large prehistoric pueblo located just southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. 1986
The Futures of Our Pasts The Futures of Our Pasts Edited by Michael A. Adler and Susan Benton Bruning Ownership of “the past”—a concept invoking age-old struggles to possess and control ancient objects—is an essential theme in understanding our global cultural heritage. Beyond ownership, however, lies the need for stewardship: the responsibility of owners, possessors, and others interested in ancient objects to serve as custodians for the benefit of present and future generations. 2012
“G” 
The Great Basin The Great Basin Edited by Catherine S. Fowler and Don D. Fowler This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment. 2008
Great Excavations Great Excavations Melinda Elliott The magnificent ruins of the prehistoric peoples of the American Southwest have always been a source of wonder and awe. But the stories of the men and women who devoted their lives to the discovery and study of these lost cultures and the places they called home have never before been adequately told. Now, in Great Excavations, journalist and researcher Melinda Elliott uncovers the crucial and exciting role played by the great archaeologists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in unearthing the Southwest’s prehistoric past. 1995
“H” 
Hisat'sinom Hisat’sinom Edited by Christian E. Downum The national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma’s Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples “Hisat’sinom,” and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.
2012
Historical Ecology Historical Ecology Edited by Carole L. Crumley Environmental change is one of the most pressing problems facing the world community. In this volume, the authors take a critical step toward establishing a new environmental science by deconstructing the traditional culture/nature dichotomy and placing human/environmental interaction at the center of any new attempts to deal with global environmental change. 1994
A History of the Ancient Southwest A History of the Ancient Southwest Stephen H. Lekson According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. 2009
Hohokam Millennium The Hohokam Millennium Edited by Suzanne K. Fish and Paul R. Fish The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more. 2008
“I” 
Ideology Ideology and Pre-Columbian Civilizations Edited by Arthur A. Demarest and Geoffrey W. Conrad Employing data from central Mexico, the Maya area, coastal Peru, and highland Peru and Bolivia, directors of several major archaeological field projects interpret evidence of prehistoric ideology and address the question, has ideology any relevance in the reconstruction of prehistory? 1992
In Search of Chaco In Search of Chaco Edited by David Grant Noble Startling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the “Chaco Phenomenon” since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers. 2004
“L” 
Last Hunters, First Farmers Last Hunters, First Farmers Edited by T. Douglas Price and Anne Birgitte Gebauer In case studies ranging from the Far East to the American Southwest, the authors of Last Hunters-First Farmers provide a global perspective on contemporary research into the origins of agriculture. Downplaying more traditional explanations of the turn to agriculture, such as the influence of marginal environments and population pressures, the authors emphasize instead the importance of the resource-rich areas in which agriculture began, the complex social organizations already in place, the role of sedentism, and, in some locales, the advent of economic intensification and competition. 1996
Late Lowland Maya Civilization Late Lowland Maya Civilization Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and E. Wyllys Andrews V

In light of new and expanding research, the contributors to this volume premise that the relationship of Classic to Postclassic in the Northern and Southern Maya Lowlands is much more complex than was traditionally thought. The essays offer a useful introduction to current thought regarding the development of Lowland Maya civilization after the collapse of the Classic Period in the South.

1986
Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns Edited by Wendy Ashmore This book is a series of essays that offers a framework for the study of lowland Maya settlement patterns, surveying the range of interpretive ideas about ancient Maya remains. Suggesting hypotheses to guide future research, the articles discuss historical, geographical, chronological, and theoretical matters. 1981
“M” 
Making Alternative Histories Making Alternative Histories Edited by Peter R. Schmidt and Thomas C. Patterson After working in Third World contexts for more than a century, many archaeologists from the West have yet to hear and understand the voices of their colleagues in non-Western cultural settings. In Making Alternative Histories, eleven scholars from Africa, India, Latin America, North America, and Europe debate and discuss how to respond to the erasures of local histories by colonialism, neocolonial influences, and the practice of archaeology and history as we know them today in North America and much of the Western world. 1995
Memory Work Memory Work Edited by Barbara J. Mills and William H. Walker Memory making is a social practice that links people and things together across time and space and ultimately has material consequences. The intersection of matter and social practice becomes archaeologically visible through the deposits created during social activities. The contributors to this volume share a common goal to map out the different ways in which to study social memories in past societies programmatically and tangibly. 2008
The Mesa Verde World The Mesa Verde World Edited by David Grant Noble The Mesa Verde World showcases new findings about the region’s prehistory, environment, and archaeological history, from newly discovered reservoir systems on Mesa Verde to astronomical alignments at Yellow Jacket Pueblo. Key topics include farming, settlement, sacred landscapes, cosmology and astronomy, rock art, warfare, migration, and contemporary Pueblo perspectives. 2006
Mimbres Lives and Landscapes Mimbres Lives and Landscapes Edited by Margaret C. Nelson and Michelle Hegmon The well-illustrated essays in this book offer the latest archaeological research on the ancient Mimbres to explain what we know and what questions still remain about men's and women's lives, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of the dramatic pottery designs. 2010
Mimbres Painted Pottery Mimbres Painted Pottery, Revised Edition J. J. Brody The Mimbres cultural florescence between about AD 1000 and AD 1140 remains one of the most visually astonishing and anthropologically intriguing questions in Southwest prehistory. 2005
The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems Edited by Timothy A. Kohler and Sander E. van der Leeuw How should archaeologists and other social scientists tackle the big and little questions about change in socionatural systems? Although fieldwork is certainly the place to start, it alone is not enough to answer troublesome "how" or "why" questions. To make sense of what they find in the field, archaeologists build models-possible explanations for the data. 2007
“N” 
Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 Navajos in the Catholic Church Records of New Mexico 1694–1875 David M. Brugge Combining archeological evidence with Navajo cultural precepts, David M. Brugge has used the records of the oldest European institution in the American Southwest, the Catholic Church, to shed some light on the practices, causes, and effects of Spanish, Mexican, and American occupation on the Navajo Nation. 2010
“O” 
On the Edge of Splendor On the Edge of Splendor Douglas W. Schwartz The author's research included major surveys and excavations in several crucial regions of the Grand Canyon. Written for a general audience, this book alternates between insightful accounts of Schwartz's personal experiences in the canyon and explorations of the lives and cultures of its early and late inhabitants. 1989
Opening Archaeology Opening Archaeology Edited by Thomas W. Killion In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities. 2008
The Origins of Maya Civilization The Origins of Maya Civilization Edited by Richard E. W. Adams The contributors to this book scrutinize the data, survey external influences on the early Maya, and consider economics, ecology, demography, and warfare - as well as social and ideological factors - in explaining the transformation of Maya culture from a village-oriented society to one centered on elite classes living in large civic centers with monumental architecture. 1977
“P” 
The Past Climate of Arroyo Hondo New Mexico Reconstructed from Tree Rings The Past Climate of Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, Reconstructed from Tree Rings Martin R. Rose, Jeffrey S. Dean, and William P. Robinson This landmark study uses archaeological tree-ring chronologies in the first attempt to quantitatively reconstruct past climate variability. After a step-by-step explanation of the statistical methods the authors reconstruct in inches the annual and spring precipitation of the Arroyo Hondo area for each year from AD 985 to 1970. This is the fourth volume in the series. 1983
The Peopling of Bandelier The Peopling of Bandelier Edited by Robert P. Powers Few visitors to the stunning Frijoles Canyon at Bandelier National Monument realize that its depths embrace but a small part of the archaeological richness of the vast Pajarito Plateau west of Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2005
Photography in Archaeological Research Photography in Archaeological Research Edited by Elmer Harp, Jr.

Contemporary archaeology is increasingly reliant upon photography as a working tool and as a medium for communicating the results of field research. The chapters in this book provide detailed, practical advice and information on photography in the field—from the air, underwater, and in the lab.

1975
Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa Edited by Peter R. Schmidt Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa features some of the foremost archaeologists from Africa and the United States and presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities. 2009
The Pottery from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico The Pottery from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Judith A. Habicht-Mauche Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth century sites in the northern Rio Grande region, was excavated by the School of American Research under the leadership of Douglas W. Schwartz between 1970 and 1974. In this eighth volume of the Arroyo Hondo Archaeological Series, Judith A. Habicht-Mauche presents a masterful description and interpretation of the pottery from Arroyo Hondo. 1993
Pueblo Population and Society Pueblo Population and Society Ann M. Palkovich Excavation at Arroyo Hondo yielded 120 human skeletons, many accompanied by grave goods. This book describes and interprets the skeletal and mortuary remains. 1983
“R” 
Reconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo Societies Reconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo Societies Edited by William A. Longacre

The chapters in this book focus on methods and theories used to systematically test hypotheses about prehistoric social organization. The concern with social organization reflects a larger trend in archaeology that stresses the recovery and use of pertinent data for testing ideas and assumptions.

1970
Roots of Conflict Roots of Conflict Edited by Patrick V. Kirch Roots of Conflict presents the efforts of a team of social and natural scientists to understand the complex, systemic linkages between land, climate, crops, human populations, and their cultural structures. 2011
“S” 
Shipwreck Anthropology Shipwreck Anthropology Edited by Richard A. Gould

“Shipwrecks are part of the legitimate domain of anthropology and can produce results that are as significant for our ability to explain variability in human behavior as any other kind of archaeology, whether it deals with stone tools in a European Paleolithic rockshelter or ceramics contained in a sixteenth-century Spanish shipwreck.” So argues Richard A. Gould, the editor of this volume originating from a 1981 School of American Research advanced seminar.

1983
Simulations in Archaeology Simulations in Archaeology Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff

This book aims to clarify the reasons for using systems models and computer simulations in seeking to understand dynamic cultural patterns. Computer simulations grow logically out of the steps taken by archaeology in the past century: from random data collection to cultural description, proceeding through chronological ordering to interest in process, and finally to systems construction.

1981
Small Worlds Small Worlds Edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, & John Walton Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases. 2008
A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico A Space Syntax Analysis of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, New Mexico Jason S. Shapiro Until recently, archaeologists have rarely studied prehistoric architecture as if it were an artifact comparable to pottery or stone tools. Following the premise that built space embodies social organization, Jason Shapiro takes a fresh look at architectural data from Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, a fourteenth-century site in the northern Rio Grande Valley of presentday New Mexico. 2005
“T” 
Themes in Southwest Prehistory Themes in Southwest Prehistory Edited by George J. Gumerman Two dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population. 1994
Tikal Tikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, & Affairs of State Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff New insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers. 2003
“U” 
Unkar Delta Unkar Delta Douglas W. Schwartz, Richard C. Chapman, and Jane Kepp This book is the first volume in SAR's Archaeology of the Grand Canyon series. It provides information on the archaeological excavation conducted at the site during the late 1960s. 1980
Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors Edited by Mitchell S. Rothman In Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors, ten field and theoretical archaeologists working in the area today offer an overview and analysis of new data and interpretations for Greater Mesopotamia during the late fifth and fourth millennia B.C. 2001
“V” 
The Valley of Mexico The Valley of Mexico Edited by Eric R. Wolf

The chapters in this volume present an important contemporary interpretation of the cultural and archaeological legacy of the Valley of Mexico, a rich and ancient place where the presence of the past is all around. The contributors apply a powerful explanatory model for the development of civilization in terms of environment, population growth, food production, settlement, social differentiation and hierarchy, along with the importance of local and regional interactions involving trade

1976
“W” 
The Walhalla Plateau The Walhalla Plateau Douglas W. Schwartz, Jane Kepp, and Richard C. Chapman The Walhalla Plateau, part of the Grand Canyon's north rim, was the site of seasonal farming by prehistoric Pueblo Indians who later left behind their agricultural terraces and small stone farmhouses. 1979
Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest Edited by Patricia L. Crown Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige. 2001
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